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#1469288 --- 04/17/15 07:20 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Will this facility grow natural marijuana or Monsanto's patented gmo marijuana?

Citiva Medical eyes Seneca County site for proposed medical marijuana growing facility

http://auburnpub.com/blogs/eye_on_ny/cit...a1915f5fc5.html


Monsanto Creates First Genetically Modified Strain of Marijuana

Apr 15, 2015

Although Monsanto’s testing on cannabis is only at an experimental stage, no plan has yet been released by the agriculture business firm as to what purposes the patented strain would be used for, although specialists believe answers should come this fall as rumors of a controversial new bill which could “loosen up laws around medical m*arijuana” is reportedly scheduled to pass before congress coming this fall.

Critics fear genetically modified cannabis will mix with other strains and could destroy the diversity of DNA, a reality dismissed by most studies claim experts.

http://www.conspiracyclub.co/2015/04/15/monsanto-creates-first-genetically-modified-strain-of-marij/
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#1469306 --- 04/17/15 09:10 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Gagged by Big Ag

Horrific abuse. Rampant contamination. And the crime is…exposing it?

By Ted Genoways July/August 2013 Issue

Ag gag laws allow industry "to completely self-regulate," says a whistleblowers' advocate. That should "scare the pants off" consumers who want to know how their food is made.

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/06/ag-gag-laws-mowmar-farms
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#1469317 --- 04/17/15 11:37 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Is there Atrazine (herbicide) in your drinking water?

April 6, 2014

“Atrazine is the number one contaminant found in drinking water in the U.S. and probably globally probably in the world”, says University of California Berkeley, scientist Tyrone Hayes.

http://globalnews.ca/news/1248219/is-there-atrazine-in-your-drinking-water/


If Atrazine does this to frogs, what is it doing to humans?

Dr. Tyrone Hayes Speaks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1Nom0UX83w
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#1469350 --- 04/19/15 01:43 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
U.S. regulators may recommend testing food for glyphosate residues

By Carey Gillam April 17, 2015

Glyphosate is used on corn, soybeans, sugar beets and other crops genetically altered to withstand it. It is also used by farmers growing wheat and other crops. Its use has surged with the advancement of genetically engineered crops.

The U.S. government, which annually tests thousands of foods for pesticide residues, does not test for glyphosate, in part because it has been considered safe.

That could change, the EPA said in a statement Friday.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/17/us-food-agriculture-glyphosate-idUSKBN0N82K020150417
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#1469353 --- 04/19/15 05:17 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
ACTION ALERT (OCA, Organic Bytes #466,

Ready for GMO Labels, Hillary?

It’s official. Hillary Clinton is running for president.

She’s also an official supporter of Monsanto and GMO crops—unless we convince her to listen to the more than 90 percent of Americans (and voters) who have made it clear we want labels on foods containing GMOs.

We already know from her speech (watch Hillary promote Monsanto approximately 29 minutes in) to the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) convention in San Diego in June 2014, that Hillary supports genetic engineering. But she's so far managed to dodge the question of whether or not she supports state GMO labeling laws or the DARK (Deny Americans the Right to Know) Act, a bill recently reintroduced in Congress, that would preempt state GMO labeling laws. Or whether she supports the Boxer-DeFazio bill for mandatory labeling of GMOs.

Love her or hate her, you know that Hillary stands a good chance of being the next president of the United States.

You also know that the World Health Organization recently declared glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup, a probable human carcinogen. And that the majority of GMO crops are sprayed liberally with Roundup.

It’s time to think big. It’s time to make this a campaign issue. It’s time to demand that Hillary tell us where she stands on GMO labeling.

It’s time to tell her where you stand.

If you haven't signed the petition, please sign today. If you've already signed, please ask five of your friends to sign today.

TAKE ACTION: Tell Hillary Clinton: Support GMO Labeling and Public Health, Not Monsanto!

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/hillary-clinton-its-time?source=c.url&r_by=5382364
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#1469354 --- 04/19/15 05:30 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Organic Bytes #477

CAMPAIGN UPDATE Bee Proud!

Last week (April 9, 2015), Lowe’s announced it would begin phasing out neonics and working with growers to source alternatives. In Lowe’s own words:

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Food Rebel, Carbon Farmer
A third-generation farmer and food producer, Wick says he always believed he and his family were farming responsibly. Until they realized they weren’t.

NEW STUDY

‘Enormous Threat’

The report says that excessive nitrogen emissions are still alarmingly high in Germany, and that agriculture is the country’s largest source (60 percent) of nitrogen emissions.

https://www.organicconsumers.org/bytes/organic-bytes-466-ready-gmo-labels-hillary
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#1469378 --- 04/19/15 10:12 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Dr. Mercola & Dr. Druker on GMO History (Part 1 - Full Interview)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rBL0MK9Y-o


Dr. Mercola & Dr. Druker on GMO History (Part 2 - Full Inteview)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FRqq42-x0k
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#1469419 --- 04/20/15 03:22 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
cwjga Offline
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Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12650
Loc: NY
http://grist.org/food/think-big-corn-far...aign=socialflow

Think commodity corn farmers are evil? Meet a few of them

By Liz Core on 15 Apr 2015 33 comments
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If you’ve ever crossed Iowa on I-80 en route to someplace you fancy more exotic, you might recall mile after solitary mile of soybeans and corn and the occasional side-leaning barn. Agriculture, you may have noticed, is Iowa’s most palpable characteristic — but, I’ll wager a guess, you didn’t see more than one or two farmers anywhere in sight.

Even as a small-town Iowa kid, the only farmers I knew personally were my great-grandparents — who, in their heyday, were known state-wide for their prize-winning watermelons. Iowa has undergone a lot of changes since Grandpa Clyde was grooming his gourds, though. In 1950, the state had 206,000 farmers; in 2012, that number was down to 88,637. Iowa land once cultivated a diverse range of crops, but is now seeded almost exclusively with commodity crops like corn, soybeans, and oats that are processed into ethanol or animal feed. Tell me where you can find a watermelon farmer in Iowa now, let alone a famous one, and I’ll buy you one of those blue-ribbon tenderloins.

Farm Size Matters

These charts show why corn is king


Our crazy farm subsidies, explained


2 farmers’ stories: The fall and rise of the mid-size farm

Farm Size Matters is supported by
Lundberg
A few months ago, I traveled home to visit family. Flying from Seattle to Des Moines, I watched the landscape shift from snow-capped mountains to carefully gridded squares. From above, Iowa appears to have been meticulously engineered into one, big corn- and soy-producing machine. Though I was there for mom and dad, I was also on a quest to find my home state’s hidden farmers. After 23 years as an Iowa kid, I’d finally meet the farmers behind those fields, the inconspicuous backdrop to my childhood.

Really, I did more than just meet them. I chatted about agricultural policy over cinnamon-spice tea; toured a thousand-acre farm in a fourwheeler seated next to a labrador; and played peek-a-boo with shy, barefoot farming boys.

Iowa commodity growers are often demonized for what and how they grow, and monocultures and ethanol aren’t exactly healthy for the planet. But all of the farming families I talked to expressed a deep respect for the land and the desire to take good care of it for the next generation. If we want to understand how and why our agriculture system is the way it is, we’d be wise to approach all farmers with an open mind.

So, meet a few of Iowa’s farmers. Here are our edited and condensed conversations:

Brock Hansen

fullsizerender-cropLiz Core
Farm stats: 2,300 acres of corn and soybeans in Baxter, Iowa

What’s the history of your farm?

On my mom’s side, our land goes back five generations. We strictly grow corn and soybeans, along with a small amount of alfalfa. My mom and dad have their own operation, and my wife and I have our own operation — but we work together. Until about 10 years ago, we had beef cows, and sold the calves off in the fall. Dad sold seed corn on the side. Since then, we got out of hogs and cattle. We had a hired man who stepped in and took over. When we sold the hogs, we bought a few semis and hauled grain and bean meal out of Des Moines to a chicken farm.

How do you sell your product?

First, I look up who has the best prices and contracts. Almost 99 percent of our corn goes to ethanol plants, and the byproduct is turned around and fed to livestock. One hundred percent of our beans go to Des Moines for oil and meal production. Have you heard of Unilever? We’re participating in a program so we can trace where the beans come from and what’s being done to them. I think a lot of them go into Hellman’s mayonnaise.

How has your farm changed?

In granddad’s era, the new thing was chemicals — that was probably in the ’50s or ’60s. Then it went to commercial fertilizer and no-till farming in dad’s era. Now, in my era, the newest part is GPS equipment, pin-point location, and all the technology that’s been brought to the farm. Farming is more of world market than it’s ever been. The market used to never move — if there was a $0.10 swing, it’d take years. Now, that’s an everyday thing.

What do you see as the future of your farm?

Who’d a thought 20 years ago we’d have tractors that would drive themselves? Everything gets bigger, it seems like. Is it the best for it? Probably not. People used to live off of 160 or 180 acres — I wish it could go back there. The world might be better, in general, if farming went back to the mom-and-pop shops.

Do I want to get bigger? Well, everyone wants a bigger piece of the pie. I’d like to be the most efficient on the acres I have. But I don’t need 20,000 acres when I can be just as productive on 5,000.

In what ways are the goals of the food movement consistent with the goals on this farm?

I don’t see the consumer, to tell you the truth. It’s a closed circuit for me. I take our grain straight to the ethanol plant. But you know, consumers are asking them for non-GMO bean meal to feed non-GMO pigs at the company we haul our beans to. There’s a growing demand for that. But you as a consumer, and me as a producer, our paths don’t usually cross.

When the consumer asks us what we’re doing, I tell them we’re trying to be better. I don’t think our story is told enough, but we’re trying. I blame some of that on the media — no offense. It’s easy to cover the bad things, not the good things. For instance, we’ve been no-till for 25 or 30 years, which helps with erosion and creates better top soil; we’ve introduced cover crops; we use GPS equipment to help minimize over-use of chemicals; we’ve upgraded grain driers; we applied for an energy grant to make the drier more efficient, to use less natural gas; we’re looking at putting up a wind turbine. We’re trying to be environmental, green — whatever you call it.

Mark and Julie Kenney

Kenney family cropped (1)Julie Kenney
Farm stats: 3,000 acres of corn, soybeans, and oats in Nevada, Iowa

What’s the history of your farm?

Mark: We’re fifth-generation farmers. My great-great-grandfather started farming in central Iowa back in the 1880s. The original parcel of land that he purchased, we still own. Generations have added to it, but I’m proud that original piece is still a part of our family farm.

Julie and I make our livelihood on this farm. Where I go to work is where I grew up as a child. I feel really fortunate. As a duty, as a responsibility, we try to be active in promoting agriculture to those who aren’t involved in it. We invite people to our farm to show day-to-day operations. When it becomes more of a conversation, commodity farming becomes more readily understood. It takes time, but it’s just as much as the job as making sure the crops are planted.

How has your farm changed?

Mark: My dad says he remembers the first commercial seed he planted. It was planted by a two-row, horse-drawn planter. The last crop he planted was with a tractor driven by GPS.

One thing that is the same today as it was generations ago is that we’re producing a commodity, so our competition isn’t only local, it’s global. Technology isn’t something to be shunned or afraid of — it’s to be embraced. We need to find ways to use new technologies to make our farm competitive in world markets. I’ve always been taught that technology can give you an edge.

Julie: The thing I’ve seen change the most is how public perception is influencing what we do. In Iowa, more and more young people are removed from the farm. So now, we have a duty to help open doors to explain to others who aren’t as familiar with what’s going on. I try not to think of it as us educating, because I want it to be a two-way conversation; I want to listen to what the general public’s concerns are.

What do you see as the future of your farm?

Mark: The way my grandpa farmed is different from the way we farm now, but there are certain things that endure time. While the equipment has changed, the core values are the same: attention to detail, being fiscally responsible, understanding that there’s more to the world than just yourself, being a member of the community, and making yourself available to help neighbors in need. That’s what I hope will continue on this farm.

Agriculture will keep getting more competitive and capital intensive. I estimate farms will become larger because technology is allowing that, and we’ll continue to produce more from a smaller resource base.

Julie: I think there will be more non-traditional people who get involved in farming. I think we’ll see more companies like Google that want to be involved in agriculture. I think we’ll continue to get questions from people about where their food comes from, and we’ll have to become more transparent about that.

In what ways are the goals of the food movement consistent with the goals on this farm?

Mark: Above any other law, my No. 1 boss is Mother Nature. The weather is in control — and such a major factor in our yearly income. It impacts if we can work some days. It’s been true since the dawn of time, but it’s still one of the biggest misconceptions in modern agriculture.

I think I can speak for most farmers and say that we enjoy our independence. A trait that successful farmers share is operating our farms the way that we please. For instance, a mile from our house is a small organic farm with vegetables and honey bees. They have a very small acreage, and it’s a lot of labor — but they’re doing it. Another farmer next to us grows organic corn and soybeans. We’re all farmers, it’s all agriculture, we just all do it a little different.

How does agricultural policy affect you?

Mark: Our farm has operated under the auspices of farm bills since the 1930s. I don’t see how that is going to change how we work on the farm. Government doesn’t outweigh market forces — and it certainly doesn’t outweigh the weather. I do think there’s a role for the government to play in food production. Of all the things we must secure, food is No. 1. We wouldn’t want to outsource our food production like we’ve done with energy production — what a terrible thing that would be.

Ward and Sandi Van Dyke

wardsandi-cropWard Van Dyke
Farm stats: 2,000 acres corn and soybeans in Pella, Iowa

What’s the history of your farm?

Ward: We’re third- and second-generation farmers, but we’ve had this farm since 1986. There would be days in high school when I would skip school to help with the crops. Back then, that’s just what we did.

Sandi: We started in cattle and hogs and eventually we went strictly to grain. When we moved here, we added a garden as a project for our kids.

How has your farm changed?

Ward: When I was little, my parents had two- or four-row planters. Now, we can plant 30 rows at a time, and that’s just average — it’s actually kind of small. Our combine harvests with a 35-foot head, rather than 16 like it used to be. We went from having no technology to having full auto-guidance, automatic sprayer shut-off, yield monitors, variable rate planning, and variable rate nitrogen application.

That technology makes us much more efficient. For example, when we’re out in the field planting seeds, we want to know what’s been planted. The machine will shut off so we don’t plant more seeds than we need. Same with the sprayer: It’ll shut off so we don’t put out too much herbicides or insecticides.

What do you see as the future of your farm, and farming in Iowa?

Ward: In general, farms are going to continue to get larger. If labor is an issue, you can eliminate people, and tractors do it.

Sandi: I don’t know, sometimes I wonder. There’s been an influx of smaller, niche farms. I don’t know if the general public will catch on and embrace it, though, because we’re used to cheap food. Everybody wants cheap food.

Ward: You wouldn’t have the critical mass for that. It’s hard, it’s tough.

Sandi: It would be fun to go back, though. Wouldn’t it be nice to go back to how it was when we grew up our parents’ farms? There was livestock, chickens, and grain — it was more self-sufficient. It’d be nice.

How does agricultural policy affect you?

Ward: I’ve been to two meetings already to talk about the farm bill — and it’ll take a meeting or two more before I understand it. The policy is complicated. In general, I think less government is better. There are a lot of hurdles to jump over, paperwork, and time and energy and money, versus just doing what we need to do. Why make it so complicated?

In what ways are the goals of the food movement consistent with your goals on this farm?

Ward: We don’t want our grain hauled any farther than it has to — similar to the farm-to-table movement. The fewer miles the grain has to drive is better, because it’s expending less fossil fuels.

And there’s also a lot of consumer education that needs to happen around here. You know, in our kids’ garden we have these great spaghetti squash, but if consumers don’t even know what a spaghetti squash is, then what? You have to educate consumers, so they want to buy the product.

Sandi: We used to have a CSA, but lots of people quit because they weren’t using all the produce. People are in so many activities and always on the go, so they aren’t able to prepare their own food. It’s interesting; there are so many people who think they want to do eat local until they have to implement it. And they can’t, because it doesn’t fit with their lifestyle.

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#1469441 --- 04/20/15 07:00 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12650
Loc: NY
http://findourcommonground.com/food-facts/local-organically-grown-food/

Local and Organically Grown Food



How do you define local food? Maryland farmer Jennifer Schmidt wants consumers to know that even some canned foods could be considered local for many people. Listen to her story in the video.

Local/Organic FactsInfographic #1Infographic #2
Is buying from local farms better for the environment?
Not necessarily. The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University reports that the number of transportation miles and energy used to produce so-called “locally grown” food turns out to be great indicators of what is local, but not of environmental impact. Sometimes it takes more energy to grow and harvest local food than it does to grow it far away and have it shipped. Sustainability has many complicated facets beyond the carbon footprint, including soil tillage, crop protection and fertilizer use, waste handling, shipping and water use.
Buying from local farms helps support area farmers but does not ensure that farmers grow enough food to help feed a rapidly increasing global population. Only 20 percent of U.S. farmland is located near metropolitan areas. As our population grows and competes for land, energy and water, U.S. farmers will need to be even more efficient and productive. Small, local farms will have a niche but cannot alone sustainably or practically address all future food production needs.
Should I always try to buy organic foods?
Organic does not necessarily mean a healthier product. In fact, a comprehensive review of some 400 scientific papers on the health impacts of organically grown foods, published in the journal Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, concluded organic and conventional food remain equally healthy.
All foods – whether organic or nonorganic – must meet certain health and safety regulations before being sold to consumers. Several U.S. government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), monitor the food production chain through regulations and inspections from farm to fork to ensure that all food is safe.
Understanding what classifies food as organic is complex. The production processes involved in growing or raising food qualify it as organic, not the final product itself. Organic classification should not be an automatic green light indicating the quality or safety of a product.
Is organic food more nutritious?
The USDA, which certifies organic production, makes no claims that organically grown food is more nutritious than conventionally grown food. Organic food proves to be only different in how it is grown, handled and processed.
In the case of milk, stringent government standards include testing all types of milk for antibiotic and other residues to ensure that both organic milk and conventional milk remain equally pure, safe and nutritious. Organic or traditional, all milk contains the same valuable nutrients.
Why is organic food often more expensive?
Organic production can increase management costs and risks for some farmers and ranchers. Organic crop production actually represents only a very small portion of total U.S. food production. U.S. farmers and ranchers plant about 3 million acres of organic crops and have about 2 million acres of rangeland and pasture in organic systems. Those figures represent less than 1 percent of total U.S. land being farmed today.

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#1469500 --- 04/21/15 08:57 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Regulations to implement GMO food labeling adopted

Posted: Apr 20, 2015

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) - The Attorney General's Office in Vermont has formally adopted the regulations implementing a state law requiring the labeling of food produced with genetic engineering.

Vermont became the first state to require the labeling in 2014.

http://www.wcax.com/story/28848117/regulations-to-implement-gmo-food-labeling-adopted
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#1469503 --- 04/21/15 09:16 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Institute of Science and Society

Ending GMOs Now - 4/21/15

...GMOs failing old and new, while organic and non-GMO markets continue booming; the days of GMOs are numbered, let’s hasten the demise Dr Mae-Wan Ho

...fraudulent science of the GMO agritech sector. GM foods were first commercialised in 1992 but only because the Food and Drug Administration covered up the extensive warnings of its own scientists about the dangers, lied about the facts and violated federal food safety law by permitting these foods to be marketed without having been proven safe through standard testing.

A thorough analysis of recent research conducted in the US and around the world shows that genetic modification has not significantly improved the yields of crops such as corn and soy. Instead GM crops have increased the use of toxic herbicides and led to herbicide resistant super weeds.

http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Ending_GMOs_Now.php
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#1469528 --- 04/22/15 02:58 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
I'm looking forward to the day when New Yorkers can add their names to a class action law suit against this company.

Monsanto sued in Los Angeles County for false advertising

April 21, 2015

Today a class action lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles County, California against the Monsanto corporation. The suit alleges that Monsanto is guilty of false advertising by claiming that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, targets an enzyme only found in plants and not in humans or animals. Monsanto makes this claim to support the contention that glyphosate is harmless to humans.

Today's lawsuit may be the beginning of an avalanche. Earlier this month, Beijing resident Yang Xiao-lu filed a lawsuit against the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture...

Residents of California can become members of the class in this action...

http://www.examiner.com/article/monsanto-sued-los-angeles-county-for-false-advertising
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#1469530 --- 04/22/15 03:17 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Moms Across America 4/21/15

Sources say these lobbyists are paid 20K a month and there are 20 of them trolling the hill for the chemical companies every day. Apparently 20K a month is not enough to drink a glass of Roundup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovKw6YjqSfM
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#1469535 --- 04/22/15 06:43 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Is Your Vinegar Made From GMOs?

A new lawsuit against Heinz reveals an unpleasant reality about your favorite green cleaner.

April 1, 2014

This is just the latest in a string of lawsuits challenging "natural" claims on foods that contain, or likely contain, GMO ingredients. At least 100 lawsuits have been filed since 2011 against major food brands, including Kellogg Co., Campbell Soup and Nature Valley. Even Trader Joe's and Ben & Jerry's ice cream have been targeted.

http://www.rodalenews.com/what-vinegar-made
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#1469536 --- 04/22/15 06:52 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
The Really Awesome Thing That Lowe's Is Doing

The retail giant takes a big step toward safer lawn products.

April 9, 2015

In an act that suggests that pressure from consumers, advocacy groups, and investors really works, home-improvement giant Lowe's is vowing to get bee-killing chemicals off of its store shelves.

http://www.rodalenews.com/lowes-goes-green
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#1469538 --- 04/22/15 07:18 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
If your bank is lending money to Monsanto, take your money out and let them know why you are leaving.

Moms Across America - 4/22/15

Why is Monsanto borrowing BILLIONS of dollars from the world's largest banks? Is your bank on here? Then whose money are they really borrowing? Might be time for a withdrawal.

"On March 27, 2015, Monsanto Company (“the Company”) entered into a $3 billion, five-year revolving credit agreement (the “Five-Year Credit Agreement”) with certain lender parties thereto, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as administrative agent, Citibank, N.A., Bank of America, N.A. and Morgan Stanley Senior Funding, Inc., as co-syndication agents, Barclays Bank plc, Goldman Sachs Bank USA, The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd. and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as co-documentation agents, and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated and Morgan Stanley Senior Funding, Inc., as co-lead arrangers and joint bookrunners. This agreement replaces the Company’s $2.5 billion four-year revolving credit agreement, dated as of April 1, 2011, as amended (the “Prior Agreement”)."

Five-Year Credit Agreement dated March 27, 2015

http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1110783/000119312515117966/d901698d8k.htm?hc_location=ufi
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#1469571 --- 04/22/15 11:34 PM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Jeffrey Smith

The GMO potato and apple use dsRNA, which could literally change the way our genes are expressed if we eat these. I discuss this on the Daily Show this evening. Here's a more serious look at this urgent health risk.

Why Scientists are Worried about the GMO Potato and Apple

April 22, 2015

For more than a decade, he has been warning the agencies that approve GMOs about the need to test new dsRNAs for safety.

While it’s true that most RNA are not stable, Heinemann points out that “surprisingly, the form of RNA called dsRNA is very very stable. . . . And it’s now been shown that they can be taken up after digestion of the food into our blood supply.” More importantly, in a groundbreaking study conducted in China in 2012,[4] dsRNA fed to mice “transferred to the liver and down-regulated an important liver enzyme.”

http://www.responsibletechnology.org/pos...tato-and-apple/
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#1469573 --- 04/23/15 12:03 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
The existential crisis facing GMOs - they don't work and we don't want them

Colin Todhunter

21st April 2015

The GMO industry has legitimised itself via a vast network of lobbyists and the assiduous capture of the politicians, regulators and scientists that should be holding it to account, writes Colin Todhunter. But as the failure of the GM revolution and its disastrous impacts become ever more evident, the industry's legitimacy is fast eroding away.

http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_an..._want_them.html
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#1469577 --- 04/23/15 12:42 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Toxic chemical of the year

https://vimeo.com/115304371
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#1469578 --- 04/23/15 12:45 AM Re: State of the Science of the Health Risks of GMO Food [Re: MissingArty]
MissingArty Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 12/18/11
Posts: 2355
Loc: Waterloo, NY
Studying Health Outcomes in Farmworker Populations Exposed to Pesticides

Feb 16 2006

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1480483/#__abstractid451092title
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