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#1534866 --- 10/16/19 01:36 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: cwjga]
Ben444 Offline
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Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: cwjga
let it go.
You said I did something which it is obvious I did not do. That is called lying. Why should I let it go?
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#1534910 --- 10/17/19 11:57 AM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: Ben444
Let it go? I am sure you would like that since what you said is a flat out lie. I see that today is Trumps 1,000th day as president. And he has over 13,000 lies to his credit. You will never catch up.
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#1534912 --- 10/17/19 12:05 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
Formermac Offline
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Registered: 10/22/12
Posts: 18033
Loc: Above ground
Some topics aren't worth the effort by virtue, if someone ask a question, the decent thing to do is respond, When they reply by means of cartoons and memes, one already know that they didn't win the debate. A ignorant person such a cwjga is like a ghost who fail to comprehend that they are dead thus is obligated to walk the universe stuck between two entities. They call them "Lost Souls"
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#1534914 --- 10/17/19 12:13 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Formermac]
Formermac Offline
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Registered: 10/22/12
Posts: 18033
Loc: Above ground
My healthcare cost me approximately $400.00 dollars a month, if his is so much better, what's the problem submitting it's cost seeing that we all are anonymous? A huge liar is like Trump failing to submit his tax returns, if he pays so much let the public know but seeing that he's a tax cheat, the public can't be allow to see it's actuality. CWJGA fails to tell us his profession, lifestyle, marital status, kids, his education etc...why? END OF TOPIC,,,every thing moving forward on his part is a blatant lie. All else is multiple individuals with nothing else to do but DEBATE for the shear reasons of DEBATING
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I know how to bring out the buffoonery of A Trump supporter.State Fact

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#1534919 --- 10/17/19 12:22 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Formermac]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: Formermac
My healthcare cost me approximately $400.00 dollars a month,
The health insurance for me and my wife is $555 a month.
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#1534920 --- 10/17/19 12:26 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
Formermac Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 10/22/12
Posts: 18033
Loc: Above ground
The $400.00 is for me alone, my wife receives her's through the school system
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I know how to bring out the buffoonery of A Trump supporter.State Fact

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#1534921 --- 10/17/19 12:31 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Formermac]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: Formermac
The $400.00 is for me alone, my wife receives her's through the school system
Sounds about right.
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#1534922 --- 10/17/19 12:54 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Formermac]
Formermac Offline
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Registered: 10/22/12
Posts: 18033
Loc: Above ground
I'm hearing horror stories as to the cost of Medicare parts AB & D and am vastly approaching that dilemma. Seeing that the Republicans , namely Trump is spending his time doing nothing, we the Americans are faced with increases from food to automobiles.


https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-tariffs-consumer-price-effect-20190514-story.html
_________________________
I know how to bring out the buffoonery of A Trump supporter.State Fact

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#1534923 --- 10/17/19 01:07 PM Re: health care thread [Re: cwjga]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12651
Loc: NY
Even a Liberal think tank says Medicare for All Would Cost $34 Trillion Over Decade

https://www.urban.org/research/publicati...erage-and-costs



From Incremental to Comprehensive Health Reform: How Various Reform Options Compare on Coverage and Costs
Linda J. BlumbergJohn HolahanMatthew BuettgensAnuj GangopadhyayaBowen GarrettAdele ShartzerMichael SimpsonRobin WangMelissa M. FavreaultDiane ArnosOctober 16, 2019
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Abstract
Report:
From Incremental to Comprehensive Health Insurance Reform: How Various Reform Options Compare on Coverage and Costs

Brief:
Comparing Health Insurance Reform Options: From “Building on the ACA” to Single Payer

Blog Post:
Don’t Confuse Changes in Federal Health Spending with National Health Spending

Policymakers, including candidates in the 2020 presidential campaign and members of Congress, have proposed a variety of options to address the shortcomings of the current health care system. These range from improvements to the Affordable Care Act to robust single-payer reform.

There are numerous challenging trade-offs when choosing an approach to health care reform, including covering the uninsured, improving the affordability of health care, and raising the government funding required to implement them. The public and policymakers alike need more information about the potential effects of various health reform proposals.

This study, funded by the Commonwealth Fund, analyzes eight health care reforms and their potential effects on health insurance coverage and spending. Each of the analyzed reform proposals makes health insurance considerably more affordable by reducing people’s premiums and cost sharing. Some reforms also reduce US health care costs, and all require additional federal dollars.

Key findings:

Within the existing public-private health care system, near universal coverage and improved affordability could be achieved with moderate increases in national health spending. Under one of the plans modeled in the report, which proposes a mix of private and public health insurance, everyone in the US could be covered except for undocumented immigrants. The plan would enable workers to opt for subsidized nongroup coverage instead of their employer’s insurance plan. It would also improve the ACA’s subsidies to help people afford coverage, cover people in states that have not expanded Medicaid, require everyone to have insurance with an auto-enrollment backup, offer a public insurance option, and cap provider payment rates.

Coverage and costs:
This reform plan achieves universal coverage for people legally present in the US, covering 25.6 million people who would otherwise be uninsured. However, the plan leaves 6.6. million undocumented immigrants without coverage. National spending on health care would decrease modestly, by $22.6 billion or 0.6 percent, compared with current law in 2020. Federal government spending would increase by $122.1 billion in 2020, or $1.5 trillion over 10 years.
One single-payer approach would leave no one uninsured and largely eliminate consumers’ out-of-pocket medical costs but would require much greater federal spending to finance. The modeled “enhanced” single-payer system would cover everyone, including undocumented immigrants. The reform would include benefits more comprehensive than Medicare’s—including adult dental, vision, hearing, and long-term services and supports—with no premiums or cost sharing. All current forms of insurance for acute care would be eliminated, including private insurance, Medicaid, and Medicare, and everyone residing in the US would be covered by a new public insurance program. Providers would be paid rates closer to Medicare’s. Health spending by employers would be eliminated, and household and state health spending would decline considerably while federal spending would increase significantly.

Coverage and costs:
This reform option covers the entire US population. National spending on health care would grow by about $720 billion in 2020. Federal government spending would increase by $2.8 trillion in 2020, or $34.0 trillion over 10 years.
A second single-payer approach can be constructed with lower federal and system-wide costs. In addition to the enhanced single-payer plan above, researchers examined a single-payer “lite” plan that is similar to the enhanced version but includes cost sharing for out-of-pocket expenses based on income, adds fewer new covered benefits, and only covers legally residing US residents. Single-payer “lite” lowers total national health spending, decreasing health spending by households, employers, and state governments and increasing federal government spending by less than the enhanced single-payer reform.

Coverage and costs:
This reform plan achieves universal coverage for people legally present in the US, covering 25.6 million people who were uninsured. However, the plan leaves all 10.8 million undocumented immigrants without coverage (due to the elimination of private insurance). National spending on health care would decrease by $209.5 billion, or 6 percent, in 2020. Federal government spending would increase by $1.5 trillion in 2020, or by $17.6 trillion over 10 years. The analysis demonstrates that there is more than one effective approach to achieving universal health care coverage in the United States and highlights the trade-offs of different reform strategies.

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#1534925 --- 10/17/19 01:21 PM Re: health care thread [Re: cwjga]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Even a Liberal think tank says Medicare for All Would Cost $34 Trillion Over Decade

https://www.urban.org/research/publicati...erage-and-costs
I am not in favor of Medicare for All. I think it would be better if Medicare was available to all who have no health insurance from someplace else now. Therefore the only increase to health insurance cost would be to cover those with no health insurance now as all advanced countries do.
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#1534926 --- 10/17/19 01:22 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: Ben444
Originally Posted By: cwjga
let it go.
You said I did something which it is obvious I did not do. That is called lying. Why should I let it go?
.
_________________________
Trump asked if he could pardon himself!

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#1534928 --- 10/17/19 01:59 PM Re: health care thread [Re: cwjga]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Within the existing public-private health care system, near universal coverage and improved affordability could be achieved with moderate increases in national health spending. Under one of the plans modeled in the report, which proposes a mix of private and public health insurance, everyone in the US could be covered except for undocumented immigrants. The plan would enable workers to opt for subsidized nongroup coverage instead of their employer’s insurance plan. It would also improve the ACA’s subsidies to help people afford coverage, cover people in states that have not expanded Medicaid, require everyone to have insurance with an auto-enrollment backup, offer a public insurance option, and cap provider payment rates.
What is wrong this approach? It sound easy to implement and relatively inexpensive.


Edited by Ben444 (10/17/19 02:00 PM)
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#1535011 --- 10/18/19 12:31 PM Re: health care thread [Re: Ben444]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12651
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: Ben444
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Within the existing public-private health care system, near universal coverage and improved affordability could be achieved with moderate increases in national health spending. Under one of the plans modeled in the report, which proposes a mix of private and public health insurance, everyone in the US could be covered except for undocumented immigrants. The plan would enable workers to opt for subsidized nongroup coverage instead of their employer’s insurance plan. It would also improve the ACA’s subsidies to help people afford coverage, cover people in states that have not expanded Medicaid, require everyone to have insurance with an auto-enrollment backup, offer a public insurance option, and cap provider payment rates.
What is wrong this approach? It sound easy to implement and relatively inexpensive.


It does nothing to improve the affordability of Health insurance. In fact, it does just the opposite just as the ACA did.

We currently have a combination of private and public health coverage, just like most countries. WE have Medicaid that covers the poor and private plans for everyone else.

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#1535047 --- 10/20/19 11:22 AM Re: health care thread [Re: cwjga]
Timbo Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 07/18/12
Posts: 14706
Loc: CNY
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Originally Posted By: Ben444
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Within the existing public-private health care system, near universal coverage and improved affordability could be achieved with moderate increases in national health spending. Under one of the plans modeled in the report, which proposes a mix of private and public health insurance, everyone in the US could be covered except for undocumented immigrants. The plan would enable workers to opt for subsidized nongroup coverage instead of their employer’s insurance plan. It would also improve the ACA’s subsidies to help people afford coverage, cover people in states that have not expanded Medicaid, require everyone to have insurance with an auto-enrollment backup, offer a public insurance option, and cap provider payment rates.
What is wrong this approach? It sound easy to implement and relatively inexpensive.


It does nothing to improve the affordability of Health insurance. In fact, it does just the opposite just as the ACA did.

We currently have a combination of private and public health coverage, just like most countries. WE have Medicaid that covers the poor and private plans for everyone else.

D*mn, Cwiggy, You don't know the first thing about the resultant effects of The ACA, do you?

Not only have premiums dropped significantly for the targeted mid-income insured, but 20 million additional Americans are now covered. Vallue-based preventative health care has improved dramatically across the board, and forgive me for pointing out that the states that refused associated federal funds are also the states with the highest increases in both policy and deductibles rates.

Just sayin'.
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#1535051 --- 10/20/19 07:50 PM Re: health care thread [Re: Timbo]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
https://www.yahoo.com/news/republicans-still-no-clue-help-090011002.html

Republicans still have no clue how to help Americans that Obamacare left behind


People with serious health problems shouldn’t go without care or face financial ruin. Healthy individuals should have options in the individual health insurance market that are good, rather than lousy, deals.

If Republicans aren’t willing to propose, and publicly advocate, credible alternatives to accomplish both, the march toward government being the health care provider for all will steadily advance.
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#1535096 --- 10/22/19 07:09 AM Re: health care thread [Re: cwjga]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12651
Loc: NY
Wisconsin Is Putting Health Care Consumers Back in Driver’s Seat
State Sen. Dale Kooyenga|Posted: Oct 21, 2019 12:02 PM



One of the most important challenges facing lawmakers today at both the state and federal levels is the rising cost of health care. In the great debate over how to reduce costs while increasing access and quality, some politicians seem to believe that more government involvement is the ticket to accomplishing these policy goals.

I believe the opposite is true. In several ways, misguided government intervention is actually the cause of many of our problems, and the solution is to restore an arms-length relationship between government and the doctor-patient relationship.

In Wisconsin, I’ve been part of a group of legislators who understand the proper role of government is to stay in the background, setting sensible rules of the road and getting out of the way. We also understand that there is no silver bullet or thousand-page omnibus bill that will solve our health care problems, but instead that real progress will be accomplished one reform at a time.

Incremental, consumer-oriented reform is what we’re working on quietly but persistently in the Badger State.

One of those reforms drags government-run health care into the 21st century. All you have to do is pick up your smartphone to notice how fast technology is changing, but government programs have little incentive to keep pace.

That’s why I authored a bill to expand the use of telehealth in Wisconsin. The bill requires Medicaid to cover a variety of telehealth procedures in an effort to streamline and modernize the program. Telehealth, which can include examinations, consultations, and some procedures performed remotely using technology, is a big step toward increasing health care access by allowing people to receive medical care in their homes and finding efficiencies to reduce costs.

The same principle applies to dental care, where government policies impede the innovation of teledentistry. In some cases there isn’t a need to physically visit the dentist, like for a simple diagnosis. Technology could also allow a dentist to remotely examine records to determine if additional work is required. There’s no telling what will be possible in the future. I’m currently working on a teledentistry bill with the aim of removing government-imposed barriers to this innovation.

Government also gets in the way of progress through occupational licensure, which can be used to keep new business models from developing. One business model in dentistry that’s relatively new to America is the profession of dental therapy, a type of mid-level dental professional that’s often compared to a nurse practitioner in medicine.

Dental therapists are authorized to perform more procedures than a hygienist, thereby freeing the dentist to focus on providing more advanced care to a larger number patients, reducing wait times. A dental therapy bill circulating now will allow dental therapists to be licensed in Wisconsin, growing the dental workforce and increasing access to dental care.

Similarly, expanding the scope of practice of physician assistants, pharmacists and other health care providers can increase access and competition, thereby lowering prices. Where there is clear evidence that there is no additional risk to patients, relaxing restrictions on certain medical professionals is just common sense.

The mere threat of government interference can also discourage innovations like direct primary care, an arrangement where a patient pays a flat monthly fee directly to a primary care doctor. In exchange, the patient gets a set menu of services that covers the vast majority of a typical person’s health care needs with up-front, transparent pricing. These arrangements often cost less than insurance—usually less than $75 a month—and offer significantly lower out-of-pocket costs and facilitate an old-fashioned doctor-patient relationship.

A simple but important bill making its way through the Wisconsin legislature codifies into state law that DPC arrangements are not insurance—they’re actually an entirely different way of financing health care, therefore outside the grasp of insurance regulators. This bill will provide long-term certainty to enterprising doctors interested in venturing out and starting a direct primary care practice, but who may be nervous about the risk posed by possible future regulations.


Poor government policy impacts health care indirectly, too. For example, under current Wisconsin law, a person going through bankruptcy can have their health or medical savings accounts liquidated by a court. Putting someone’s access to health care in jeopardy simply because of a bankruptcy is bad policy.

Another example comes in the arena of cancer clinical trials, which are the best way to ascertain the effectiveness of a new, potentially life-saving treatment. Unfortunately, financial barriers often block people from taking part—about 20 percent of clinical trials fail due to lack of participation. Repealing outdated laws that forbid companies that conduct these trials from reimbursing participants for out-of-pocket costs incurred as a result of their participation removes one more government-imposed barrier to progress.

To be sure, none of these bills or others passed in Wisconsin in recent years is a magic wand that will fix a very broken health care system overnight. But as we saw in the years following the Affordable Care Act’s enactment, massive pieces of legislation that explode the role of government and insert politics into something as important as our health care are doomed to backfire.

There’s no shortage of good, free-market reforms that encourage innovation and competition by minimizing government’s role in health care. State and federal lawmakers can achieve the goals of reduced costs, increased access, and better quality by ditching expensive schemes like “Medicare for All” and getting to work on reforms that put the consumer behind the wheel and keeps the government in its place—the back seat.

Dale Kooyenga is a Republican state senator from Wisconsin’s 5th District, covering portions of the Milwaukee suburbs and the city of Milwaukee.

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#1535102 --- 10/22/19 11:05 AM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: Ben444
Originally Posted By: cwjga
let it go.
You said I did something which it is obvious I did not do. That is called lying. Why should I let it go?
A liar just like Trump.
_________________________
Trump asked if he could pardon himself!

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#1535103 --- 10/22/19 11:06 AM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
Ben444 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 09/12/18
Posts: 13813
Loc: Seneca County
https://www.rawstory.com/2019/10/failure...tional-scholar/

Failure to immediately impeach Trump ‘puts the republic in grave danger’: constitutional scholar
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Trump asked if he could pardon himself!

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#1535110 --- 10/22/19 01:13 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: Ben444]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12651
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: Ben444
You said I did something which it is obvious I did not do. That is called lying. Why should I let it go?



Originally Posted By: Ben444
https://www.rawstory.com/2019/10/failure...tional-scholar/

Failure to immediately impeach Trump ‘puts the republic in grave danger’: constitutional scholar


And then you go and do exactly what you are accused of. You must be a Dem.

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#1535112 --- 10/22/19 01:21 PM Re: Bens health care thread [Re: cwjga]
Timbo Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 07/18/12
Posts: 14706
Loc: CNY

Premiums for popular Obamacare plans to drop 4% (up to double digit reductions in certain states) exactly as originally projected when signed into law:

Premiums for key plans sold on HealthCare.gov will drop by 4 percent on average next year, with several states seeing double-digit declines. This marks the second straight year that the so-called benchmark premium has dropped and is a further sign that the Obamacare insurance marketplaces are stabilizing

Story:
https://www.politico.com/news/2019/10/22/obamacare-premiums-drop-054262
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