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#593193 --- 06/21/07 07:20 AM The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq
SkySoldier Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 25300
Loc: Finger Lakes National Forest, ...
Sure as hell ain't RBser/beasite.






`
_________________________
America has problems.

We can fix that.

America is not THE problem.

Next time. Vote for the AMERICAN.


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#593275 --- 06/21/07 09:37 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: SkySoldier]
Sausage Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 08/20/03
Posts: 6378
Loc: The Meat Grinder
One might think Bro.
I wish the people that chained those little boys up would have their just deserts coming though.
_________________________
Everybody wants to rule the world..

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#594012 --- 06/22/07 01:06 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Sausage]
Gud4u Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/17/04
Posts: 3466
Sure as hell ain't because of any armchair generals sitting safely in the rear like you Sky...LMAO

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#594300 --- 06/23/07 07:29 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Gud4u]
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY

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#594557 --- 06/24/07 08:54 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Strawberry Jam]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
The Administration is positioning itself to do what it always does, that which it thinks will give it the best political advantage. The big issue is that the "Surge" was never sustainable. The military is too small. (6 years into the bush2 administration some still want to blame Clinton for that. It won't fly.)
Anyhow, the bush2 administration has to begin reducing troop levels before the 2008 elections and they will - for reasons that have nothing to do with the actual situation on the ground in Iraq. That situation has continued to deteriorate.

General’s Iraq Progress Report Has Competition
By DAVID E. SANGER and THOM SHANKER
WASHINGTON, June 23 — Last month, Congress set a deadline for the American commander in Iraq, declaring that by Sept. 15 he would have to assess progress there before billions more dollars are approved to finance the military effort to stabilize the country. The commander, Gen. David H. Petraeus, said in recent days that his report would be only a snapshot of trends, strongly suggesting he will be asking for more time.

But even before he composes the first sentences of the report, to be written with the new American ambassador in Baghdad, Ryan C. Crocker, the administration is commissioning other assessments that could dilute its findings about the impact of the current troop increase. The intent appears to be to give President Bush, who publicly puts great emphasis on listening to his field commanders, a wide range of options.

The assessments are likely to conclude that the Iraqi government has failed to use the troop increase for the purpose the president intended, to strike the political accommodations that he said would stabilize the country. That and other views expected in the various reports could also provide some rationale for beginning a reduction of troops in Iraq under conditions far short of the “victory” Mr. Bush, for the past four years, has said was his ultimate goal. He has used that word with far less frequency recently.

American intelligence agencies, according to senior administration and intelligence officials, are already preparing to submit their own assessment of Iraq’s progress. That is expected to include a judgment about whether Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki is willing or capable of striking the kind of Shiite-Sunni political balance Mr. Bush said was the ultimate objective of the American strategy, and whether the passage of political compromises, none of which have yet cleared Parliament, have any hope of reducing the violence. That report will begin circulating, officials said, around the time that General Petraeus and Mr. Crocker arrive in Washington to testify about what the troop increase has accomplished.

Congress has also asked for an independent commission to report on whether the Iraqi security forces are ready to take on the greater role in stabilizing the country that Mr. Bush has talked about since soon after the 2003 invasion. But lawmakers did not mandate who would conduct the assessment, and tellingly, the Pentagon assigned that task to the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a bipartisan Washington policy institute that has regularly published some scholars’ stinging evaluations of strategic blunders in the administration’s strategy.

The commission will be led by Gen. James L. Jones, the retired former supreme allied commander in Europe, who has made little secret of his doubts about whether the current course will succeed, and John J. Hamre, a former deputy defense secretary who led a study mission to Iraq four years ago that offered recommendations that were largely ignored by the White House.

Little doubt remains that General Petraeus will argue for continuing the troop increase. His deputy, Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, told reporters on Friday that Iraqi forces were “getting better,” “staying and fighting,” “taking casualties” and adding to their numbers.

“If you ask me today, I think by the spring, or earlier, they will be able to take on a larger portion of their security, which means I think potentially we could have a decision to reduce our forces,” General Odierno said. But he also acknowledged that such claims have been made many times in this war, only to be reversed as chaos spread.

Several officials around Mr. Bush, none of whom would speak on the record about internal White House deliberations, said they wanted to make sure the president was given dissenting viewpoints as he made decisions that would determine whether troop withdrawals began in his last year in office.

“The issue now is when do we start withdrawing troops and at what pace,” one senior administration official said. “Petraeus wants as much time as he can get,” the official said, but added that “the president may not have the leeway” to give him that time.

The reality, officials said, is that starting around April the military will simply run out of troops to maintain the current effort. By then, officials said, Mr. Bush would either have to withdraw roughly one brigade a month, or extend the tours of troops now in Iraq and shorten their time back home before redeployment. The latter, said one White House official, “is not something the president wants to do” and would likely become a centerpiece of the 2008 presidential campaign.

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#594654 --- 06/24/07 07:42 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
SkySoldier Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 25300
Loc: Finger Lakes National Forest, ...
AhaHAHhahHhAhAhahahaHAha!

What a boozer. Er, I mean loser. AhHAAhAHhahahHAhHAha!



Key excerpt:

*The morale of both U.S. and Iraqi troops has been boosted by the decision by the Democrat Party to tone down its campaign against U.S. military commitment to Iraq.

There is a feeling in Baghdad that the possibility of America opting for a cut-and-run strategy has decreased.

That, in turn, has encouraged the Iraqi military to stop hedging its bets and enter the battle with greater resolve.

YOU'RE DAMN RIGHT I QUESTION YOUR PATRIOTISM, HARRY REID AND JACK MURTHA!
----------------------

New York Post
June 22, 2007

Iraq: Military Gains, Gov't Mess

By Amir Taheri

SIX months ago, the U.S.- led Coalition force in Iraq appeared to be largely in self-defense mode, allowing terrorists and insurgents much latitude in parts of Baghdad and the troubled provinces of Anbar andDiyala.

At the same time, the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki appeared to be engaged in a broad political offensive.

Today we have what looks like a reversal of the two situations - with dynamism in the military field but lethargy in the political.

The Coalition has increased its effective force by almost 20,000 men and, under its new commander, Gen. David Petraeus, has moved into offensive gear:

*The province of Anbar, Iraq's wild west since ancient times, has been partly stabilized with the help of Sunni Arab tribes who have taken up arms against al Qaeda and its Ba'athist allies.

*In those of Baghdad neighborhoods where terrorists held sway, Iraqi security forces, backed by U.S.troops, are establishing an effective presence, allowing a slow return to normal.

Reassured by the troop presence, the inhabitants of at least one
neighborhood, Amiriyah, have chased away a terror outfit entrenched there since 2003.

*The Iraqi army, backed by U.S. and British troops, has moved onto the offensive in the Shiite south as well. This week a major operation smashed an extensive smuggling ring in Maysan province, shutting one route through which Iranian-made weapons are supplied to terrorists.

*Iraqi forces have designed and led a number of operations aimed at clearing the environs of Baghdad of insurgents and flushing out terrorist cells in Baquba's orange groves.

More than 5,000 Iraqi troops and some 2,000 paramilitaries are taking part in "combing out" operations in Diyala, the largest
turnout of Iraqi forces at any one time since 1992.

*A new corps of Iraqi officers is taking shape, as hundreds of NCOs and officers up to the rank of two-star general from the disbanded army are re-inserted after extensive probing procedures.

*Recruitment in the new Iraqi army and police is up by almost 10 percent; the number of battle-tested battalions is up from 22 to almost 50.

*Iraq forces, backed by Coalition troops, are finally in control of the 1,483-kilometer land and water borders with Iran, which had been left virtually unsupervised since 2003.

Only last month, the Iraqis and the Coalition established control over Al Qaim, the town that controls the border with Syria.

*Reports indicate that in the last 10 weeks the various armed enemies of new Iraq have suffered theirheaviest losses since the start of the conflict four years ago.

*The insurgents are suffering a significant number of defections while an unknown number are believed to have left Iraq, presumably to pursue "jihad" in other Muslim countries.

*Coalition and Iraqi forces have seized weapons from the insurgents on an unprecedented scale. More than 20 bomb-making factories have also been discovered and neutralized in and around Baghdad.

*The morale of both U.S. and Iraqi troops has beenboosted by the decision by the Democrat Party to tone down its campaign against U.S. military commitment to Iraq.
There is a feeling in Baghdad that the possibility of America opting for a cut-and-run strategy has decreased.

That, in turn, has encouraged the Iraqi military to stop hedging its bets and enter the battle with greater resolve.



Iranian-born journalist Amir Taheri is based in
Europe.
_________________________
America has problems.

We can fix that.

America is not THE problem.

Next time. Vote for the AMERICAN.


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#594703 --- 06/24/07 09:30 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: SkySoldier]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
Propaganda like the above does not change the reality of the failure of US policy in Iraq, and the unnecessary waste of US lives. This is the reality which the US public understands and wants the war to end.

U.S. questions strength of Iraqi forces By LAUREN FRAYER, Associated Press Writer
1 hour, 50 minutes ago
The U.S. commander of a new offensive north of Baghdad, reclaiming insurgent territory day by day, said Sunday his Iraqi partners may be too weak to hold onto the gains. The Iraqi military does not even have enough ammunition, said Brig. Gen. Mick Bednarek: "They're not quite up to the job yet."

His counterpart south of Baghdad seemed to agree, saying U.S. troops are too few to garrison the districts newly rid of insurgents. "It can't be coalition (U.S.) forces. We have what we have. There's got to be more Iraqi security forces," said Maj. Gen. Rick Lynch.

The two commanders spoke after a deadly day for the U.S. military in Iraq. At least 12 soldiers were killed on Saturday from roadside bombings and other causes, leaving at least 31 dead for the week.

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#595188 --- 06/26/07 07:22 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY
Apparently these generals are not among the "generals" RBS'er "talks" to at night when he is lonely:

Mattis calls for consensus on war on terror

By: MARK WALKER - Staff Writer

CAMP PENDLETON ---- Faced with an increasingly skeptical Congress and overwhelming public opposition to the conflict in Iraq, the general in charge of Marine Corps forces in the Middle East is calling for a national dialogue on what the military calls "the long war."


Hear The Interview

Lt. Gen. James Mattis told the North County Times during an exclusive interview this week that while a lot of work has been done in Iraq and Afghanistan, there is much to do to defeat the extremist threats to Middle East stability and long-term U.S. security.


"The problem of violent extremists existed long before 2003, and it is going to exist long after the next presidential election," said Mattis, who also commands Camp Pendleton's 25,000-member I Marine Expeditionary Force. "We are going to have to confront it and come up with a national policy."

The slightly built, 57-year-old combat veteran said he understood that the unconventional nature of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and their sustained lengths, are testing American resolve.

"We have to recognize that our electoral process may not provide the patience consistent with fighting this sort of war," he said. "Sincere, patriotic Americans can disagree with where we are going, but we have got to come up with an understanding and build consensus for how we are going to address it."

The three-star general's remarks came during the wide-ranging, two-hour interview with a reporter and editor in his wood-paneled office on the second floor of the I Marine Expeditionary Force headquarters at Camp Pendleton.

Mattis spends more time visiting his battlefield commanders and troops in the Middle East than in the well-appointed base office. The interview took place Tuesday, less than 48 hours after he had returned from his latest trip to Iraq and during a typically busy day for one of America's top combat generals.

During the session, Mattis also addressed these key points:

- The volatile Anbar region west of Baghdad that the Marines are responsible for has seen dramatic improvements as a result of increased cooperation among Sunni tribes.

- Despite the military now finding a majority of roadside bombs before they can be detonated, the insurgents most lethal weapon remains a constant threat.

- As insurgents move out of the Anbar area into provinces such as Diyala south of Baghdad, the military will have to shift battle operations.

- The media have too often given a "moral bye" to acts of terror committed by the insurgency that amount to wanton, intentional murder of civilians.

'We are winning'

The increasing Sunni tribal cooperation with U.S. troops in Iraq's Anbar province has al-Qaida-linked insurgents on the run, Mattis said.

"I caution people that this is not irreversible," he said. "But at the same time, we are winning and the enemy is losing."

Mattis' comments were echoed by Marine Brig. Gen. John Allen, deputy commander of U.S. forces in Anbar, who said Wednesday that insurgents have been pushed out of highly populated areas.

During a December interview with the newspaper, the blunt-talking Mattis predicted such a shift as the Sunnis who dominate the region west of Baghdad became increasingly disenchanted with civilian killings.

About 8,000 Camp Pendleton Marines are now in Iraq, including members of the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit, which just arrived. The local Marines are the latest unit to join the troop buildup ordered by President Bush earlier this year, a decision made despite waning congressional and popular support for the war.

Regarded by some as one of the most astute and aggressive generals in the Marine Corps, Mattis stressed that the U.S. is not directly arming any Sunni groups, as published reports have indicated.

The Sunni groups have their own weapons, and rather than arming them, U.S. forces are helping train them as part of the security and police forces. Sunnis comprise a minority of Iraq's population and have been part of the insurgency since it first emerged in the summer of 2003.

How it happened

Iraqis who had been sympathetic to the insurgency became disenchanted as al-Qaida forces carried out murders of young boys and a local sheik who didn't respond to their overtures, Mattis said.

"These were mistakes," he said of those killings and how the incidents created an opportunity for the U.S. to make new alliances. "And war, at times, is decided by whoever makes the fewest mistakes."

Marines in the vast Anbar region, where more of their forces have been killed and injured than any other in Iraq, now routinely get tips to the location of roadside bombs.

As a result, a majority of the deadly devices are now being discovered before they are detonated, resulting in sharp reductions in troop deaths. Anbar residents also routinely report where the insurgents can be found, calling in the information to telephone tip lines that the military has established, Mattis said.

Despite the progress, Mattis cautioned that bombs remain a constant threat.

"There are still going to be good days and bad days out there," he said. "We cannot get complacent, but at the same time, our progress is undeniable."

If the violence continues to subside, Mattis said, Sunni forces can be redirected into job training programs. Disbanding those forces, as the U.S. leadership did with the Iraqi army shortly after troops reached Baghdad, would, in his view, be a mistake, the general said.

"As I recall, that didn't work out to well the first time," he said, referring to suddenly jobless soldiers taking up arms against coalition forces.

Media portrayal

Sitting on one of two high-backed chairs that face a sofa inside his office, Mattis expressed repeated frustration over media portrayals of the war.

Insurgent attacks are reported as "a car bomb went off in Baghdad today," he said. The general said the reports all too often do not actively pin the deadliness of the bombs on enemy forces.

But when civilians are mistakenly killed by U.S. forces, the media portrays such incidents as examples of severe ethical failings, he said, citing recent examples of inadvertent civilian deaths from U.S. bombs and small-arms attacks.

"A (insurgent) bombing is reported like it was an act of God," said Mattis, whose job includes being the authority over two ongoing prosecutions of Camp Pendleton Marines accused of murder in the deaths of Iraqi civilians. "You can see the moral bye ---- the passive voice given to the enemy's intentional murder."

The insurgency counts on negative portrayals of U.S. forces in Iraq and in the U.S., he said, adding that he believes the battle for hearts and minds is being played out in news reports.

"This enemy has decided that the war, the real war for them, will be fought in the narrative in the media."

Who is Gen. Mattis?

In the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Mattis commanded Camp Pendleton's 1st Marine Division, and in 2001 led a combat force in southern Afghanistan, making him one of the most experienced combat commanders among Marine generals.

Washington Post reporter Thomas Ricks wrote extensively on Mattis in his 2006 book, "Fiasco," that tells how the U.S. got into Iraq and the mistakes made in the subsequent occupation.

"Mattis is unusual in many ways, most notably in being one of the more intense intellectuals in the U.S. military," Ricks wrote.

A bachelor, Mattis helped write a manual on how to fight an insurgency, and requires his officers to plow through an exhaustive reading list. And as Ricks reported, Mattis once owned thousands of books until he gave most away in 2005, reducing his personal library to around 1,000.

During three conversations with the North County Times over the 12 months, Mattis routinely referred to Alexander the Great, Mao, and a variety of historical figures.

"Ultimately, a real understanding of history means that we face nothing new under the sun," he once wrote in an e-mail that was recounted in Ricks' book.

His blunt style got him in trouble in late 2004, when he was quoted as telling a gathering a gathering of military contractors and officers in San Diego that "it's fun to shoot some people." That prompted a rebuke from the commandant of the Marine Corps, but it was during that same address that Ricks reported he made a more telling comment.

"Don't patronize this enemy," he also said that day. "They mean business. They mean every word they say."

The way ahead

The II Marine Expeditionary Force based at North Carolina's Camp Lejeune now has the primary responsibility for security in Anbar, having replaced Camp Pendleton's I Marine Expeditionary Force last fall.

Mattis hinted that the local force may be headed back at the end of this year.

"For us, this is a long war and I MEF will be key to that. It has been in the fight since the early days and will continue to stay in the fight."

In September, Army Gen. David Petraeus will report to Congress the effects of the troop escalation that sent nearly 30,000 additional troops, bringing the current force level to about 156,000.

Mattis said late last year that he believed winning would take five more years. On Tuesday, he said he believed Petraeus will make clear in the fall what it will take to accomplish a free and democratic Iraq.

"I believe that General Petraeus is going to be able to point to the situation we confront and give a very coherent program for the way ahead. I am absolutely confident of that."

Contact staff writer Mark Walker at (760) 740-3529 or mlwalker@nctimes.com.

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007/06/22/news/top_stories/1_01_046_21_07.txt

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#595731 --- 06/27/07 04:45 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Strawberry Jam]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
This is the opinion of a general and a lieutenant colonel actually in Iraq and fighting the war there:

Complete article at: http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/iraq/2007-06-26-iraq-outpost-cover_N.htm

Under new Baghdad plan, U.S. is a careful referee

The episode illustrated the bind in which U.S. forces find themselves at a time when most members of Iraq's army here are Shiites and remain suspicious of Sunni leaders. An extra 28,500 American troops and a new strategy to open outposts across Baghdad have helped reduce the violence in many parts of the capital, and made neighborhoods safer. Stores are opening and people are walking at night in some areas.
But the Iraqi government's failure to resolve long-simmering ethnic hatreds and make concessions to Sunnis suggest the improved security may remain only as long as U.S. forces are here, keeping a lid on violence.
The goal of the escalation of U.S. forces in Iraq, which was announced in January and completed this month, is to establish security long enough for Iraq's government to make concessions to win the support of the Sunnis, who form the backbone of the insurgency.
"I think we have created an opportunity for the government of Iraq to establish some policies for reconciliation," said Lt. Col. James Nickolas, commander of the battalion that established the outposts in Ghazaliyah. "I'm not sure that's been taken advantage of."
Lt. Gen. Raymond Odierno, the No. 2 ranking U.S. officer in Iraq, said in an interview that American troops "can provide security here now and defeat al-Qaeda," but "ultimately … this is going to come down to political and diplomatic progress."

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#596218 --- 06/27/07 03:57 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
SkySoldier Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 25300
Loc: Finger Lakes National Forest, ...


Good! So you do agree we are winning in Iraq.

That's a big first step to sanity but still an obvious one.

Quote:
"I think we have created an opportunity for the government of Iraq to establish some policies for reconciliation," said Lt. Col. James Nickolas, commander of the battalion that established the outposts in Ghazaliyah. "I'm not sure that's been taken advantage of."
Lt. Gen. Raymond Odierno, the No. 2 ranking U.S. officer in Iraq, said in an interview that American troops "can provide security here now and defeat al-Qaeda," but "ultimately … this is going to come down to political and diplomatic progress."



Now. Embrace reality.

This is the opinion of another General running the show. AND is fighting there.


U.S. could cut troops in Iraq next spring: general
Fri Jun 22, 2007 1:35pm ET



WASHINGTON (Reuters) - It could be next spring before U.S. troops in Iraq can hand over areas gained in their latest offensive to Iraqi forces and start to draw down, a top American commander said on Friday.

Army Lt. Gen Ray Odierno also said Iran appeared to have boosted support and training for Shi'ite militia groups in Iraq in recent months.

Odierno, the top U.S. commander for day-to-day operations in Iraq, said the United States was not arming groups responsible for insurgent attacks to fight al Qaeda but he defended working with them in some areas. Reuters Pictures

U.S. and Iraqi forces last week launched what commanders described as a major effort to eliminate al Qaeda fighters and their bomb factories with simultaneous attacks in various areas around Baghdad.

"The key piece will be the follow-on operation of Iraqi police, Iraqi army and coalition forces," Odierno told reporters at the Pentagon by video link from Iraq.

He said the Iraqis' ability to hold areas cleared by U.S. soldiers would determine when the United States could reduce troop levels, which have increased this year by some 28,000 to more than 155,000.

"I think if everything goes the way it's going now, there's a potential that by the spring we would be able to reduce forces and Iraqi security forces could take over," Odierno said.
_________________________
America has problems.

We can fix that.

America is not THE problem.

Next time. Vote for the AMERICAN.


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#596244 --- 06/27/07 05:00 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: SkySoldier]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
If your definition of winning is the same stupid one you use for our victories in Vietnam, than I agree. If winning means the Iraq war will come to a successful conclusion for the US and the present Iraqi government you are, as usual, living in a parallel universe.
We will end up withdrawing most of our combat troops from Iraq within the next year and the chaos that exists now will get even worse. Lebanon will look good in comparison.

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#599073 --- 07/03/07 02:53 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: SkySoldier]
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY
Iraq Cabinet Approves Oil Law Draft
By QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA,AP
Posted: 2007-07-03 11:39:51
BAGHDAD (AP) - Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's Cabinet approved a draft oil law sought by the U.S. to boost reconciliation between Iraq's Sunnis and Shiites and the Iraqi parliament planned to debate the measure Wednesday.

For months, Washington has pressed its ally al-Maliki to quickly pass the oil law and other pieces of legislation, considered vital to President Bush's attempts to end Iraq's turmoil - alongside a security crackdown by an increased U.S. military force.

But the law, which is to define the distribution of Iraq's oil wealth, has been tied up in bickering among Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish parties in al-Maliki's deeply divided ruling coalition, frustrating U.S. officials as American support for the war wanes.

The prime minister announced Tuesday that his Cabinet had unanimously approved the oil draft and that the parliament would begin discussing it the following day. He called the bill "the most important law in Iraq."

Twenty-four of the Cabinet's 37 members were present for the vote; ministers from the Sunni Iraqi Accordance Front and the Shiite Sadrist movement boycotted over separate political disputes with al-Maliki.

Still, despite the weakened coalition, the approval means parliament is likely to pass the measure. Government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh said Cabinet approval came after amendments prompted by the Accordance Front. He did not give details on the changes or the bill's final version.

The issue of oil distribution is a top concern of Iraq's Sunni Arab minority, which is centered in regions of the country with little oil resources and which fears Shiites and Kurds - who now dominate the government - would monopolize profits from the industry.

U.S. officials are hoping that passage of an oil bill will help rally Sunni support for the government and the political process and reduce backing for insurgents.

But Kurds, centered in an autonomous zone in the oil-rich north, rejected previous drafts, believing they did not guarantee them a fair share of revenues in northern oil fields they control or hope to control. Shiites, who control major southern oil resources, have been reluctant to share revenues with Sunnis, who dominated Saddam Hussein's regime, which oppressed Shiites and Kurds.

Also Tuesday, Iraq's parliament replaced Sunni Arab legislator Mishan al-Jabouri, who was accused of siphoning millions intended to pay for food for units created to protect oil pipelines.

His seat was filled by a member of the same tribe in Tikrit, Hussein Mohammed Abdullah al-Jabouri, a statement from parliament said.

Mishan al-Jabouri has denied the charges and left Iraq. He told The Associated Press in the Syrian capital of Damascus that the move to replace him "contradicts the constitution and the law."

Bush has pressed al-Maliki to take a series of political steps - opening jobs to Sunnis who supported Saddam, amending the constitution to satisfy Sunni aspirations and holding local elections - aimed at bringing Sunni Arabs into the political process. With support for the war dropping among Americans, the steps would also help convince the U.S. public and Congress that Iraqi leaders are doing what is needed to halt the violence.

The security crackdown, backed by 28,000 extra U.S. troops deployed in Iraq this year, has aimed to give a margin of stability to allow Iraqi politicians to pass the measures. The offensive in Baghdad and areas to the north and south has fueled a surge in American casualties - though bombings and other attacks appear to have fallen in the capital in recent days.

A U.S. military Kiowa attack helicopter was shot down by insurgents south of Baghdad on Monday, the U.S. military said in a statement. An Apache helicopter rescued the craft's two pilots, who were lightly hurt, it said.

The military also said Tuesday that U.S. forces waged a large battle with gunmen near the western Sunni city of Ramadi over the weekend, in fighting that left 23 insurgents dead. The insurgents had massed on Donkey Island, a patch of land in a canal outside the city, and opened fire on U.S. troops, prompting the gunbattle Saturday. Troops found caches of weapons, explosives and suicide vests, the military said.

In Baghdad, an Iraqi army lieutenant colonel and an Interior Ministry intelligence officer were killed in separate drive-by shootings Tuesday, police said. A car bomb hit the convoy of an Iraqi police colonel in the northern city of Kirkuk, killing two passers-by and wounding 17, though the colonel survived, police in the city said.

And a detainee died of "apparent natural causes" Sunday at a hospital in a U.S. Army prison. The military did not identify the detainee but said the death remains under investigation.


Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
07/03/07 11:38 EDT

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#599108 --- 07/03/07 03:51 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Strawberry Jam]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
You making any bets on when (if ever) it will be passed into law?

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#599300 --- 07/04/07 07:43 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
Iraqi Kurds Say They Have Not Seen New Oil Bill
By VOA News
04 July 2007

Iraq's Kurdish regional government says it has not yet had a chance to review a new draft law on oil revenue-sharing that was approved by the Iraqi Cabinet on Tuesday.


Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, center, presides over cabinet meeting in Baghdad, 03 Jul 2007
The Kurdish government said in a statement Wednesday that it hopes the Cabinet has not approved a text the Kurds would disagree with because that would violate their constitutional rights.

The new draft law is a revised version of one the Cabinet approved in February. But some factions rejected that version, forcing a re-negotiation that produced the current bill. The details of the bill have not been released.

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#599325 --- 07/04/07 08:48 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
No quick debate in Iraq on oil law
Wed Jul 4, 2007 8:49AM EDT
By Mussab Al-Khairalla and Ahmed Rasheed

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraq's parliament might take a week to start debating a key draft oil law, officials said on Wednesday, as complaints from Shi'ite and Sunni Arab politicians and Kurdish authorities signaled its passage could be rocky.

Washington has pushed Iraq for months to speed up passage of the law and other pieces of legislation seen as vital to curbing sectarian violence and healing deep divisions between majority Shi'ites and minority Sunni Arabs.

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#599632 --- 07/05/07 07:13 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY
Al-Qaida Deputy Leader Seen in New Video
By LEE KEATH,AP
Posted: 2007-07-05 05:28:48
BAGHDAD (AP) - Al-Qaida's deputy leader sought to bolster the terror network's main arm in Iraq in a new video released Thursday, calling on Muslims to rally behind it at a time when the group is on the defensive, faced with U.S. offensives and splits with other insurgent groups.

Ayman al-Zawahri defended the Islamic State of Iraq - the insurgent umbrella group headed by al-Qaida - against critics among Islamic militant groups, saying it was a vanguard for fighting off the U.S. military and eventually establishing a "caliphate" of Islamic rule across the region.

Al-Zawahri, the top deputy of Osama bin Laden, called on Muslims to follow a two-pronged strategy: work at home to topple "corrupt" Arab regimes and join al-Qaida's "jihad," or holy war, in Iraq, Afghanistan and Somalia to fight and train "to prepare for the next jihad."

The Egyptian militant did not mention last week's failed car bombing attempts in Britain, which British authorities are investigating for al-Qaida links. That suggested the video, posted Thursday on an Islamic militant Web site, was made before the events in London and Glasgow.

Al-Qaida's declaration of the Islamic State of Iraq last year was a dramatic move aimed at staking out its leadership of Iraq's insurgency. Allying itself with several smaller Iraqi Sunni insurgent groups, it presented the Islamic State as an alternative government within Iraq, claiming to hold territory.

The move quickly met resistance. Some Islamic extremist clerics in the Arab world said it was too soon to declare an Islamic state because the Islamic law qualifications were not yet met and argued that a true Islamic state is not viable while there are still U.S. forces in Iraq.

Several large Iraqi Sunni insurgent groups publicly denounced al-Qaida, saying its fighters were killing theirs and pressuring them to join the Islamic State. One group, the 1920 Revolution Brigades, has begun overtly cooperating with U.S. forces and Sunni tribal leaders to attack al-Qaida.

At the same time, increased U.S. forces sent to Iraq this year are waging a number of offensives in suspected al-Qaida strongholds north and south of Baghdad and in western Anbar province, claiming to have captured and killed a number of significant figures in the group
The offensives have caused an increase in American casualties, but insurgent and militia attacks appear to have fallen in the past week.
.

On Thursday, Baghdad was relatively quiet, with police reports of a policeman and a civilian killed in a shooting and bombing. A roadside bomb hit a police patrol in the northern city of Mosul, killing a civilian and wounding three police.

Iraq's Shiite and Kurdish leaders on Thursday were trying to overcome a Sunni Arab boycott of the Cabinet of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, which threatens to hold up a key new oil law. The United States is pressing hard for passage of the long-delayed oil law in hopes it will encourage Sunni support of the government.

Al-Zawahri spent much of the unusually long video - at an hour and 35 minutes - defending the Islamic State, criticizing those who refuse to recognize it "because it lacks the necessary qualifications" even while he acknowledged it had made unspecified mistakes.

"The Islamic State of Iraq is set up in Iraq, the mujahedeen (holy warriors) celebrate it in the streets of Iraq, the people demonstrate in support of it," al-Zawahri said, "pledges of allegiance to it are declared in the mosques of Baghdad."

He said Muslims around the world should "support this blessed fledgling mujahid garrison state with funds, manpower, opinion, information and expertise," saying its founding brought the Islamic world closer to "establishment of the caliphate, with God's permission."

He urged critics to work with the Islamic State "even if we see in it shortcomings," and said Islamic State leaders should "open their hearts" to consultations. "The mujahedeen are not innocent of deficiency, error and slips," he said. "The mujahedeen must solve their problems among themselves."

Al-Zawahri appeared in the video - first reported by IntelCenter and SITE, two U.S.-based groups that monitor militant messages - wearing a white robe and turban and, as he often does, took a professorial tone, making points by citing Islamic history and by showing clips of experts speaking on Western and Arabic media.

He denounced Egypt, Jordan and Saudi at length. He warned Iraq's Sunni minority against seeing them as allies, saying they pretend to support the Sunni cause while allying themselves with the United States.

If Saudi Arabia controls Iraq or Sunni regions of Iraq, "the Iraqis would then suffer the same repression and humiliation which the people suffer under Saudi rule under the pretext of combating terrorism - i.e., combatting jihad and preserving American security," al-Zawahri said.

The al-Qaida deputy also laid out an al-Qaida strategy, saying in the near-term militant should target U.S. and Israeli interests "everywhere" in retaliation for "attacks on the Islamic nation" in Iraq, Afghanistan and Somalia.

The long-term strategy calls for "diligent work to change these corrupt and corrupting (Arab) regimes." He said Muslims should "rush to the fields of jihad" in Iraq, Afghanistan and Somalia "to defeat the enemies of the Islamic nation" and for "training to prepare for the next jihad."


Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
07/05/07 05:27 EDT

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#599726 --- 07/05/07 10:50 AM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
Sausage Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 08/20/03
Posts: 6378
Loc: The Meat Grinder
So you believe that winning is pulling out, just like Vietnam, I take that as correct?
_________________________
Everybody wants to rule the world..

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#599774 --- 07/05/07 12:04 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Sausage]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
Where did I ever say that we can achieve a military victory in Iraq? Only the neo's are still spouting that nonsense.

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#600015 --- 07/05/07 06:07 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: Retired Soldier]
SkySoldier Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 25300
Loc: Finger Lakes National Forest, ...
You have never said one word of worth. Except to the OTHER side.

I do hope you can read RBser.

July 4: What are we fighting for


1. Equality of rights before the law:

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." — Declaration of Independence

"Thus if [a] Muslim commits adultery his punishment is 100 lashes, the shaving of his head, and one year of banishment. But if the man is not a Muslim and commits adultery with a Muslim woman his penalty is execution...Similarly if a Muslim deliberately murders another Muslim he falls under the law of retaliation and must by law be put to death by the next of kin.

But if a non-Muslim who dies at the hand of a Muslim has by lifelong habit been a non-Muslim, the penalty of death is not valid. Instead the Muslim murderer must pay a fine and be punished with the lash....

Since Islam regards non-Muslims as on a lower level of belief and conviction, if a Muslim kills a non-Muslim…then his punishment must not be the retaliatory death, since the faith and conviction he possesses is loftier than that of the man slain...

Again, the penalties of a non-Muslim guilty of fornication with a Muslim woman are augmented because, in addition to the crime against morality, social duty and religion, he has committed sacrilege, in that he has disgraced a Muslim and thereby cast scorn upon the Muslims in general, and so must be executed....

Islam and its peoples must be above the infidels, and never permit non-Muslims to acquire lordship over them." —

Sultanhussein Tabandeh, A Muslim Commentary on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, F. J. Goulding, translator, London, 1970.

2. Governments deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed:

"That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed..." — Declaration of Independence

Non-Muslims have "absolutely no right to seize the reins of power in any part of God’s earth nor to direct the collective affairs of human beings according to their own misconceived doctrines." If they do, "the believers would be under an obligation to do their utmost to dislodge them from political power and to make them live in subservience to the Islamic way of life."

— Syed Abul Ala Maududi, founder of the Pakistani political party Jamaat-e-Islami

Posted by Robert at July 4, 2007 8:46 AM

Happy Independence Day to all American posters on this site, from one of your friendly neighbours to the north.

The United States has always been a beacon of freedom to the oppressed, and the ideals upon which your country was created are among the loftiest aspirations of humankind.

As a great American patriot once said, Live free or die.

This may never have been truer than today, with all the threats facing the free world.




http://www.jihadwatch.org/archives/017246.php






_________________________
America has problems.

We can fix that.

America is not THE problem.

Next time. Vote for the AMERICAN.


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#600082 --- 07/05/07 08:50 PM Re: The reason we are WINNING in Afghanistan and Iraq [Re: SkySoldier]
Retired Soldier Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 12/23/05
Posts: 12945
Loc: Rochester, NY
You are so full of crap. The war in Iraq has been a tragic and criminal mistake. It has sacrificed the lives of thousands - for nothing. Another Republican senator has come to face reality and realize that we need to get out and stop wasting lives.

Another senior Republican breaks with Bush on Iraq By Susan Cornwell
Thu Jul 5, 6:28 PM ET



WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President George W. Bush's Iraq war policy continued to hemorrhage support in the U.S. Senate as another senior Republican called on Thursday for a new strategy that would start to bring troops home.

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A day after Bush appealed to Americans to be more patient with the unpopular war, six-term New Mexico Sen. Pete Domenici, who is up for re-election next year, urged a new course.

"I am unwilling to continue our current strategy," Domenici, who serves on the Senate's defense appropriations subcommittee, said in a statement.

"I do not support an immediate withdrawal from Iraq or a reduction in funding for our troops. But I do support a new strategy that will move our troops out of combat operations and on the path to coming home," Domenici said.

Domenici joined the ranks of influential Republican lawmakers who recently have broken with Bush over the 4-year-old conflict in Iraq, declaring themselves unable to keep backing a war that has no end in sight after the deaths of 3,590 U.S. troops.

NO END IN SIGHT.

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