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#1501847 --- 07/18/17 10:38 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 1921
Originally Posted By: kyle585
The House and Senate are controlled by the Republican Party. At least till next year that is.

The president is the strangest duck we have ever seen in that office. He used to be a Democrat. He has zero party loyalty. His only interest seems to be in increasing his bank account by another billion or so.

His obvious loyalty to the Russian leader is astounding. Putin has got to be blackmailing him over something. With Trumps great interest in women, I got to believe that is behind the blackmail.

It makes the Republicans in congress very nervous. Every one of them I am sure. They don’t speak out against him very often because they want him to sign bills they pass. If they can’t pass bills they may decide he is of no value and desert him.

I got to think that President Pence looks better to them every day although they dare not say so yet. I hope Trump hangs around in his weakened state until Nov 18 when it looks more likely every day the Dems will take the House. And after this health care debacle I am not sure the Senate is out of reach.
Probably the DEMS will do as good as they did in the special elections Kyle! LOL!

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#1501865 --- 07/19/17 03:42 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: gassy one]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
From the Washington Post

*********************************************************

2nd undisclosed meeting between Trump and Putin:

The second meeting, unreported at the time, took place at a dinner for Group of 20 leaders, a senior administration official said. Halfway through the meal, President Trump left his seat to occupy an empty chair next to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Trump was alone, and Putin was attended only by his official interpreter.

**********************************************************

The Take
Analysis
A party at war with itself hits a wall on health care
There is no way to spin to those who were promised repeal and replacement that this failure isn’t the party’s fault, and it will surely affect the mood of the GOP’s base heading into 2018.

By Dan Balz

************************************************************

Senate GOP all but admits defeat in 7-year quest to overturn ACA
Hours after Republicans abandoned a bill to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, their fallback plan — to repeal major parts of the law without replacing them — quickly imploded.
The effort’s collapse marks a devastating political defeat for Republicans, and it leaves millions of consumers who receive insurance through the law known as Obamacare in a kind of administrative limbo.

By Juliet Eilperin, Sean Sullivan and Ed O'Keefe

‘It’s an insane process’: How Trump and Republicans failed on their health-care bill
As the legislation was about to collapse Monday evening, President Trump talked about his trip to Paris as he dined with supportive lawmakers.

By Robert Costa, Kelsey Snell and Sean Sullivan

The Fix: White House dinner is a case study in Trump’s inability to close deal
@PKCapitol: Senators pushed Trump to sidelines. He happily stayed there. Now they pay.
Wonkblog: Trump contradicted by his own past tweets

**********************************************************

The Fix
Analysis
Breitbart’s White House reporter is trying to hold Trump accountable. Seriously.
Charlie Spiering is monitoring the president's follow-through on the promises he made to his base and occasionally calling him out for not delivering.

By Callum Borchers
*******************************************************

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#1501866 --- 07/19/17 04:07 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Hillary Clinton is even less popular now than when she was running for president.

Just 39 percent of Americans view Clinton favorably, according to a Bloomberg national poll conducted last week and released on Monday. A year ago, when Clinton was the presumptive Democratic nominee, her favorability was at 43 percent. The former secretary of state is viewed slightly more negatively than President Donald Trump, who has historically low poll numbers for a president this early in his administration.

That puts Clinton at odds with every losing presidential candidate since 1992. Except for Clinton, the defeated candidate saw an increase in favorability ratings after Election Day, according to Gallup data.

The Bloomberg poll didn’t get into reasons for Clinton’s decline in favorability. But there is, of course, one thing that sets her apart from the pack of failed candidates: Clinton is a woman.

In follow-up interviews, Bloomberg poll respondents said their negative feelings about Clinton had nothing to do with her loss. Instead, they emphasized how unlikable they consider Clinton &#8213; echoing the opinions of many voters during the 2016 campaign.

“She did not feel authentic or genuine to me,” Chris Leininger, 29, an insurance agent from Fountain Valley, California, told Bloomberg. “She was hard to like.”

That’s neither an unusual nor a surprising sentiment. Women with strong ambitions and opinions typically take a likability hit, Colleen Ammerman

A mountain of research on women leaders has found that the idea of a powerful woman runs counter to most people’s expectations for what’s considered feminine; quiet, supportive, nurturing and definitely not ambitious.

The disconnect puts female leaders in what’s known as the double-bind &#8213; strong bosses are penalized for not acting “like women,” and those who lean the other way and try to display more characteristically feminine traits are penalized for being weak leaders.

Clinton’s probably the best-known example of this phenomenon. She’s been criticized for being too loud, but also for smiling too much.

In the past, Clinton’s favorability ratings tended to go up when she was not actively running for office. In December 2012, when she was secretary of state, 70 percent of Americans viewed Clinton positively, according to Bloomberg.

But since her loss in November, Clinton has stayed in the public eye and has continued to voice her opinions. That’s likely stoked anxiety and discomfort among Americans, Ammerman said.

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#1501867 --- 07/19/17 04:10 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trum...kushpmg00000067

Trump’s Plan To ‘Let Obamacare Fail’ Is Morally Appalling
Donald Trump is president now and it’s his job to run this government, whether he likes it or not.

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#1501868 --- 07/19/17 04:31 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Meet the 53 angriest people in Washington

Trump and Republican senators are the 53 angriest people in Washington

The GOP turned into the Grouchy Old Party, as recriminations flew after the failure this week to repeal and replace Obamacare -- the greatest motivating cause of Republican voters for more than seven years.
Soon after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell admitted defeat Tuesday in his bid to jam the bill through the Senate, President Donald Trump, different factions on Capitol Hill and outside conservative activists started assigning fault for the legislation's collapse.

The defeat of McConnell's initiative, raised questions not just over the future of American health care, but the cohesion of the Republican majority itself, as the GOP, united in opposition, finds it tougher to be a credible governing force.
For years, hopes of repealing the Affordable Care Act have kept a fractious party united in Washington. Now, with responsibility for Americans' health care coverage resting solely with Republican lawmakers that is no longer the case and Trump and McConnell could not even secure 50 votes in the Senate for the repeal and replace bill.

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#1501869 --- 07/19/17 04:37 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
http://www.politico.com/story/2017/07/19/medicaid-shows-its-political-clout-240699?lo=ap_a1

Medicaid shows its political clout

The fight to protect health care entitlement is driving the Obamacare repeal struggle in the Senate.

By Rachana Pradhan 07/19/2017 05:15 AM EDT

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#1501870 --- 07/19/17 04:43 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
http://www.politico.com/story/2017/07/18/irakly-kaveladze-trump-tower-russia-eighth-man-240679

Eighth person in Trump Tower meeting was linked to money laundering

Irakly Kaveladze, who met with Trump Jr. and Kushner, is linked to a Kremlin-friendly Russian oligarch through a network of shell companies.

By Kyle Cheney , Darren Samuelsohn and Ryan Hutchins
07/18/2017 02:59 PM EDT

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#1501904 --- 07/19/17 05:23 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2...tesa/489612001/

Tellingly, the latest and perhaps last Republican strategy on health care is a measure that would repeal the Affordable Care Act in two years with no replacement in sight.

So much for repeal-and-replace. Republicans did not have a viable alternative to the ACA when they staged their first repeal vote seven years ago. They don’t now, and in all probability would not in two years even if the repeal measure were to pass.

They don’t have a plan because meaningful reform ideas are few and far between and involve tough political choices. And they don’t because the ACA, in many respects, grew out of Republican plans from the 1990s and early 2000s.

By trying to kill the law, first with the specious argument that they had something better and now without any such pretense, Republicans have left themselves in a bind. They’ve moved the goal posts so far that they have run out of playing field.

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#1501913 --- 07/19/17 10:17 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 1921
Originally Posted By: kyle585
https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2...tesa/489612001/

Tellingly, the latest and perhaps last Republican strategy on health care is a measure that would repeal the Affordable Care Act in two years with no replacement in sight.

So much for repeal-and-replace. Republicans did not have a viable alternative to the ACA when they staged their first repeal vote seven years ago. They don’t now, and in all probability would not in two years even if the repeal measure were to pass.

They don’t have a plan because meaningful reform ideas are few and far between and involve tough political choices. And they don’t because the ACA, in many respects, grew out of Republican plans from the 1990s and early 2000s.

By trying to kill the law, first with the specious argument that they had something better and now without any such pretense, Republicans have left themselves in a bind. They’ve moved the goal posts so far that they have run out of playing field.
It's like everything else nobody wants their handout cut!

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#1501943 --- 07/20/17 05:35 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: gassy one]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Wow. A Fox news poll shows America doesn't agree with gassy. hehe

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/07/...ealth-care.html

Republican lawmakers are well aware they need to fulfill their seven-years-and-counting promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

A clear reminder came in November, when more than eight in ten of those who voted for Donald Trump said ObamaCare “went too far,” according to the Fox News Exit Poll.

Yet a Fox News Poll taken Sunday through Tuesday finds support continues to fall for the GOP plans being offered to replace President Obama’s signature law. Only 25 percent of voters favor the Senate’s latest health care bill (which was pulled late Monday). That’s a bit less than the 27 percent who favored last month’s Senate draft, and falls considerably short of the 40 percent who supported the House bill in May.

Among Republicans, a narrow majority, 52 percent, favors the second Senate bill, down from 75 percent support for the House overhaul in May.

If the existing law isn’t repealed, 47 percent of all voters, and a hefty 40 percent of Republicans, say congressional Republicans deserve all or most of the blame.

Monday night, after learning he wouldn’t have the votes to pass a replacement bill, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he will move forward with just repeal.

Voters have a different idea. Six in 10 want to keep ObamaCare and make it better (60 percent). Far fewer, 33 percent, prefer throwing it out and starting over.

A 63 percent majority wants changes made so more people have health insurance, even if it increases government spending. That’s more than twice the number who want the changes to focus on cutting spending, even if it means some people lose insurance (27 percent).

Plus, 74 percent want GOP lawmakers to reach out to Democrats and try to find a compromise. That includes 86 percent of Democrats and 59 percent of Republicans.

President Trump receives his lowest marks on handling health care. Thirty-two percent of voters approve, while 59 percent disapprove. That matters when your party is trying to do a major legislative overhaul on the issue.

In addition, of 10 issues tested, more voters are concerned about health care (82 percent) than any other. It not only tops worry about the economy (75 percent), but it also edges out concern over the “future of the country” (81 percent).

Here’s part of the struggle McConnell faces in replacing the health care law: two-thirds of those in favor of the Senate’s second bill say they like it because it gets rid of ObamaCare (67 percent). At the same time, two-thirds of those opposed say they dislike it because it gets rid of ObamaCare (66 percent).

Meanwhile, the ongoing battle is taking a toll on Republicans. In 2014, voters were equally frustrated with both sides of the aisle (44 percent each). The new poll shows that by a 9-point margin, more are extremely or very “frustrated and upset” with congressional Republicans (57 percent) than with congressional Democrats (48 percent).

More voters feel “extremely” frustrated with Trump (37 percent) than congressional Republicans (33 percent), congressional Democrats (24 percent) or the news media (27 percent).

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#1502014 --- 07/20/17 10:03 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 1921
Originally Posted By: kyle585
Wow. A Fox news poll shows America doesn't agree with gassy. hehe

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/07/...ealth-care.html

Republican lawmakers are well aware they need to fulfill their seven-years-and-counting promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

A clear reminder came in November, when more than eight in ten of those who voted for Donald Trump said ObamaCare “went too far,” according to the Fox News Exit Poll.

Yet a Fox News Poll taken Sunday through Tuesday finds support continues to fall for the GOP plans being offered to replace President Obama’s signature law. Only 25 percent of voters favor the Senate’s latest health care bill (which was pulled late Monday). That’s a bit less than the 27 percent who favored last month’s Senate draft, and falls considerably short of the 40 percent who supported the House bill in May.

Among Republicans, a narrow majority, 52 percent, favors the second Senate bill, down from 75 percent support for the House overhaul in May.

If the existing law isn’t repealed, 47 percent of all voters, and a hefty 40 percent of Republicans, say congressional Republicans deserve all or most of the blame.

Monday night, after learning he wouldn’t have the votes to pass a replacement bill, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he will move forward with just repeal.

Voters have a different idea. Six in 10 want to keep ObamaCare and make it better (60 percent). Far fewer, 33 percent, prefer throwing it out and starting over.

A 63 percent majority wants changes made so more people have health insurance, even if it increases government spending. That’s more than twice the number who want the changes to focus on cutting spending, even if it means some people lose insurance (27 percent).

Plus, 74 percent want GOP lawmakers to reach out to Democrats and try to find a compromise. That includes 86 percent of Democrats and 59 percent of Republicans.

President Trump receives his lowest marks on handling health care. Thirty-two percent of voters approve, while 59 percent disapprove. That matters when your party is trying to do a major legislative overhaul on the issue.

In addition, of 10 issues tested, more voters are concerned about health care (82 percent) than any other. It not only tops worry about the economy (75 percent), but it also edges out concern over the “future of the country” (81 percent).

Here’s part of the struggle McConnell faces in replacing the health care law: two-thirds of those in favor of the Senate’s second bill say they like it because it gets rid of ObamaCare (67 percent). At the same time, two-thirds of those opposed say they dislike it because it gets rid of ObamaCare (66 percent).

Meanwhile, the ongoing battle is taking a toll on Republicans. In 2014, voters were equally frustrated with both sides of the aisle (44 percent each). The new poll shows that by a 9-point margin, more are extremely or very “frustrated and upset” with congressional Republicans (57 percent) than with congressional Democrats (48 percent).

More voters feel “extremely” frustrated with Trump (37 percent) than congressional Republicans (33 percent), congressional Democrats (24 percent) or the news media (27 percent).
I think this poll shows you are wrong Kyle!


Poll Results At this point, which party are you more likely to support in the 2018 midterms?

40%
Democrats
39%
Republicans
15%
Neither
6%
I’m not sure

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#1502031 --- 07/21/17 01:09 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: gassy one]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Originally Posted By: gassy one
I think this poll shows you are wrong Kyle!


Poll Results At this point, which party are you more likely to support in the 2018 midterms?

40%
Democrats
39%
Republicans
15%
Neither
6%
I’m not sure
Don't you realize this poll shows the Dems wining? Wow.

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#1502070 --- 07/21/17 11:31 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Yes you do and will for a long time. From Fox news.

http://insider.foxnews.com/2017/07/21/te...place-obamacare

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) still believes his Senate colleagues can come together and pass a bill to replace ObamaCare.

"I think there is a path to get to 'yes.' I think we're close," he said, adding that Republicans cannot fail after promising this to the American people for years.

"The voters should hold us accountable. If we fail to get this done, I think collectively as Republicans we look like fools."

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#1502092 --- 07/21/17 03:39 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Wow. I think our heated political environment is going to get a whole lot worse soon.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/politics/scaramucci-trump-spicer/index.html

What that staff shuffle tells us about President Donald Trump is a lot more than you might think.

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#1502124 --- 07/22/17 05:18 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
http://www.thedailybeast.com/president-t...llo-had-to-quit

Mark Corallo, who had spent months defending President Donald Trump as spokesperson for his personal legal team—headed by longtime Trump attorney Marc Kasowitz—confirmed to The Daily Beast on Friday morning that he resigned. He didn’t provide any detail on his reasons.

But people who have known Corallo for years said the president’s New York Times interview, where he questioned Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ integrity, meant he had no choice but to leave.

“To people who know him, his choice to leave was unavoidable on a moral and professional level,” said a longtime friend of Corallo’s.

“Anyone with Mark’s professional capabilities would have seen The New York Times interview was a debilitating P.R. calamity,” the friend added. “To direct broadsides on Mueller and the A.G. is going to be impossible from which to recover, and Corallo certainly would have known that. It makes total sense that he got out of dodge. He’s always had tremendous political instincts.”

Another person who has known Corallo professionally for years said he couldn’t keep working on the president’s defense team after that interview.

“It’s the most unprofessional thing Trump has done to date, getting in Sessions’ ass and getting in Mueller’s ass,” the longtime colleague said. “You can’t do that. There’s no attorney in the world that’s going to want a client that’s doing that. First of all, it’s impetuous. But in addition to that, it makes the legal defense team, including Corallo, look really bad, because a lawyer would never advise their client to do that. And if you don’t make a stand on that, then tacitly, you agree with it.”

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#1502139 --- 07/22/17 09:35 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 1921
Originally Posted By: kyle585
Wow. I think our heated political environment is going to get a whole lot worse soon.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/politics/scaramucci-trump-spicer/index.html

What that staff shuffle tells us about President Donald Trump is a lot more than you might think.
Like there wasn't any under Obama!

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#1504021 --- 08/24/17 11:11 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: gassy one]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
https://www.yahoo.com/news/donald-trump-just-retweeted-world-141127381.html

Nicole Gallucci,Mashable 1 hour 55 minutes ago

Donald Trump has proven to have absolutely zero restraint or common sense when it comes to his social media posts, but today he took the his Twitter habit to a whole new level.

On Thursday morning, the U.S. president retweeted an eclipse meme of himself, as a white president, "eclipsing" Barack Obama, the nation's first black president.

It's a retweet so dumb that it may just beat the time he retweeted someone calling him a fascist.

The meme, posted by a user in response to a Trump tweet about Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, shows a smiling Trump gradually moving in front of a black and white photograph of Obama.

In the last of the four photos, Trump is completely covering Obama, and the words "THE BEST ECLIPSE EVER!" caption the meme.

Yes, this really happened.

Here it is, screenshotted on his profile, just in case Trump deletes it and has a White House official say the image was "inadvertently posted" again. You know, like he did that time he tweeted a meme of a Trump Train driving into a CNN reporter

Since this retweet shows Trump doesn't have any understanding of how an eclipse works, furious Twitter users were eager to compare Obama to the bright sun, while also pointing out that the meme is straight-up racist.

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#1504156 --- 08/27/17 09:01 AM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
gassy one Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/27/16
Posts: 1921
That's funny! LOL!

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#1504333 --- 08/31/17 01:31 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: gassy one]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 15732
Loc: Somewhere out there
Somebody posted this on Twitter but I can't find it again:

Quote:
Trump giving a speech on cutting his own taxes while Texas drowns is the most Republican thing that has ever been done.

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#1504340 --- 08/31/17 08:48 PM Re: "fundamental meanness" [Re: kyle585]
ThomasDecker Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 08/17/16
Posts: 1638
Loc: Saint Regis
Originally Posted By: kyle585
Somebody posted this on Twitter but I can't find it again:

Quote:
Trump giving a speech on cutting his own taxes while Texas drowns is the most Republican thing that has ever been done.




Quote:
Somebody posted this on Twitter


Are you getting your Hot News Tips off twitter now? Or are you one of the many, minor Fake News sources...Kyle?
_________________________
Igy6 You Leftists have tried everything to de-legitimize our duly-elected president.

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