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#1479953 --- 12/18/15 07:57 AM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End

Remembering the west coast road trip of '81.
Ride the Wind JT.



John Trudell, Outspoken Advocate for American Indians, Is Dead at 69

NYT
Bruce Weber
DEC. 9, 2015


John Trudell, whose outspokenness and charisma made him a leading advocate of Native American rights, and who channeled his message of righteous defiance into poetry and songwriting, died on Tuesday at his home in Santa Clara County, Calif. He was 69.

The cause was cancer, said Cree Miller, the trustee of Mr. Trudell’s estate.

Mr. Trudell, a Santee Dakota, was national chairman of the American Indian Movement during much of the 1970s, a turbulent stretch in the relationship between Native American activists and the federal government.

His tenure began after the episode at Wounded Knee, S.D., where, in February 1973, Oglala Lakota from the Pine Ridge reservation, incensed by tribal corruption, and American Indian Movement activists, protesting the government’s treatment of their people, occupied the town in a 71-day standoff with federal marshals and F.B.I. agents.

Three men — Bob Robideau, Darelle Butler and Leonard Peltier — were tried in the killing of two agents during a confrontation in Oglala, S.D., two years later.
Photo
Mr. Trudell in 2005. Credit Carlo Allegri/Getty Images

Mr. Trudell — “the most eloquent speaker in the Movement,” as Peter Matthiessen wrote in “In the Spirit of Crazy Horse,” his 1983 book about the siege — held community meetings in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where the trial of Mr. Robideau and Mr. Butler was held, and he testified for the defense. The two men were acquitted. Mr. Peltier, tried later, was convicted and remains in prison.

But well before that, Mr. Trudell had already made a name for himself as an effective champion of his people, decrying the indignities they had suffered for more than a century at the hands of the American government.

In November 1972, he was among the leaders of a group that occupied the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, demanding the enforcement of historical treaties that granted Native Americans sovereignty over their land.

Perhaps most famously, in 1969, he joined an occupation of Alcatraz Island, home of the former prison in San Francisco Bay, arguing that the terms of an old treaty gave American Indians the right to unused federal land.

The occupiers, calling themselves Indians of All Tribes, held the island for 19 months, demanding that they be given the right to develop it as a cultural and education center. Mr. Trudell, then in his 20s, emerged as the group’s spokesman, frequently delivering a broadcast called “Radio Free Alcatraz” and speaking at news conferences.

Rejecting a government proposal that the island be turned into a park with “maximum Indian qualities,” Mr. Trudell said: “We will no longer be museum pieces, tourist attractions and politicians’ playthings. There will be no park on this island because it changes the whole meaning of what we are here for.”

The F.B.I. compiled a substantial file on him.

In 1979, Mr. Trudell burned an American flag on the steps of the F.B.I. building in Washington, saying that the flag had been desecrated by the government’s behavior toward American Indians and other minorities, and that burning was the appropriate way to dispose of a desecrated flag.


The next day, his home in Nevada burned to the ground. The fire killed his pregnant wife, Tina Manning, who was also an activist, as well as their three children and Ms. Manning’s mother.

An investigation by the Bureau of Indian Affairs found that the fire was an accident. But some viewed the inquiry as perfunctory, and its findings were questioned by an investigator hired by Mr. Trudell, who suspected the fire had been deliberately set.

“I don’t want to say that the F.B.I. kills innocent kids and children,” Lindsey Manning, a cousin of Tina Manning, said in “Trudell,” an acclaimed 2005 documentary film by Heather Rae. “I just don’t want to say that. But you never know. You never know.”

The film asserted that the cause of the fire had never been established.

John Francis Trudell was born in Omaha on Feb. 15, 1946, and grew up partly there and partly on a reservation near the South Dakota border. His father, Clifford Trudell, was a Santee Dakota; his mother, the former Ricarda Almanza, was of Mexican-Indian descent. She died when John was a boy.

Mr. Trudell dropped out of high school and served in the Navy during the Vietnam War. Afterward, he moved to Southern California, where he studied radio and communications at a community college before joining the Indians of All Tribes group on Alcatraz.

Mr. Trudell began to distance himself from the American Indian Movement after the fire at his house, and in the 1980s, he turned to writing. He published several volumes of poetry, including “Stickman” and “Lines From a Mined Mind,” often writing in protest of corporate power and government oppression. He also recorded spoken-word albums accompanied by traditional Native American music as well as contemporary pop. His latest album, “Wazi’s Dream,” was released this year.

The recordings earned him admirers in the music world, including Bob Dylan, Jackson Browne and Kris Kristofferson.

Mr. Trudell also acted in feature films, including “Thunderheart” (1992), with Sam Shepard and Val Kilmer, in which he played a character drawn from a crucial figure in the events leading to Wounded Knee; and “Smoke Signals” (1998), based on a collection of short stories by Sherman Alexie.

Mr. Trudell’s first marriage, to Fenicia Ordonez, ended in divorce. He is survived by a brother, Roger, and several children and grandchildren. Ms. Miller, his estate’s trustee, declined to say specifically where Mr. Trudell lived in Santa Clara County.

“If this is the land of the free,” Mr. Trudell said during the occupation of Alcatraz, summarizing the issue that would propel his life and work from then on, “we want to know why we don’t have the respect and dignity that all free men are accorded by other free men.”

Correction: December 11, 2015
Because of an editing error, an obituary on Thursday about the Native American activist John Trudell referred incorrectly to the trials of his fellow activists Bob Robideau, Darelle Butler and Leonard Peltier. They were tried in the killing of two F.B.I. agents during a confrontation in Oglala, S.D., in 1975 — not during the occupation of Wounded Knee, S.D., in 1973.

Correction: December 14, 2015
An obituary on Thursday about John Trudell, a leading advocate of Native American rights, misstated the source material for the movie “Smoke Signals” in which Mr. Trudell had a role. It was based on a collection of short stories by Sherman Alexie, not on a novel by Mr. Alexie.


http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/10/us/joh...dead-at-69.html
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1479969 --- 12/18/15 03:03 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://www.uticaod.com/article/20151217/NEWS/151219491
Vernon, Verona lawsuit challenging settlement deal formally dismissed

An appeal of a suit that challenged the validity of the settlement among the state, Oneida and Madison counties and the Oneida Indian Nation was dismissed in state Supreme Court.

“The Appellate Division of the state Supreme Court affirmed today the dismissal of the lawsuit by the towns of Verona and Vernon against the Oneida Nation/NYS settlement,” said Joel Barkin, spokesman for the Oneida Indian Nation, in a statement. “The Appellate Division ruled that the resolution of the Oneida Nation disputes was a matter of statewide concern and that the towns cannot override or sue the state on those matters. The state had the right to make policy judgments in important matters of state concern.”

The towns were appealing a lower court judge ruling that the lawsuit had no standing.

Vernon town Supervisor Myron Thurston said he hadn’t heard about the dismissal and had no comment Thursday afternoon.

Albany attorney, Cornelius Murray, who represented Vernon and Verona in the matter, said he was still reviewing the outcome with his clients, and had no comment Thursday.

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#1479975 --- 12/18/15 06:37 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Teonan]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End

December 8th will now be remembered as the day two of the greatest poets of a generation died.

A tremendous loss. A voice for indigenous peoples everywhere. A voice for struggling people everywhere. A voice for Mother Earth.

His poetry and his music were sublime.

_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1479978 --- 12/18/15 07:37 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://auburnpub.com/news/local/cayuga-county-legislature-will-hold-special-meeting-on-cayuga-nation/article_d2d3cb64-d783-57eb-a2ad-ff321746a824.html#utm_source=%5Bdomain%5D&utm_campaign=%2Femail-updates%2Fbreaking%2F&utm_medium=email&utm_content=headline
Cayuga County Legislature will hold special Meeting on Cayuga County Land Proposal

The Cayuga County Legislature will hold a special meeting to vote on a proposed agreement between Cayuga Nation officials Clint Halftown and Tim Twoguns and county Legislature Chairman Michael Chapman.

The agreement states that the Cayuga Nation would make periodic grant payments, which would be applied to 2015 and 2016 real property taxes on nine parcels of land. These lands are not part of the land-in-trust application with the federal government, which the Nation has filed and county has opposed.

A lump sum of $75,000 would be paid to the county on Dec. 31, 2015, and three grant installments totaling $25,000 each would go towards projected 2016 taxes on the parcels.

It was not clear how much in taxes the Cayuga Nation owes for 2015.

"We don't recognize the taxing issues, but we recognize the county can use these funds to apply toward taxes," said Dan French, the attorney representing Halftown and Twoguns' group of the Cayuga Nation.

Many of the involved parties believe the idea behind the proposed agreement is positive. Legislator Keith Batman, who represents Springport, Scipio and Ledyard, areas where the Cayuga Nation owns lands, said he thought the dialogue was a good first step.

Batman had concerns with several parts of the document, however, which legislators and involved parties did not see until Tuesday afternoon before the Legislature meeting.

One concern was a clause that would null the agreement should the Village of Union Springs be successful in its litigation against the Nation concerning a bingo hall in town. According to the village's zoning laws, a gambling facility is illegal.
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So far the village has succeeded in a lower court ruling. The matter will be heard in a federal appeals court on Jan. 29.

Another issue Batman pointed out was that only Halftown's group has been a part of this agreement, not the full Cayuga Nation, which includes six leaders.

Attorney Joseph Heath, who represents the Cayuga Nation Unity Council, sent a letter to Chapman and legislators on Friday stating that Halftown and Twoguns cannot act on behalf of the Cayuga Nation on their own, making such an agreement illegal and invalid.

Chapman said he plans to bring the proposed agreement to a vote next week.

"It's a good, fresh start," Chapman said. "It relieves all the other taxpayers. It's not binding. It's a handshake deal."

[Note: Normally I would oppose making any deal, and I might anyway once I read the contract. But as long as everyone understands this is NOT in lieu of taxes and not legally binding on EITHER party, I would consider it. IF the contract wording states “in lieu of taxes”, the county will be relinquishing their right to collect these taxes.]

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#1479980 --- 12/18/15 07:52 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Teonan]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End

The Choctaw fight over self-determination & the Onondaga’s decision to remain ‘Traditional’

Onondaga Nation/ Blog, Politics
December 15, 2015

The Onondaga Nation and democratic governance have been synonymous for centuries. On the shores of our sacred Onondaga Lake, the Peacemaker united five warring peoples by giving us a system of governance based on using the Good Mind to make decisions for the coming 7th generations. The Peacemaker’s concept of each individual Nation having leaders which made decisions for their people under one common law is brilliant. At Onondaga he provided a Grand Council which was organized in three distinct benches to allow for discussion and balanced debate to guide the Haudenosaunee. So strong was the Confederacy in governance and influence that when the colonies looked to break free from the monarchy, the Haudenosaunee was the model. And in 1987, the 100th U.S. Congress passed a resolution acknowledging it.

Unfortunately after the Canandaigua Treaty in 1794, relations between the United States and Native Nations began to change. The state of affairs between the two became one of the United States trying to assimilate native peoples into this new ‘American’ culture. Part of this effort was the attempt to dissolve native governments.

Promises of aid. Recognition from the President. Reassurances of land security. Laws banning traditional ceremonies. These factors led many nations to changing from their traditional leadership methods to a general election system with tribal courts and judges. These can be seen all across Turtle Island, even in the land of the Seneca and Mohawk Nations.

When this pressure faced the Onondagas, the people had to make a decision. To continue their way of governance or to switch to a United States sanctioned government with the promises of aid but at the loss of our ability to determine our own path. The Onondagas choose sovereignty. It must have been difficult at first seeing the surrounding nations being awarded different programs while the Onondagas were did not. Often others who aren’t informed of the position of the Onondaga Nation often assume that the people get funded for this or that. Therefore there is a lot of pride in the things that we do accomplish because we decided to do it, and we did it without the aid of Federal or State help.

But I am extremely grateful for our position when I read news like the following in the New York Times: Justices Weigh Power of Indian Tribal Courts. In December 2015, the United States Supreme Court is hearing arguments that the Choctaw government and tribal court system does not have ‘authority to rule’ on a case that involved a young Choctaw teen and a business located on their lands. They may rule that the Constitution does not ‘apply’ to Native governments and their tribal courts.

The Choctaw choose the path of elected officials and tribal courts. They have followed the path that was asked of them from the United States on how to govern and settle disputes. The Choctaw did what was asked of them. They moved away from their traditional government system. They fly the United States flag in their courts. It doesn’t seem to matter.

I am grateful of our ancestor’s decision to continue down the path laid before us with by the Peacemaker.


Da•ne’thoh


http://www.onondaganation.org/news/video...in-traditional/
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1480021 --- 12/19/15 04:54 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://romesentinel.com/letters/writer-sees-hypocrisy-in-fears-over-lago-casino/QBqoln!1E2D8Y6wBoXYLJlKzbFPvQ/
Writer sees hypocrisy in fears over Lago casino

1. I can’t get over the level of hypocrisy of Ms. Roxanne Lucenti and her employer, the Oneida Enterprises, and its head hypocrite, Ray Halbritter. Ms. Lucenti could very well be right that a new casino in Seneca County could have a negative impact on the Turning Stone. That’s because the vast majority of the gamblers (customers) at both locations are or will be from the same economically stagnant region of upstate and central New York.

2. Gambling is NOT economic development if most of the gamblers come from the immediate area, as they do to Turning Stone. Something like two thirds to three quarters of Turning Stone’s gamblers come from within a 75 mile radius. That area has a stagnant to declining population and economy. Another casino is the same stagnant area will undoubtedly result in less business for Turning Stone.

3. And therein lies the hypocrisy. Turning Stone undoubtedly had the same negative effect on dozens of restaurants, bowling alleys, golf courses and other discretionary entertainment venues over all the area over of the years that it has been siphoning off dollars from our immediate area. In a relatively stagnant economic environment, with most of its customers coming from the immediate area, almost every dollar taken in at the Oneida Enterprises is one that didn’t go to some other local business.

4. The Turning Stone may have concentrated the local entertainment dollars and related jobs in one place, but make no mistake, the region didn’t have a net gain of all of those jobs – all the small businesses that closed and the jobs lost a few at a time without headlines offset most of those “new” jobs at Turning Stone. A new casino in Seneca County may very well do the same thing to the Oneida Enterprises that it did to a multitude on local businesses over the years. And now they want us to protect them from the same thing they did to many other businesses! Hypocrites!
— George Miller,

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#1480031 --- 12/20/15 08:04 AM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Teonan]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End

STAR School Earned ‘Most Innovative’ Title from Noodle Education

Indian Country
Alysa Landry
12/14/15

STAR School near Flagstaff, Arizona, is known for being off the grid, but this small charter school that earns its reputation for being self-sustaining is certainly not off the radar.

Noodle Education, a free education search engine that connects users to information and interactive learning tools, included STAR School on its inaugural list of the country’s most innovative schools. STAR, which stands for Service To All Relations, was one of 41 schools selected from a pool of more than 140,000 across the United States.

“There is no best school,” said Suzanne Podhurst, editor-in-chief at Noodle. “What there is are schools that are going to be really great for individual students. There are schools that are doing extraordinary things to change how students learn.”

STAR School, located near the southwest corner of the Navajo Nation, opened its doors in 2001. It serves about 130 students in grades pre-k through 8 and boasts a 96-percent attendance rate.



Mark Sorensen, who co-founded the school with his wife, Kate, spent his career working in Indian education. He envisioned STAR as a “school of excellence” that integrated academic success with sustainable values.

“I was determined to create a school that would demonstrate that both things can be done,” he said. “It’s much better for the students if you have a school that creates an approach that’s rooted in values of the culture and high expectations for academic success.”

From the start, STAR School proved to be innovative by necessity. Sorensen’s primary goal was to be as close as he could be to Navajo Nation but still be on land he could purchase. The result was a location far from the nearest power or water lines and a facility that is powered by 245 solar panels and two wind generators.

“Our only choice was to be solar-powered,” Sorensen said. “Since then, we have become known as the first off-grid, solar-powered elementary school in the country, and of course the first in Indian country.”

Noodle praised STAR for being off the grid. Schools on its list were not necessarily those with the highest test scores or most students going on to Ivy League schools, Podhurst said. Rather, the organization picked schools that are doing promising and innovative things to help students.

“What it’s doing is not only incorporating sustainability with its solar panels and wind generators, but it’s modeling to students what it means to think outside the box and solve problems,” she said. “It’s getting students to think in real-world terms, in sustainable and resourceful ways.”

Noodle also recognized STAR School for “expanding its environmental awareness beyond the planet Earth.” Twice a month, students go to the Coconino Community College campus to use telescopes to look at the stars. Funded through a grant from NASA, the program has allowed students to work with physicists on some of the most cutting-edge scientific discoveries, Sorensen said. That included watching the launch of Mars MAVEN as it was broadcast from Cape Canaveral in 2013.

“We are interested in how Mars exploration fits in with traditional Navajo teachings,” Sorensen said. “We believe that Native knowledge and Western knowledge can enhance and enrich one another. We want students to be exposed to the most recent scientific discoveries and to be aware of the knowledge passed down from their ancestors about the meaning of the movements of the stars.”

Sorensen attributes the school’s success to a focus on Navajo teachings, a worldview that values each individual’s experience and curriculum that engages students with the surrounding communities.

“In the Native way, relationships determine your identity,” he said. “All our of kids are expected to know their four clans, to be able to introduce themselves and how they’re related to everyone else in the school. That creates at atmosphere of warmth, like a family.”

The campus includes several greenhouses where students grow produce that is later served in the cafeteria, Sorensen said. Once a month, students use their home-grown foods to prepare and serve a meal to local elders.

“Our philosophy is to develop students that have meaningful work and meaningful family life,” he said. “It’s important that students are prepared academically, but it’s just as important that students come out with an understanding of how enriching it is to be of service to your community, your people and your school.”



Thirteen-year-old Jacayline David, an eighth-grade student at STAR, has attended the school for four years. An aspiring cardiologist, David said she likes the school’s blend of traditional and scientific teachings.

“This is a rare opportunity to learn about my own cultural background, to learn how to plant and grow crops,” she said. “But I also get to learn about science. We do things here that most schools do not.”

Read on: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.co...ducation-162660
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1480093 --- 12/21/15 08:41 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
King Ray whines & cries and threatens lawsuit. Imagine that? GASP ! There are so many tribes which appear to all be part of the “sue” tribe.

http://www.oneidaindiannation.com/pressr...-363153711.html

The New York State Gaming Commission’s announcement is the predictable outcome of a process that was predetermined to reach this result. This decision was marred by conflicts of interest, contradictory standards and total disregard for public interest. The outcome hurts Central New York, which violates Governor Cuomo’s stated purposes of the gaming law. For months, countless community and business leaders, elected officials and individual New Yorkers have spotlighted these problems to the gaming commission. Unfortunately, the decision was forced through by public officials who were blindly committed to this project and abandoned the public trust. We are left with no choice but to turn to the courts. Litigation is necessary when public officials abandon their public responsibilities.

[Note: strangely they had no problem with it when it was made part of the settlement which was marred by conflicts of interest, contradictory standards and total disregard for public interest.]

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#1480099 --- 12/22/15 01:44 AM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
kyle585 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 14652
Loc: Somewhere out there
Originally Posted By: Rich_Tallcot
King Ray whines & cries and threatens lawsuit. Imagine that? GASP ! There are so many tribes which appear to all be part of the “sue” tribe.

http://www.oneidaindiannation.com/pressr...-363153711.html

The New York State Gaming Commission’s announcement is the predictable outcome of a process that was predetermined to reach this result. This decision was marred by conflicts of interest, contradictory standards and total disregard for public interest. The outcome hurts Central New York, which violates Governor Cuomo’s stated purposes of the gaming law. For months, countless community and business leaders, elected officials and individual New Yorkers have spotlighted these problems to the gaming commission. Unfortunately, the decision was forced through by public officials who were blindly committed to this project and abandoned the public trust. We are left with no choice but to turn to the courts. Litigation is necessary when public officials abandon their public responsibilities.

[Note: strangely they had no problem with it when it was made part of the settlement which was marred by conflicts of interest, contradictory standards and total disregard for public interest.]

The blatant hypocrisy of the tribes is amazing.
_________________________
FREEDOM OF THE PRESS IS A POWERFUL FORCE KEEPING US SAFE FROM DICTATOR TRUMP

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#1480123 --- 12/22/15 01:43 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: kyle585]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End

The following commentary was signed by Andy Mager, Lindsay Speer, Paul Eiholzer, Sue Eiholzer, Kate Lewis, Jack Ramsden and Carol Baum on behalf of Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation.


It's time for the world to recognize Haudenosaunee sovereignty (Commentary)


The passport of a member of Team England was stamped at the Onondaga Nation Sept. 13, 2015. (Sarah Moses | The Post-Standard)

syracuse.com
September 17, 2015


Lacrosse has indeed come home. We are witnessing an historic first as the Onondaga Nation hosts the World Indoor Lacrosse Championship (WILC). This is the first time that an indigenous nation has hosted such an international sporting event.

Of course, this is one of many precedent-setting actions by the Onondaga Nation and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, for which Onondaga serves as the Capital or Central Fire. The Haudenosaunee established the first, and longest-running participatory democracy in the Western Hemisphere over 1,000 years ago on the shores of Onondaga Lake.

Since Europeans arrived on these shores, the Onondaga have continuously asserted their status as a sovereign nation.
The Haudenosaunee have at times been denied the right to travel on their own passports, particularly by the UK.

The first international treaty made by the United States was the 1794 Treaty of Canandaigua, recognizing Haudenosaunee lands. The first Haudenosaunee passport was issued to Cayuga Nation chief Deskaheh in 1923 to serve as an international diplomat and bring Haudenosaunee concerns to the League of Nations. In 1924, after President Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, the Haudenosaunee Grand Council sent a letter reminding him of the treaties recognizing their sovereignty, asserting their Haudenosaunee citizenship and declining U.S. citizenship. In 1977, the Haudenosaunee led a delegation of indigenous peoples to the United Nations, launching a diplomatic process that led to the United Nation's Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The Haudenosaunee passport was key to acceptance by the Federation of International Lacrosse of the Iroquois Nationals as a full member nation team independent from the United States or Canadian teams in 1987.

The Federation of International Lacrosse's decision to grant the hosting of WILC to the Onondaga Nation is further recognition of the sovereign status of the Onondaga and Haudenosaunee, but also exposes the many contradictions at play. The Haudenosaunee have at times been denied the right to travel on their own passports, particularly by the United Kingdom, a travesty which prevented the participation of the Iroquois Nationals in the 2010 World Lacrosse Championships in England and of the Haudenosaunee U19 Women's Team participation in the Women's World Lacrosse Championship in Scotland this year. In contrast, the Onondaga Nation has warmly welcomed all teams to their territory and were happy to stamp the passports of the English team.

Let us build on this important milestone and extend recognition of Onondaga and Haudenosaunee sovereignty to areas where it has been withheld, or recognized only in a token manner. We call on the government of the United Kingdom and the U.S. State Department to fully recognize the validity of Haudenosaunee passports and use their diplomatic power to encourage all nations of the world to recognize them. We call on our United States Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand and Charles Schumer and Rep. John Katko to champion this cause as representatives of we who, as U.S. citizens, wish to make amends for hundreds of years of injustice.

http://www.syracuse.com/opinion/index.ss...commentary.html
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1480151 --- 12/23/15 10:32 AM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://romesentinel.com/county/stakes-rise-in-lago-fight/QBqolv!KgLjjAgaGyiqZGVmFNsORQ/
Stakes rise in Lago fight
King Ray Beats His Tom Tom

Monday’s anticipated approval of a state license for the Lago Resort and Casino in the Finger Lakes town of Tyre is prompting opponents, including the Oneida Indian Nation, to raise their stakes in the courtroom.

A law firm representing the nation and some residents near the casino site says they will file a court challenge to what it calls the “unlawful award” by the state Gaming Commission of a casino license for Lago.

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#1480177 --- 12/23/15 07:22 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Teonan]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End

IAIA Academic Dean Charlene Teters Named One of “5 Amazing Indigenous Women to Celebrate”

by Native News Online Staff

December 20, 2015

SANTA FE — IAIA Academic Dean Charlene Teters (Spokane), a nationally-known artist, activist, and educator has a long relationship with IAIA, dating back to 1984 when she first attended as an undergraduate. Since being named to her current position at the college, she has not relinquished any of these roles.

Recently, Teters was named as one of the “5 Amazing Indigenous Women to Celebrate Instead of Christopher Columbus”-alongside such notable candidates as Anacaona (Taino), Sacagawea(Shoshone), Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee Nation), and Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabekwe Ojibwe), by Bust.com.


Dean Charlene Teeters

Teters graduated from IAIA in 1986 with an Associate of Fine Arts in painting. She then attended the College of Santa Fe (now Santa Fe University of Art and Design), graduating with a Bachelor of Fine Artsin painting in 1988. She also holds a Master of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Illinoise at Urbana-Champaign, plus anhonorary doctorate in fine art from Mitchell College in New London, Connecticut.

Teters is a founding board member of the National Coalition on Racism in Sports and the Media (NCRSM), which was created to fight the powerful influence of major media who choose to promote messages of Native American oppression.

On October 10, 1997 she was honored as Person of the Week by Peter Jennings on the ABC World News Tonight program for her commitment to her work and her people.

Her paintings and art installations have been featured in over 21 major exhibitions, commissions, and collections. Additionally, Teters was the first Artist-in-Residence at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, New York.

She was born and raised in Spokane, Washington, near the Spokane Indian Reservation.

http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/iai...n-to-celebrate/
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1480178 --- 12/23/15 07:34 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Teonan]
kyle585 Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 14652
Loc: Somewhere out there
Originally Posted By: Teonan
Recently, Teters was named as one of the “5 Amazing Indigenous Women to Celebrate-alongside such notable candidates as Anacaona (Taino), Sacagawea(Shoshone), Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee Nation), and Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabekwe Ojibwe), by Bust.com.
Congratulations to her. Is she an American citizen? Does she own property in America? If so, does she pay property taxes on it as any other American citizen would have to do?
_________________________
FREEDOM OF THE PRESS IS A POWERFUL FORCE KEEPING US SAFE FROM DICTATOR TRUMP

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#1480179 --- 12/23/15 08:20 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: kyle585]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4629
Loc: West End
Originally Posted By: kyle585
Originally Posted By: Teonan
Recently, Teters was named as one of the “5 Amazing Indigenous Women to Celebrate-alongside such notable candidates as Anacaona (Taino), Sacagawea(Shoshone), Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee Nation), and Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabekwe Ojibwe), by Bust.com.
Congratulations to her. Is she an American citizen? Does she own property in America? If so, does she pay property taxes on it as any other American citizen would have to do?

Dean Teters would probably be more than happy to address your concerns personally Kyle.

Here ya go:

Charlene Teters
Dean of Academics IAIACollege
Work Phone: (505)424-2367
Work Email: cteters@iaia.edu
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1480327 --- 12/31/15 04:57 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://romesentinel.com/letters/chamber-wrong-to-assist-oneidas-in-casino-court-fight/QBqolx!Qe8VpqMv8w1VmscZx8Fmg/
Chamber wrong to assist Oneidas in casino court fight
Published Dec 30, 2015

I was particularly dismayed with comments made by Rome Area Chamber of Commerce President William Guglielmo in your article titled “Stakes rise in Lago fight.” Regarding the Oneida Indian Nation’s (OIN) recent intention to file a court challenge to the state Gaming Commission’s awarding of a casino license for the Lago Casino, Guglielmo stated, “we stand ready to assist in any way we can to cooperate with the Oneida Indian Nation” in seeking to “get this reversed.”


I’m not a businessman, but as I understand it, the purpose of a Chamber of Commerce is to advocate on behalf of the business community to further the interests of those businesses within the community. Now it’s obvious that the OIN is indeed a business, but I would argue that it is definitely not a business within our community. It has its own government and treats our government with contempt. It collects its own taxes and evades ours. It has its own “police” force and “courts,” but uses ours to its own financial advantage. It has its own laws and flouts ours. Indeed it is the antithesis of every other business in the region. Imagine my surprise when I found out that it is a member of the Chamber of Commerce!


If Mr. Guglielmo wishes to publicly support the OIN lawsuit, I think he should recognize a few facts about the entity with which he wishes to align himself as well as the Chamber of Commerce. Everything that the OIN is alleging against Lago and the Gaming Commission, it has in actuality done repeatedly.


The OIN claims that the award of the Lago license was “marred by conflicts of interest, contradictory standards, and total disregard for public interest.” The opening of Turning Stone Casino and the recent Yellow Brick Road Casino (YBRC) easily fit into these categories. Turning Stone had an invalid gaming compact for over a decade, and YBRC has no gaming compact at all. Contradictory standards? Both casinos were opened in violation of federal Indian Law. Total disregard for public interest? Public hearings and environmental impact studies were not even attempted.


The OIN’s lawsuit isn’t about illegal activities of either the Partners Wilmorite or the state Gaming Commission; it’s about greed. It’s about an illegally privileged corporation masquerading as an Indian tribe that believes that the law, competition, and free enterprise are for everyone else but itself.


We always hear that the OIN is the largest employer in the area and that their employees buy homes, pay taxes to support schools and municipalities, buy groceries and other goods, help local clubs and organizations and create a foundation for future growth, and I tell you that’s not enough! The costs of what it contributes far outweigh the benefits.


— Scott E. Peterman,
vice president,
Upstate Citizens for Equality,

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#1480351 --- 01/02/16 08:30 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielfisher/2016/01/01/supreme-court-cases-probe-conflict/
Jan 1, 2016
Supreme Court Cases Probe Conflict Between Constitution And Native American Rights

A trio of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, plus another one waiting in the wings involving native Hawaiians, all tackle the same question: Where do the universal human rights of indigenous people end and the specific rights of American citizens begin?

It’s a tough question that has bedeviled courts and legislators since European settlers first set foot in North America, and it tends to scramble the traditional ideological positions of liberals and conservatives alike.

In U.S. v. Bryant, for example, the Obama administration finds itself arguing against the right to court-appointed defense counsel enshrined in the 1963 decision Gideon v. Wainwright – considered a triumph of liberal jurisprudence – because that would undermine the rights of Native Americans to administer tribal justice the way they see fit.

Conservatives who favor states’ rights, local control and religious freedom aren’t so ardent when it comes to Indian tribes: In the case of Dollar General, they would allow the company to remove a lawsuit against it from tribal court to the perceived safety of federal court. The third case, Nebraska v. Parker, asks whether tribes can exert their taxing authority in territories they sold more than a century ago, essentially granting them sovereignty over land that has been occupied and ruled by non-Indians since the 1800s.

Indian tribal societies predated the settlers, of course, yet in a bit of legal legerdemain the European colonists who wrote the U.S. Constitution placed the Indians under the protection of Congress and subject to most of its laws. For most of this country’s history, official government policy toward native Americans was assimilation, with an assumption the limited sovereignty Indians held within their reservations would fade away as they became farmers and their lands were absorbed into the surrounding states.

That changed in the 1960s.

“We switched from the idea of trying to take apart and dismantle Indian tribes to giving them the tools for self-determination,” said Tim Purdon, a former U.S. Attorney in North Dakota who recently formed an Indian-focused litigation group at Robins Kaplan along with Brendan Johnson, the former U.S. Attorney for South Dakota. “One of the keys to self-determination is running an effective court system.”

Now some Indian activists are saying “we have these human rights that predate your Constitution,” Purdon said. “Are we at a tipping point for the next phase of Indian policy for the human rights era?”

The conflict between self-determination and the Constitution is at the center of U.S. v. Bryant, which challenges a Ninth Circuit decision reversing the indictment of a man under a federal statute that provides stiffer penalties for repeat offenders in domestic-abuse cases. Bryant’s first conviction was in a tribal court without legal representation, and he argues that shouldn’t count toward the federal three-strikes law since it would violate his Sixth Amendment right to counsel under Gideon v. Wainwright.

Indian officials and the Obama administration disagree, even if that conflicts with the broader liberal understanding of civil rights. Under previous court decisions, Gideon doesn’t apply to tribal courts, many of which don’t provide for court-appointed defense attorneys. And the Ninth Circuit’s decision conflicts with those of two other federal circuits, meaning defendants face different rules in different parts of the country unless the Supreme Court settles the law.

The administration’s support of tribal law has a strong pragmatic angle. Domestic violence is a serious problem in Indian country – the Centers for Disease Control has reported 61% of native American and Alaskan native women have been assaulted – and Congress and the Justice Dept. have poured millions of dollars into Indian police and court systems to try make them more effective.

If the Ninth Circuit’s reasoning holds, tribal police will lose a powerful tool for curbing violent abusers. The problem for defendants like Bryant, of course, is they may be prosecuted under a different understanding of the Constitution than non-Indians, simply because they belong to a tribe and live on a reservation.

The Dollar General case also challenges the power of tribal courts to exert their jurisdiction over non-Indians, in this case a discount store chain that is accused of liability over a Dollar General manager’s alleged attack on a Choctaw tribe member’s child. The government again supports the Choctaws, saying Dollar General subjected itself to tribal justice when it agreed to operate on the reservation. But that raises the question of whether tribal courts, which can restrict juries to tribe members and sometimes allow cases to be decided by tribal elders, can violate the due process rights of non-members.

In oral arguments Chief Justice John Roberts questioned whether the Supreme Court had ever held non-members to be subject to tribal law in civil cases. Justice Anthony Kennedy asked whether it was possible companies could be held liable for millions of dollars in punitive damages in a product-liability case simply because they ship a package to a customer in Indian territory and are judged by a court there.

The third case before the court this session tackles a much narrower question: Did Congress intend to reduce the size of the Omaha Tribe reservation when it granted the tribe the right to sell 50,000 acres in 1882? The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals said no, allowing the Omahas to enforce a tax on liquor sold in stores outside the reservation’s present boundaries. The state of Nebraska and concerned municipalities elsewhere have challenged the ruling, saying it could open the door for Indian tribes to reassert control over territory they long since ceded to local and state jurisdiction.

The problem is interpreting law and attitudes that have changed since the 19th century. When Congress established Indian reservations in the 1800s, it did so assuming “that the reservation system would fade over time,” the Supreme Court said in a 1984 decision, Solem v. Bartlett. In that case the court held that only Congress could shrink the size of a reservation and it must make it clear it is doing do when it authorizes Indians to sell their land. The court endorsed a third test based on facts on the ground, a “necessary expedient,” when the vast majority of the occupants of sold land were non-Indians. But it called it ”an unorthodox and potentially unreliable method of statutory interpretation” and said in most cases courts should give tribes the benefit of the doubt in any ambiguity.

Nebraska say the Eighth Circuit discarded the third test entirely, threatening the rights of the 98% of residents in the affected area who are not of Indian descent and built homes and towns assuming they were under the jurisdiction of state government.

That’s also a concern in Akini v. Hawaii, in which Justice Kennedy issued a stay on Nov. 27. In that case, plaintiff Keli’i Akina and other Hawaiians are suing to block a proposed election by the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, an organization established by state law that identifies native Hawaiians as descendants of the people who inhabited the islands before Captain James Cook landed there in 1778. The Roll Commission is charged with establishing a list of “qualified Native Hawaiians” who can participate in a convention to “facilitate their self-governance” and address other issues including “ownership, possession, or use of lands by the Native Hawaiian people.”

Both the Justice and Interior Departments supported the movement, which also claims the support of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. But the plaintiffs say the state-sponsored convention would violate their constitutional rights, because voting is limited to descendants of pre-1778 residents of the Islands who have “maintained a significant cultural, social, or civic connection to the Native Hawaiian community” and support the creation of a native Hawaiian “governing entity.”

Not only do those requirements violate the 15th Amendment’s ban on race-based voting discrimination, the plaintiffs say, but they represent unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination. Akini is a citizen of native Hawaiian descent, for example, but he refused to agree to Declaration One, which requires signers to affirm “the unrelinquished sovereignty of the Native Hawaiian people, and my intent to participate in the process of self-governance.”

The Supreme Court already ruled against the race-based qualifications for trustees for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs in the 2000 decision Rice v. Cayetano, so it’s unlikely it will rule differently should this case appear before the current court. But Justice John Paul Stevens might have expressed the liberal opinion prevalent in the Obama administration when he dissented, saying Congress and the state of Hawaii had the power to create an organization strictly to look after the interests of native Hawaiians.

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#1480352 --- 01/02/16 08:37 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
The Spreading Epidemic of Tribalism

By Elaine Willman, Author
Going To Pieces..

“Officials in a small Montana town say they will have to disincorporate the community or declare bankruptcy over an ongoing dispute with the Blackfeet Tribe about water and utility service…lawsuits filed by the Blackfeet Tribe, Two Medicine Water Company and certain tribal members have had the same goal: to eliminate the Town of Browning by bleeding it financially dry, officials reported.”
Missoulian, Dec. 25, 2015

A similar fate once threatened the Village of Hobart, Wisconsin, and now threatens Shawnee, Oklahoma and many other communities . So what is the problem with removing municipal government for tribal government jurisdiction? Tribal governments do not allow non-tribal residents any voice in their government, and have no duty to protect or serve them. Tribes just want to tax, govern or chase non-Indians away. Rightful government of American citizens on Indian reservations is gone when states, counties and towns spinelessly give up.

More serious is enormous escalation of tribal governance over non-tribal persons, businesses and properties resulting in the removal of State authority and responsibility for its citizens. Citizens are losing their government when they succumb to bullying, name-calling, frivolous litigation, appeasement, and acquiescence to every tribal demand. The price is the loss of government that serves and protects you – the United States and State Constitutions.

Every Indian reservation is co-located within states, multiple counties and numerous towns. Among the 566 federally recognized tribes, some 340 Indian reservations are located directly within or near urban areas as well. Only two or three Indian reservations are predominantly populated with Indians. The vast majority of reservations are home to a large non-Indian population. Congress intended and fully opened Indian reservations to encourage settling of the West, and citizenship for Indians. That is the reality federal, state, local and tribal governments now find unacceptable.

Early Indian treaties executed by either the Department of War or Secretary of Interior served two people and two purposes: to provide land and protection for Indian tribes and to keep the settlers safe. Every Indian Treaty has a clause requiring open public roads through reservations, and a clause requiring Indians to “cause no depredation” (harm) to settlers. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) originally looked to the well-being of all folks in the West, not just Indians until 1934. The Indian Reorganization Act was a paradigm shift for the BIA that from 1934 on, focused only on Indians, hired only Indians and facilitated expansion of tribal governance to the exclusion of state authority and citizen protections on reservations.

The Obama Administration poured accelerant into the expansion of tribalism with two recent, alarming policies: 1) President Obama decided that the nation’s public utilities, power and energy grid are good “economic development” for conversion to Indian tribal assets. Obama and Congress have funded billions of dollars out to tribes for transitioning major dams, energy corporations, and confiscation and control of water across the country. 2) Obama and Congress have determined that tribal government interactions with Middle Eastern countries is now a great idea for Indian “economic development” too (the Hearth Act of 2012).

Domestic tribalism and Middle Eastern tribalism have shared cultural norms (communalism) and a common adversary: the United States. The White House views big Middle Eastern money (Turkey, Saudi Arabia, etc.) tucked away on private Indian tribal “trust” lands as good for Indians and America. Tribal trust land is off-limits to all state and local government eyes. Am I kidding? No, we should be very concerned. For the doubtful, visit the www.aljazeera.com website to see how significantly America’s Indian tribes are being tracked and engaged. Just enter the search word “tribe.”

We will now have wealthy little Sharia compounds on Indian reservations to add to the 190 cities designated to receive Syrian refugees. Obama is polka-dotting the entire country with Sharia enclaves to enrich Indian tribes and reflect our generous heart for immigrants. Our blind, deaf and dormant Congress has held its nose and endorsed all of this.

Promises made by Congress to “Go West Young Man” were just as valid and perpetual as any promise made to Indian tribes. It was Young Man who built the first schools, churches, small towns, farms and ranches, all on the faith that Congress provided in Homestead and other Acts. Young Man built this country. For the past several decades, however, promises made to settlers and their descendants have been politically stained and reversed. America should not have sent Young Man West. Indian tribes want their reservations and “aboriginal lands” restored to their natural habitat. Every non-Indian should be shamefully sorry forever, and gone soon. The lack of appreciation for Young Man and coddling of tribal governments is chilling.

This is what pockets of apartheid now bolstered with more of the same from Middle Eastern countries are doing to America. This is what unequal, hyphenated-Americans and “cultural diversity” has created. “Americans” is a wrong and ugly word in its own country. I practice daily free thought, free speech and due process, and am keenly aware of my rights under the federal and state constitutions. I absolutely refuse to tolerate that my own citizenship in this country is denounced as inferior to that of any other American citizen.

We have a growing national epidemic but the impacts first strike locally, in one zip code after another, one town after another, one county after another. It is coming to your front porch.

State, county and local governments within Indian reservations absolutely must stand tall no matter the severity of well-funded special tribal governments funded by you, to defeat you. States must act as fully separate Constitutional Sovereigns on equal footing with each other, and independent of the Federal government beyond its enumerated rights. Every single American, including tribal members living within or near and Indian reservation in 2016 must commit to “If you see something, say something.” We are either strong and equal citizens protecting ourselves and country, or the perfect storm is set to take us down sooner than we even know.

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#1480549 --- 01/08/16 06:22 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://www.capecodtimes.com/article/20160105/NEWS/160109728
Judge issues permanent ban on Gay Head tribe's bingo hall
Says Gay Head tribe breached 1987 settlement in pursuing gaming site

By George Brennan

Jan 5, 2016

A federal judge Tuesday agreed to strengthen his dismissal of the suit between the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) and the state, imposing a permanent injunction against the tribe’s proposed bingo hall on the island.

U.S. District Court Judge Dennis Saylor IV signed the motion filed by Attorney General Maura Healey and attorneys for the town of Aquinnah and the Aquinnah/Gay Head Community Association Inc.

Saylor had already dismissed the suit, but without the strong stipulations that are in the motion. In November, Saylor ruled in favor of the state, town and community association saying that the Aquinnah tribe had not shown sufficient evidence that it had the right to exercise governmental power over settlement lands.

The tribe is expected to file an appeal in the First District Court of Appeals.

At issue is a 1987 settlement act between the tribe, the town and state granting more than 400 acres of Martha’s Vineyard land to the tribe as a reservation.

Saylor agreed that settlement act is “valid and enforceable, and that the tribe breached the settlement agreement in the course of pursuing the establishment of a gaming facility at or on the Wampanoag Community Center building site.”

Tribe attorneys argued unsuccessfully that the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 supersedes the agreement.

The federal case stemmed from a 2013 state suit filed by then-Gov. Deval Patrick seeking to block the tribe by alleging breach of contract. The tribe successfully had the case moved to federal court.

The tribe’s attorney, Scott Crowell, could not be reached for comment

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#1480644 --- 01/12/16 12:16 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2016/1/11/ny-village-mulls-changing-seal.html#commentsDiv
NY village to keep seal some call racist

In a non-binding vote Monday night, residents voted 157-55 to not change their current seal.

"Whitesboro views this seal as a moment in time when good relations were fostered," Nimey-Olney said. "It is a wrestling match, part of the history, and nothing more."

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#1480675 --- 01/13/16 01:20 PM Re: Still More Tribal News [Re: Rich_Tallcot]
Rich_Tallcot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/19/03
Posts: 5481
Loc: Greeneville, TN
CITIZENS EQUAL RIGHTS ALLIANCE AND CENTRAL NEW YORK FAIR BUSINESS IS ONCE AGAIN HOLDING A PUBLIC FORUM ON FEDERAL INDIAN POLICY AND HOW IT AFFECTS ONEIDA AND MADISON COUNTY.

We have filed our notice to appeal to the second circuit and are excited about the evidence that has been found and will be included in the appeal.

SUNDAY JANUARY 24TH LANA MARCUSSEN-SAUCERMAN WILL BE AT THE V V S HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, RT. 31 VERONA, N.Y. FOR A PRESENTATION AND QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION.

WE WILL BEGIN AT 5 PM AND HAVE TWO HOURS

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