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#1443543 --- 04/06/14 04:00 PM Re: When Standards Aren't Standardized [Re: VM Smith]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11903
Loc: NYS
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
They do indicate what you have or haven't learned in school...


These tests don't.
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#1446546 --- 05/05/14 01:31 PM Re: When Standards Aren't Standardized [Re: twocats]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4306
Loc: West End
Originally Posted By: twocats

Across the nation, parents and educators are raising objections to the Common Core standards.


Yup. Another public school teacher walking the talk.


The New Conscientious Test Objectors at International High School in NYC!

By Jesse Hagopian
I AM AN EDUCATOR

May 1, 2014

A couple of days ago a New York area code popped up on my cell phone. I didn’t recognize the number—but when a teacher on the other end of line said that she was organizing a testing boycott at her high school, I certainly recognized the situation.

Emily Giles, a teacher at International High School at Prospect Heights, told me about a standardized test that was disrespecting the schools’ English Language Learner (ELL) students’ cultural and linguistic diversity. She told me about ELL students who were brought to tears during the fall pre-test administration of the exam because of the level of English used was far above the level of beginner ELLs—and thus provided very little useful feedback for the teachers. Emily told me about a test that some 50% of the parents were already set to opt out of. And she told me of the dedicated educators who were no longer willing to see their students humiliated or their profession degraded by the abuses of the NYC ELA Performance Assessment Test.

Similar conditions arose in Seattle last year when my colleagues at Garfield High School refused to administer the MAP test—and succeed in making the test optional for high schools. When I spoke to Emily, it was clear that she and her coworkers had already set in motion all the key components to a successful direct action campaign against the tests. We discussed how there are no guarantees about the outcome when you engage in civil disobedience, but that because her colleagues had built such a strong base of support among teachers and parents, if the staff truly felt that they could not administer this test in good conscience, I thought it was worth taking this stand for her students.

I checked in with her last night as she was preparing for the press conference today to see how she was holding up. I remember the fear vividly—the cold sweats and sleepless nights—I had when we prepared to announce that Garfield would refuse to administer the MAP test, and I figured she could use some support. What she told me let me know that these teachers are ready to take a bite out of the Big Apple. She said,

I’m feeling a little nervous, very excited, and completely inspired by the people I work with. I’m feeling really happy and honored to work with people who are so passionate about what they do, and care so deeply what happens in our classrooms and the lives of the young people we work with.

From Seattle, to Chicago, to New York City, teachers are defending their students and reclaiming their humanity by refusing to be reduced to a test score.

Today is May Day—international workers’ day. There is no better way to celebrate the struggles of workers today than by supporting these courageous educators at the first high school in New York City to boycott a standardized test by signing on to the petition in their defense.

Today is also my late Grandfather’s birthday. Happy Birthday Grandpa Chuck! Chuck was a conscientious objector during WWII. I said to him once near the end of his life, “Weren’t you afraid of how your peers and society would look at you for not going to fight in the war? That must have been a hard decision.” He paused before he spoke and I have never seen my gentle, soft-spoken grandfather look so fierce. To be honest, his look gave me a scare. Then he replied, “No it wasn’t hard at all. What would have been hard would have been to kill someone.”

That same gentle fierceness of spirit burns within the conscientious test objectors at International High School at Prospect Heights.

Don’t give up. And when you reach the end of your life, you will look back in certainty at having made the only choice you could have: Following your convictions in pursuit of justice.


I AM AN EDUCATOR BLOG
http://iamaneducator.com/2014/05/01/the-...-school-in-nyc/


Jesse Hagopian teaches history and is the Black Student Union adviser at Garfield High School, the site of the historic boycott of the MAP test in 2013. Jesse is an associate editor of the acclaimed Rethinking Schools magazine, is a founding member of Social Equality Educators (SEE), was recipient of the 2012 Abe Keller Foundation award for “excellence and innovation in peace education,” and won the 2013 “Secondary School Teacher of Year” award and the Special Achievement “Courageous Leadership” award from the Academy of Education Arts and Sciences.

Jesse is an author, activist, and a regularly requested public speaker at community forums, panel discussions, rallies, debates, public hearings, and on college campuses.Jesse is a contributing author to 101 Changemakers: Rebels and Radicals Who Changed US History and Education and Capitalism: Struggles for Learning and Liberation (Haymarket Books).
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"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1447271 --- 05/12/14 06:51 AM Re: When Standards Aren't Standardized [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 9524
Loc: NY
Obama screwed up everyone's health insurance, no surprise that he screwed up (even more) education.



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Almost, Peggy, But This Time Not Quite
Chester E. Finn, Jr.
May 09, 2014
For no current-affairs commentator do I have greater respect than Peggy Noonan, whose sagacity, common sense, plain-spokenness, and “big picture” view of things are as welcome—and rare—as the clarity and persuasiveness of her prose.

When it comes to the Common Core State Standards, however, she’s only about 60 percent right.

She’s right that the architects and promoters of these standards had—and have—the best of intentions, both with respect to millions of kids who now receive a mediocre-to-dismal education and to the long-term vitality and competitiveness of the nation itself.

She’s right that the “proponents’ overall objective—to get schools teaching more necessary and important things, and to encourage intellectual coherence in what is taught—is not bad, but good.”

She’s right that, as with every ambitious effort to reform every large, complex system in the history of the world, those proponents—I’m one of them—underestimated the implementation challenges.

She’s right that they—we—haven’t always been as thoughtful and respectful as we should regarding the concerns and convictions of parents and others on the ground. (She uses the word “patronizing” and that’s also right, at least in part.)

But she’s not right to offer absolutely no alternative—unless, of course, she’s content with American K–12 education the way it is, which I know she isn’t.

And she’s not right to fail to note that the Common Core would have been—at least at this point in time—a sort of ambitious pilot program involving a smallish number of states that were serious about the implementation challenges, until the feds blundered into the middle of it with “incentives” that turned it into a sort of national piñata. (It does, however, remain absolutely voluntary for states, and I will shed no tears when those that don’t really want to put it into conscientious operation in their schools stop pretending that they will.)

And she’s not right to overlook how much of the pushback that she cites comes not from “harried parents,” but from formidable interest groups that really don’t want to change how they’ve always done things, whether or not such change would be good for kids or the country. I have in mind textbook publishers, test-makers, teacher unions, and political opportunists of every sort, lately and most prominently of the “tea party” persuasion, who will do and say anything to take down Obama and everything he’s for.

Like Peggy, I once worked for President Reagan and, like Peggy, I don’t have much use for today’s incumbent in that honored role. But that’s not supposed to get in the way of changing our clunky education system so that tens of millions of kids learn more. Maybe even more than they and their parents realize they need to learn.
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Annoying liberals, it's just too easy. Hard to believe how easy it is.

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#1451276 --- 06/20/14 08:11 AM Re: When Standards Aren't Standardized [Re: Teonan]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 31962
Loc: USA
the 'teachers' union used its power so that 'teachers' do not have to perform at their 'job'

the 'teachers' only have themselves to blame for common core
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"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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