Originally Posted By: Butt Head
Originally Posted By: Rich_Tallcot


Regardless, I posted the Treaty that you alleged made these federal reservations. Could you copy and paste the clause that applies to back up your lies?


what does this mean ?
ARTICLE 2.
The United States acknowledge the lands reserved to the Oneida, Onondaga and Cayuga Nations, in their respective treaties with the state of New-York and called their reservations, to be their property; and the United States will never claim the same, nor disturb them or either of the Six Nations, nor their Indian friends residing thereon and united with them, in the free use and enjoyment thereof: but the said reservations shall remain theirs, until they choose to sell the same to the people of the United States, who have the right to purchase

you sir, are so full of yourself some one should FLUSH

<--- ---<<<

signed BOB McGILL


What it means is that the State owned the Title to the land and allowed the tribe a use right to 100 square miles of this State owned land. Below is the State Treaty with the Cayuga and the 1788 Treaty of Fort Schuyler with the Oneida reads likewise. Both were ruled valid in the land claim because the State had not joined the union yet.

Treaty of Albany
February 25, 1789

A contract executed between the sachems, chiefs and warriors of the tribe or Nation of Indians, called the Cayugas, at a TREATY held in the city of Albany with George Clinton, Pierre Van Courtland, Ezro L’Hommedieu, Abraham Ten Broeck, John Hatham, Samuel Jones, Peter Ganesvoort. Jun. and Egbert Benson, commissioners on behalf of the State of New York, by which the said sachems, chiefs and warriors of the Cayuga covenanted, on the 25th of February 1789, as follows:

"First: the Cayugas do cede and grant ALL their lands to the people of the State of New York , forever."

Secondly: the Cayugas shall, OF THE CEDED LANDS, (meaning the State held title to them)hold to themselves, and to their posterity, forever, for their own use and cultivation, but not to be sold, leased, or in any other manner alienated, or disposed of, to others, (because it was henseforth State owned land) all that tract of land, beginning at the Cayuga salt spring on the Seneka Rive, and running thence southerly to intersect the middle of a line to be drawn from the outlet of Cayuga to the outlet of Waskongh, and from the said place of intersection, southerly, the general course of the eastern bank of the Cayuga lake, thence westerly, to intersect a line running on the west side of the Cayuga lake, at the mean distance of three miles from the western bank thereof, and from the said point of intersection, along the said line, so running on the west side of Cayuga lake, to the Seneka river, thence down the said river to the Cayuga lake, thence through the said lake, to the outlet thereof, and thence further down the Seneka river to the source of beginning, so as to comprehend within the limits aforesaid, and exclusive of the water of Cayuga lake, the quantity of one hundred square miles. Also the place in the Seneka river, at or near the place called Skayes, where the Cayuga have heretofore taken eel; and a competent piece of land on the southern side of the river, at the said place, sufficient for the Cayugas to land and encamp on, and to cure their eel. Excepted, nevertheless, out of the said land so reserved, one mile square at the Cayuga Ferry.

Thirdly: the Cayugas and their posterity, forever, shall enjoy the free rights of hunting in every part of the said CEDED lands, and of fishing in all the waters within the same.

Fourthly: in consideration of the said cession and grant, the people of the State of New York do, at this present TREATY, pay to the Cayugas, five hundred dollars, in silver, and the people of the State of New York shall pay to the Cayugas, on the first day of June next, at Fort Schuyler (formerly known as Fort Stanwix,) the further sum of one thousand six hundred and twenty five dollars, and, also the people of the State of New York shall annually pay to the Cayugas and their posterity, forever, on this first day of June and every year thereafter, at Fort Schuyler aforesaid, five hundred dollars in silver. But if the Cayugas or their posterity, shall at any time hereafter, elect that the whole, or any part of the said annual payment of five hundred dollars, shall be paid in clothing, or provisions, and give six weeks previous notice thereof to the governor of the State for the time being, then so much of the annual payment shall, for that time, be in clothing or provisions, as the Cayugas or their posterity shall elect, and at the price which same shall cost the people of the State of New York, at Fort Schuyler aforesaid. And, as a farther consideration to the Cayugas, the people of the State of New York shall grant to their adopted child, Peter Ryckman, whom they have expressed a desire to remain near them, to assist them, and as a benevolence from them, the Cayugas, to him, and in return for services rendered by him to their nation, the said tract of one mile square at the Cayuga ferry excepted, out of the said lands reserved to the Cayugas for their own use and cultivation, that of a tract beginning on the west bank of the Seneka lake, thence running due west (passing one chain north of a house lately erected, and now in occupation of the said Peter Ryckman), to the line partition between the State of New York and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, of the lands ceded to each other, thence due south along said line of partition, thence due east to the Seneka lake, thence northerly along the bank of said lake, to the Place of the beginning, so as to contain sixteen thousand acres. The people of the State of New York shall grant three hundred and twenty acres to a white person married to a daughter of a Cayuga named Thaniowes, including the present settlement of the said person on the south side of Caghsion creek; and that the people of the State of New York shall grant the residue of the said tract of sixteen thousand acres to Peter Ryckman.

Fifthly: The people of the State of New York may, at all times hereafter, in such manner, and by such means, as they shall deem proper, prevent any person, except the Cayugas and their adopted brethren the Paanese, from residing or setting on the lands to be held by the Cayugas and their posterity for their use and cultivation, and if any person shall, without the consent of the people of the State of New York, come to reside or settle on the said lands, so CEDED, as aforesaid, the Cayugas and their posterity shall forthwith give notice of such intrusions to the governor of the said state for the time being, and further, the Cayugas and their posterity, forever, shall, at the request of the governor of the said State, be abiding to the people of the State of New York in removing all such intruders, and apprehending not only such intruders, but feloms and other offenders, who may happen to be on the said ceded lands, to that end, such intruders, felons and other offenders, may be brought to justice.

Notwithstanding the said reservation herein above specified to the Cayugas, it is declared to be the intent of the parties, that the Cayuga called Fish Carrier, shall have a mile squre of the reserved lands, for the separate use of himself, and for the separate use of his family, forever. Before sealing and delivery hereof, it was for trhe greater certainty, declared to be the intent of the parties, that this grant and cession is to be only the lands eastward of the partition line above mentioned, between the State of New York and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and that, with respect to such part of their country as it is to the westward of said partition line, the right and property of the Cayugas to be the same as if this grant and cession had not been made. The Cayuga salt spring and the land to the extent of one mile around the same, to remain for the commin use and benefit of the people of the State of New York, and the Cayugas and their posterity forever. And the land to be reserved at the fishing place near Skayes, shall be the extent of one mile on each side of the river, the above reservation of land on the southern side of the river, only, notwithstanding.


Glad you asked what it meant rather than assuming you actually knew.