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#458744 --- 12/05/06 04:54 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
greenelf Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 2956
.."Fat bottomed girls you make the rockin' world go round"-Queen
Good for you Scottie! Glad to hear it!

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#458745 --- 12/05/06 09:40 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
SilverFox Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 6485
Loc: Waterloo
Scottie you are on the right track. The past can't be changed, you only have the future. You realize you are human and humans make mistakes. So forgive yourself for past hurt and failures. Hopefully, those you have hurt will find forgiveness at some time in the future. Grudges, paybacks and unwillingness to forgive are negative emotions and are a waste of one's life. Life is too short to waste. Take each day as it comes and do your best. That is all anyone can ask of you. That is all you can ask of yourself.
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#458746 --- 12/06/06 04:37 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
yes guilt and being able to forgive yourself are 2 very hard things... I always continued on the wrong path because it was easier to deal with the guilt for the pain I had caused even though in doing so continued to hurt people. Guilt is a vicious cycle. The first step I had to take was RESPONSIBILITY...I had to take responsibility for my actions... I was the one to blame for my actions.... no one else! Next step was to STOP... I had to stop continuing to hurt people... The came the realization time.... all together I had realize even though I stopped hurting people there were some that wouldn't forgive. I hate hearing people say....I was dealt a bad hand in life that's why I do what I do!!! BS! Everyone is dealt the same hand....it how you play the cards that matters!

Please don't see me as a *WISE MAN*....all this knowledge came with time... and lots and lots and LOTS of thereapy
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#458747 --- 12/07/06 02:27 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
SilverFox Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 6485
Loc: Waterloo
Scottie your education came from the "school of hard knocks" but it sounds like you have learned your lessons well. You have earned your "wisdom" the hard way. Nothing is more important than taking responsibility for your actions. I have no patience with people that lie, cheat, etc. and blame every one else for what they have done. You are right on the mark to call it B.S.

You are one forum person that I would hope to meet some day.
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#458748 --- 12/07/06 02:46 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
LOL I always wanted to put on my resume` that I graduated with HONORS from HKU (Hard Knocks University) LOL. Thanks for your kind words SF and yes it would be great to meet you in the future as well.
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#458749 --- 12/07/06 03:16 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Sparkey Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 01/07/06
Posts: 22788
Loc: Seneca Falls
Quote:

Scottie your education came from the "school of hard knocks" but it sounds like you have learned your lessons well. You have earned your "wisdom" the hard way. Nothing is more important than taking responsibility for your actions. I have no patience with people that lie, cheat, etc. and blame every one else for what they have done. You are right on the mark to call it B.S.

You are one forum person that I would hope to meet some day.




SF,meeting Scottie would be one of the greater things in life he is a honest true friend always!
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#458750 --- 12/07/06 12:05 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
Awww thanks sparks!! luv ya too
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#458751 --- 12/15/06 05:47 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
HeavenlyPlaces Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 02/26/02
Posts: 21990
Loc: Someplace Else
Saw this article yesterday, thought I'd share it for any who might find it useful.

S A D
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#458752 --- 12/15/06 08:14 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
TRD_Tacoma Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/19/02
Posts: 12952
Loc: Rochester
Nice article HP. I know for me, it started very early this year. Normally I start feeling the effects in late October/early November. This year it started as early as the first of September. Generally, I am able to just push the depression aside and go on with daily life. This year, I found myself wanting to stay in bed. The depression was bad enough that there were nights I would come home from work and not be able to do anything...even watching tv was too much of an effort. Fortunately, doctors can help when people develop these symptoms. I ended up getting a prescription for Effexor which has made a world of difference.

I would recommend that anyone experiencing the effects of SAD to go see their doctor.
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#458753 --- 12/15/06 01:15 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY
Just went out for a nice walk with the pup. It started raining on our way home, but it felt wonderful and freeing.
I know we have nice weather coming for awhile, but I want to get back to my walking twice a day for as long as I can.

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#458754 --- 12/15/06 01:23 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
TRD_Tacoma Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/19/02
Posts: 12952
Loc: Rochester
The sun was out this morning here. It makes two days in a row that I found myself sitting at my desk with the sun coming in the window on my back. It felt so good.
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#458755 --- 12/15/06 05:07 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
greenelf Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 2956
I need to get in some walking-before the weather gets totally crappy. I get kinda blue this time of year-my father died in early Dec. 1975, so I always think of him and miss him most around the holidays. I'm glad your scrip is working for you TRD, but I already take so many pills I'm starting to rattle! Don't want to add anything new.

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#458756 --- 12/15/06 11:48 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/28/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
Interesting link. Thanks.

A couple of years ago, I started taking extra vitamin d (in cod liver oil), in addition to my multi-vitamin. I knew that sunlight causes d to be made in the skin, and wondered if full spectrum light boxes were strong enough to do the same, and if lack of d was the thing that causes SAD. This thread caused me to finally search it, and among other articles, I found this:

Sleeping too Much?
You Could be SAD.

By Dr. Natasha Turner, ND

Every fall I am consumed with the sad realization that I will soon face yet another long winter. Unlike many of my friends who are avid snowboaders or skiers, I have most of my fun in the summer sunshine. How do I cope? Every November I begin to plan my escape and then count the days until my vacation in the sun. I have found the key is to have something to look forward to.

Many people, not unlike me, suffer from seasonal affective disorder (SAD), the seasonal depression we feel as the days grow shorter and we experience a shortage of sunlight. SAD was officially named in the 1980s, but it has been recognized for over a hundred years. Even animals react to the changing seasons with changes in mood and behavior. Many of us dread the dark mornings and short days, finding that we may eat or sleep more to compensate. But how do you know if the changes in your appetite, level of motivation or sleep patterns are normal, or if they are more concerning, like those associated with SAD?
About 4 to 6% of the population experiences SAD. It is no surprise that the incidence increases with distance from the equator, however, it is interesting to find that it is experienced less where there tends to be more snow on the ground. Women tend to experience SAD more than men. Children and teens can also be affected but it tends to be less common in people under 20.

How Do You Know if You Have SAD?
SAD symptoms include:

Sleep problems: Your sleep habits may change. You may be oversleeping but not feeling refreshed, have an inability to get out of bed or require a nap in the afternoon. We should sleep between 6 and 9 hours per night; children and teens require slightly more sleep, about 9.5 hours.

Overeating: Individuals with SAD may have increased carbohydrate cravings (a craving for sugary and/or starchy foods), leading to weight gain which further contributes to depression.

Depression: You may experience feelings of despair, misery, guilt, hopelessness or anxiety. You may find normal tasks become frustratingly difficult, you may cry for no apparent reason or be unable to concentrate.

Family problems: You may avoid company, preferring isolation. Irritability and impatience are common, as are loss of libido or loss of feeling.

Lethargy: SAD may create feelings of overwhelming fatigue, or of feeling too tired to cope. Everything becomes an effort and you may have no motivation.

Physical symptoms: Sometimes joint pain or stomach problems may manifest and you may experience lowered resistance to infection.

Behavioral problems: This tends to be more common in children and teens.

A diagnosis of SAD is fitting if your symptoms have occurred for two years or more, with no non-seasonal depression episodes. Symptoms may begin around September each year and last until April, but tend to be worst in the darkest monthsóJanuary and February. People who work in windowless environments, however, can be at risk any time of the year. Typically, full remission from seasonal depression occurs in the spring and summer months.



What Causes SAD?
Winterís short, dull days and long, dark nights cause a change in the brain's chemistry, specifically in the pineal gland. The pineal gland secretes the hormone serotonin, made from the essential (meaning we must get it from our diet) amino acid tryptophan. Some of the serotonin is then converted into melatonin. Melatonin induces sleep, but is only created when we are in complete darkness; even an area of skin on the back of the leg exposed to light will decrease production. In the long, dark days of winter, melatonin levels increase and researchers believe this increase causes the symptoms of SAD.

Treatment Options
Light therapy: Since SAD is related to a lack of light, it only makes sense that using light as a form of treatment would help reduce symptoms. Phototherapy or bright light therapy has been shown to suppress the brainís secretion of melatonin. Light devices (light visors) can be worn around the head or banks of white fluorescent lights (light boxes) on metal reflectors can be placed in the home or office. Look for full-spectrum lighting. Exposure for 30 minutes to 2 hours per day in the morning has been found to be very effective.

For mild symptoms, spending time outdoors during the day or arranging homes and workplaces to receive more sunlight may be helpful. One study found that an hour-long walk in winter sunlight was as effective as two and a half hours under bright artificial light. Vacationing in the sun will also help.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D is produced when the sunís rays hit our skin, making deficiencies common in winter. It has also been found that SAD tends to be prevalent when vitamin D stores are low. One may wonder if the light therapy discussed above works for SAD because the broad-spectrum light allows the skin to produce vitamin D. Many studies have tested the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency might play a role in SAD.

One such study was conducted on a group of 15 subjects with SAD. Eight subjects received 100,000 IU of vitamin D and seven subjects received phototherapy. At the onset of treatment and after one month of therapy subjects were administered the Hamilton Depression Scale questionnaire as a means of analysis. All subjects receiving vitamin D improved in all outcome measures. Surprisingly, the phototherapy group showed no significant change in depression scale measures. Improvement in vitamin D levels was associated with significant improvement in depression scale scores. This allows the conclusion that Vitamin D may be an important treatment for SAD.
Note: The dosage of vitamin D listed here should not be taken unless under the direction of a licensed health care provider. Many individuals report an improvement in symptoms with only vitamin D 1,000 IU per day.

Exercise: It is proven as an effective means to decrease depression and anxiety.

Eat a balanced diet: Follow a diet that is balanced with protein, carbohydrate and healthy fats, like the Truestar Nutrition Plan. Avoiding sweets and starchy foods will help break the cycle of overeating and assist with weight loss. Eating more protein often helps decrease sugar cravings.

D is interesting stuff. It is now thought of as a proto-vitamin, because other things are manufactured from it in the body. The recommended rda is 400 iu, which is what's in most multi-vitamins, but now many Doctors are advising 800 or even 1000 iu, and I think that the feds are about to increase the rda. I take 790. One other interesting fact is that the incidence of MS has a direct relationship with the latitude one lives at, and increases linearly with distance from the equator. Prostate cancer is the same way. In general, those living in the southern US have half the risk of dying of cancer than those in the North.

Also, breast, colon, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer are more rare at low latitudes. People who take 400 iu of vitamin d per day have half the incidence of pancreatic cancer as those who take none, and d has been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth.

A bit off topic here, but I find it fascinating that there might be a simple, cheap solution to so many things, including SAD.

As for getting enough d from the sun at this latitude in winter, forget it. Because of the angle of the sun and because we're bundled up, with most skin covered, it's impossible.
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#458757 --- 12/16/06 12:33 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Sparkey Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 01/07/06
Posts: 22788
Loc: Seneca Falls
Great read Smitty,lot's of info.
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#458758 --- 12/16/06 12:48 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/28/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
Thanks, Sparks! I should have added that June through Sept. I only take 400 iu, as I get mucho sun working on the boats.

Here's some more, and then I'll shut up on the subject:

Vitamin D. Getting enough vitamin D may be the most important variable in preventing osteoporosis. Vitamin Dís main function in the body is to aid calcium absorption. An analysis of data from the Nursesí Health Study found that study participants who consume 500 IU of vitamin D daily are 37% less likely to have broken a hip than women who consume 140 IU. (IU stands for International Units, a measure of biological activity.) Neither total calcium nor milk consumption was associated with a lower risk for hip fracture.

The current FDA recommendation (the Daily Value) is 400 IU daily. Studies have shown that up to 50% of older Americans donít get enough vitamin D. There are several reasons for this. The vitaminís biologically active form is metabolized when the skin is exposed to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Theoretically, sun exposure can give you all the vitamin D you need. But north of about 40 degrees latitude ó the latitude of Philadelphia, Indianapolis, and Denver ó the winter sunlight is too weak to produce significant amounts of vitamin D. Even in sunnier climes and times of year, older people tend to spend a lot of time indoors. Moreover, older skin is less effective in making the vitamin even when itís exposed to sunlight. Sunscreens are another problem: they filter out much of the ultraviolet radiation that produces vitamin D.

Theoretically, you could make up for a shortage of sunshine-generated vitamin D with diet. The problem is that precious few foods contain the vitamin. For practical purposes, itís limited to several types of saltwater fish. So decades ago, health officials in many northern countries decided to fortify foods with vitamin D. In the United States, milk ó but not other dairy foods ó was chosen. An 8-ounce glass of milk is supposed to contain 100 IU, although surveys have shown that the actual amount can be a great deal less.


Edited by VM Smith (12/16/06 12:59 AM)
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#458759 --- 12/16/06 04:09 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Sparkey Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 01/07/06
Posts: 22788
Loc: Seneca Falls
My Mom has to take 800IU of vitamin D daily,she is 74,she probably should have started sooner,maybe I should too!
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#458760 --- 12/16/06 01:06 PM Re: Seasonal Disorder
TRD_Tacoma Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/19/02
Posts: 12952
Loc: Rochester
Great information. Thanks all.
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#458761 --- 12/18/06 10:54 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
TRD_Tacoma Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/19/02
Posts: 12952
Loc: Rochester
Today is day 2 of a throbbing headache. I woke up yesterday morning and it felt like my head was going to explode. I had no energy yesterday and basically spent the entire day either in bed or napping on the sofa. To top it off, last night was one of those nights that I could not sleep. I seem to remember the last time I looked at the clock it was reading 4 am.
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It's hard for a gay man to feel bad about himself when his urologist asks him out on a date!

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#458762 --- 12/18/06 11:36 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY
Today, everything hurts. I think I pushed my luck doing some yard work yesterday, trying to play catch up and all.
On top of that, I got word today that I am having the dreaded discogram on Weds morning this week. I will be out of commision a few days to recouperate. That is not helpful at all, but is a much needed procedure to hopefully find out exactly what is happening with my lower back and get me on my feet again. Just hate the thought of being out on my back yet again, and this time, no one will be here to help with this or that. My son is in Alaska (both of them) and my daughter has her hands full with my grandson and her being pregnant. I do have freinds and family that will help. I just sometimes dread being alone here.

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#458763 --- 12/18/06 11:52 AM Re: Seasonal Disorder
TRD_Tacoma Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/19/02
Posts: 12952
Loc: Rochester
My thoughts are with you SBJ. I hate it when my back acts up. I hope the procedure isn't too bad and the recovery is quick.
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It's hard for a gay man to feel bad about himself when his urologist asks him out on a date!

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