FingerLakes1.com Forums
Page 87 of 87 < 1 2 ... 85 86 87
Topic Options
#1500242 --- 06/19/17 09:05 PM Re: The Obamacare thread is getting too long [Re: kyle585]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 559
Originally Posted By: kyle585
Originally Posted By: gassy one
You don't have any cut & pastes about how great the failed Obamacare is Kyle?
Since you don't read much, you don't know much. There are many cut and pastes about well it could work if the Republicans would work with the Dems on it instead of taking health insurance away from 23 million people.

http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/h...mall-businesses

Donít repeal the ACA: Itís working for small businesses
By Mike Brey - 01/10/17 12:10 PM EST

As federal lawmakers look to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) this month, a critical point is getting lost in all the partisan talk: The ACA is working, especially for small business owners.

Not long after I started Hobby Works in 1992, I began offering health coverage to my employees. That decision wasnít just about attracting and retaining quality workers; as a former retail employee myself, I had found it difficult to get good, affordable insurance.

Although my business has been successful enough that I expanded over the years to four locations in the D.C. area and nearly 50 total employees (30 full-time equivalent employees), I found it increasingly difficult to offer health insurance to my workers. Prior to the ACA, we saw annual premium increases of 15-20 percent or more. As a result, we were forced to ask employees to pay more of their own premiums and face higher deductibles in order to continue offering them coverage.

The numbers make clear just how much my business and my employees benefited from the ACA: In the years prior to implementation, we experienced premium increases of 18-21 percent. Once the ACAís provisions started going into effect however, our rates started improving; we experienced increases of only 7-8 percent.

Other small business owners struggled before the ACA, too. Small Business Majorityís scientific opinion polling found that of employers who didnít offer health insurance to their employees, 70 percent said they didnít provide it because they couldnít afford it. Whatís more, small businesses paid 18 percent more on average for health coverage than large companies and received fewer comprehensive benefits.

The Affordable Care Act was the first legislation in years to give me hope that this spiral of escalating costs and depreciating quality of coverage might finally end. Thanks to the healthcare lawís cost-containment provisions, our premiums have started to stabilize. Whatís more, we now have more options when it comes to insurance carriers and health plans. Where we had only a few carriers to choose from in the past, we can now select between a variety of insurers that each offer many health plans, amounting to more than 100 options for my business to choose from.

While some claim that the healthcare law is a job killer and that small businesses are being forced to make their full-time employees cut their hours, I can say that this has not impacted my business at all. We donít make expansion decisions based on tax law; we do this based on consumer confidence and how we expect sales to increase over time. We have never thought of expanding or shrinking based on the healthcare lawís requirements.

Given that there is a lot of talk right now about ďrepealing and replacingĒ the ACA, itís important to consider that there are only a handful of options for a healthcare structure: we could go back to what we had before the ACA, which is not realistic; we could implement a single-payer system, which is unpopular; or we could continue with a private insurance-based hybrid system that is a form of the ACA.

As federal lawmakers look to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) this month, a critical point is getting lost in all the partisan talk: The ACA is working, especially for small business owners.

Not long after I started Hobby Works in 1992, I began offering health coverage to my employees. That decision wasnít just about attracting and retaining quality workers; as a former retail employee myself, I had found it difficult to get good, affordable insurance.

Although my business has been successful enough that I expanded over the years to four locations in the D.C. area and nearly 50 total employees (30 full-time equivalent employees), I found it increasingly difficult to offer health insurance to my workers. Prior to the ACA, we saw annual premium increases of 15-20 percent or more. As a result, we were forced to ask employees to pay more of their own premiums and face higher deductibles in order to continue offering them coverage.

The numbers make clear just how much my business and my employees benefited from the ACA: In the years prior to implementation, we experienced premium increases of 18-21 percent. Once the ACAís provisions started going into effect however, our rates started improving; we experienced increases of only 7-8 percent.

Other small business owners struggled before the ACA, too. Small Business Majorityís scientific opinion polling found that of employers who didnít offer health insurance to their employees, 70 percent said they didnít provide it because they couldnít afford it. Whatís more, small businesses paid 18 percent more on average for health coverage than large companies and received fewer comprehensive benefits.

The Affordable Care Act was the first legislation in years to give me hope that this spiral of escalating costs and depreciating quality of coverage might finally end. Thanks to the healthcare lawís cost-containment provisions, our premiums have started to stabilize. Whatís more, we now have more options when it comes to insurance carriers and health plans. Where we had only a few carriers to choose from in the past, we can now select between a variety of insurers that each offer many health plans, amounting to more than 100 options for my business to choose from.

While some claim that the healthcare law is a job killer and that small businesses are being forced to make their full-time employees cut their hours, I can say that this has not impacted my business at all. We donít make expansion decisions based on tax law; we do this based on consumer confidence and how we expect sales to increase over time. We have never thought of expanding or shrinking based on the healthcare lawís requirements.

Given that there is a lot of talk right now about ďrepealing and replacingĒ the ACA, itís important to consider that there are only a handful of options for a healthcare structure: we could go back to what we had before the ACA, which is not realistic; we could implement a single-payer system, which is unpopular; or we could continue with a private insurance-based hybrid system that is a form of the ACA.

Iíll acknowledge that the ACA is not perfect. But instead of a full repeal, letís expand on what is already working and make improvements where they are needed. After all, the ACA is the first meaningful reform in decades that meets many of small businessesí core needs in regard to rising healthcare costs. To keep the economy growing, we need policies that allow us to spend less on health premiums so we can keep more of our own profits to reinvest in our companies and create jobs. Repealing a law that works will accomplish none of those things.

Mike Brey is president of Hobby Works and a member of Small Business Majorityís Small Business Council.
That guy is the one who doesn't think insurance should pay for womens fertility issues! A real gem there Kyle!

Top
FingerLakes1.com
#1500243 --- 06/19/17 09:07 PM Re: The Obamacare thread is getting too long [Re: gassy one]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 559
It's really good Kyle! LOL! That's why premiums are going up more than 20% a year when Obama said they were gonna go down!

Top
#1500297 --- 06/21/17 08:54 AM Re: The Obamacare thread is getting too long [Re: gassy one]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 559
Another big failure of Your coveted Obama is the story of Otto Warmbier. Obama has blood on his hands from his failure to do anything for the young man who was actually killed because of Obama's incompetence!

Top
Page 87 of 87 < 1 2 ... 85 86 87