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#1405231 --- 06/15/13 07:19 AM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: bluezone]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4865
Loc: Malmö
Originally Posted By: bluezone

she has an excuse for her entire job

yet she still gets paid


Obviously others have had THEIR fill of your bashing and trashing the contributions of an experienced member of the teaching community in these forums...

Originally Posted By: VM Smith

You speak for yourself, as is your right, but, while she and I disagree on some things, I like her, and I respect her. I think she's as intelligent as anyone need be, and probably more than most, and she's reasonable, respectful, and pleasant, even when we disagree.


Originally Posted By: Code Red
Bluezone, you can't always judge a person by the actions of a whole group. Some teachers are better than others. Some lack the compassion to do their job, but yet go to work in the schools every day. The fact that TC is willing to defend the schools and teachers, shows a compassion for their job... So if you want to paint most of the teachers as being in it for the money, and they imagined glory, use a smaller brush. Not all of them are that way, and especially TwoCats.


Take THAT Bz.



_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1406999 --- 06/27/13 10:53 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: Teonan]
mimi33 Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/30/02
Posts: 526
Loc: seneca falls, ny, usa
Most of the teachers I know, went into teaching for the belief that they would be doing a great service to the world...lighting a spark! Firing a mind! And they just got bogged down by the bureaucracy....maddening. All of you that bash teachers....try it for just one day. And then tell all of us how easy it is. And VM seriously, I understand your take on education, but take a look around at the population, do you really want these people to teach their own children??

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#1407000 --- 06/27/13 10:55 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: VM Smith]
mimi33 Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/30/02
Posts: 526
Loc: seneca falls, ny, usa
Can you please outline to us how education should happen, in a practical way that would fit the current societal and social norms?

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#1413660 --- 08/21/13 02:18 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: mimi33]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Inappropriate 1st Grade Common Core Standards. What a joke.


This Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology for A New Nation: American Independence contains background information and resources that the teacher will need to implement Domain 10, including an alignment chart for the domain to the Common Core State Standards; an introduction to the domain including necessary background information for teachers, a list of domain components, a core vocabulary list for the domain, and planning aids and resources; 12 lessons including objectives, read-alouds, discussion questions, and extension activities; a Pausing Point; a domain review; a domain assessment; culminating activities; and teacher resources. By the end of this domain, students will be able to:

Identify the early English settlements on Roanoke Island and at Jamestown as colonies that were established before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock;
Explain that the first Africans in the English colonies came to Jamestown as indentured servants, not slaves;
Locate the thirteen original colonies;
Describe how the thirteen colonies in America evolved from dependence on Great Britain to independence as a nation;
Describe the Boston Tea Party;
Explain the significance of Paul Revere’s ride;
Identify “one if by land, and two, if by sea”;
Identify Minutemen, Redcoats, and the “shot heard round the world”;
Describe the contributions of George Washington as Patriot and military commander;
Describe the contributions of Thomas Jefferson as Patriot, inventor, writer, author of the Declaration of Independence, and the third president of the United States;
Describe the contributions of Benjamin Franklin as Patriot, inventor, and writer;
Explain the significance of the Declaration of Independence;
Identify “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…” as a part of the Declaration of Independence;
Explain the significance of the Fourth of July;
Retell the legend of Betsy Ross and the flag;
Identify Martha Washington as the wife of George Washington;
Describe the contributions of George Washington as first president of the United States;
Identify Washington, D.C., as the nation’s capital;
Explain that the nation's capital, Washington, D.C., was named after George Washington;
Describe the roles of African Americans, Native Americans, and women during the evolution from thirteen colonies in America to independence as a nation;
Identify the U.S. flag, the Liberty Bell, and the bald eagle;
Explain the significance of the flag, the Liberty Bell, and the bald eagle as U.S. symbols;
Ask and answer questions (e.g., who, what, where, when), orally or in writing, requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts of a nonfiction/information read-aloud;
Answer questions that require making interpretations, judgments, or giving opinions about what is heard in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud, including answering why questions that require recognizing cause/effect relationships
Identify the main topic and retell key details of a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask and answer questions about unknown words and phrases in nonfiction/informational read-alouds and discussions;
Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Use illustrations and details in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud to describe its key ideas;
Identify the reasons or facts an author gives to support points in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Compare and contrast (orally or in writing) similarities and differences within a single nonfiction/informational read-aloud or between two or more nonfiction/informational read-alouds;
Listen to and demonstrate understanding of nonfiction/informational read-alouds of appropriate complexity for grades 1–3;
Plan and/or draft and edit an informative/explanatory text that presents information from a nonfiction/informational read-aloud that includes mention of a topic, some facts about the topic, and some sense of closure;
With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed;
Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., group scientific research and writing);
Make personal connections (orally or in writing) to events or experiences in a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud, and/or make connections among several read-alouds;
With assistance, categorize and organize facts and information within a given domain to answer questions;
Use agreed-upon rules for group discussion (e.g., look at and listen to the speaker, raise hand to speak, take turns, say “excuse me” or “please,” etc.);
Carry on and participate in a conversation over at least six turns, staying on topic, initiating comments or responding to a partner’s comments, with either an adult or another child of the same age;
Ask questions to clarify information about the topic in a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask questions to clarify directions, exercises, classroom routines, and/or what a speaker says about a topic;
Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly;
Add drawings or other visual displays to oral or written descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings;
Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation;
Provide examples of common synonyms and antonyms;
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are cozy);
Learn the meaning of common sayings and phrases;
Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationship (e.g., because);
With assistance, create and interpret timelines and lifelines related to read-alouds;
Prior to listening to an informational read-aloud, orally identify what they know about a given topic;
While listening to an informational read-aloud, orally predict what will happen next in the read-aloud based on the text heard thus far, and then compare the actual outcome to the prediction;
Share writing with others;
Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately; and
Use regular present-, past-, and/or future-tense verbs correctly in oral language.
http://www.engageny.org/resource/grade-1-ela-domain-10-a-new-nation-american-independence


Edited by twocats (08/21/13 02:18 PM)
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1413661 --- 08/21/13 02:29 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
What is the joke? This is a serious question. Is it too hard?

I am not a fan of Common Core, mostly because it rewards wrong answers, I would like to hear your take.
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

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#1413671 --- 08/21/13 02:51 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
In 12 lessons, students will be able to accomplish all of these objectives? 6 year old students? Really?

I also have a problem with rewarding wrong answers. I believe teachers should see if students are using the right process and use that as a springboard for instruction. I've seen that students don't get full credit if they don't use their fingers or counters to add numbers (kindergarten). If they don't need fingers or counters, why should they be encouraged to use them?
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1413684 --- 08/21/13 03:33 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats
In 12 lessons, students will be able to accomplish all of these objectives?

Are all students expected to accomplish all those objectives. The arguments that I have heard against common core are in regards to it lowering the standards that students are expected to meet. your post seems to state the opposite.

6 year old students?

I know some very smart 6 year olds, would they all be able to accomplish it, most likely not. What about the ones that could.

Really?

?

I also have a problem with rewarding wrong answers. I believe teachers should see if students are using the right process and use that as a springboard for instruction. I've seen that students don't get full credit if they don't use their fingers or counters to add numbers (kindergarten). If they don't need fingers or counters, why should they be encouraged to use them?

They should not be.
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

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#1413685 --- 08/21/13 03:54 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats
In 12 lessons, students will be able to accomplish all of these objectives?

Are all students expected to accomplish all those objectives. The arguments that I have heard against common core are in regards to it lowering the standards that students are expected to meet. your post seems to state the opposite.

6 year old students?

I know some very smart 6 year olds, would they all be able to accomplish it, most likely not. What about the ones that could.

Really?

?

I also have a problem with rewarding wrong answers. I believe teachers should see if students are using the right process and use that as a springboard for instruction. I've seen that students don't get full credit if they don't use their fingers or counters to add numbers (kindergarten). If they don't need fingers or counters, why should they be encouraged to use them?

They should not be.
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

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#1413686 --- 08/21/13 03:57 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
And then there's this factoid about the latest testing:


From Superintendent Snyder:
"On a third grade math test, a child who answered 37 out of 39 questions correctly (that is 95% correct) was deemed performing at level 3. A child who answered 85% of the answers correctly was deemed performing at level 2. Some children, who were performing at level 1, actually had scaled scores that would have put them at level 3 last year."
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1413746 --- 08/21/13 09:13 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Originally Posted By: twocats
In 12 lessons, students will be able to accomplish all of these objectives?

Are all students expected to accomplish all those objectives. The arguments that I have heard against common core are in regards to it lowering the standards that students are expected to meet. your post seems to state the opposite.

6 year old students?

I know some very smart 6 year olds, would they all be able to accomplish it, most likely not. What about the ones that could.

Really?

?

I also have a problem with rewarding wrong answers. I believe teachers should see if students are using the right process and use that as a springboard for instruction. I've seen that students don't get full credit if they don't use their fingers or counters to add numbers (kindergarten). If they don't need fingers or counters, why should they be encouraged to use them?

They should not be.


When trying to meet objectives, a standard rule is you move on when 80% of the class has mastered 80% of the material. I just don't see 80% of any first grade class mastering 80% of this material in 12 lessons.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1413757 --- 08/21/13 11:38 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
More First Grade learning Objectives from the Common Core:

1.Locate the area known as Mesopotamia on a world map or globe and identify it as part of Asia;
2.Explain the importance of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers and the use of canals to support farming and the development of the city of Babylon;
3.Describe the city of Babylon and the Hanging Gardens;
4.Identify cuneiform as the system of writing used in Mesopotamia;
5.Explain why a written language is important to the development of a civilization;
6.Explain the significance of the Code of Hammurabi;
7.Explain why rules and laws are important to the development of a civilization;
8.Explain the ways in which a leader is important to the development of a civilization;
9.Explain the significance of gods/goddesses, ziggurats, temples, and priests in Mesopotamia;
10.Describe key components of a civilization;
11.Identify Mesopotamia as the “Cradle of Civilization”;
12.Describe how a civilization evolves and changes over time;
13.Locate Egypt on a world map or globe and identify it as a part of Africa;
14.Explain the importance of the Nile River and how its floods were important for farming;
15.Identify hieroglyphics as the system of writing used in ancient Egypt;
16.Explain the significance of gods/goddesses in ancient Egypt;
17.Identify pyramids and explain their significance in ancient Egypt;
18.Describe how the pyramids were built;
19.Explain that much of Egypt is in the Sahara Desert;
20.Identify the Sphinx and explain its significance in ancient Egypt;
21.Identify Hatshepsut as a pharaoh of ancient Egypt and explain her significance as pharaoh;
22.Identify Tutankhamun as a pharaoh of ancient Egypt and explain his significance;
23.Explain that much of what we know about ancient Egypt is because of the work of archaeologists;
24.Identify Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as major monotheistic world religions;
25.Locate Jerusalem, Israel, and the area known as the Middle East on a map;
26.Define monotheism as the belief in one God;
27.Identify the Western Wall (or the Wailing Wall) as associated with Judaism, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre with Christianity, and the Dome of the Rock with Islam;
28.Identify the Hebrews as the ancient people who were descendants of Abraham;
29.Explain that followers of Judaism are called Jewish people and the term Jewish is used to describe practices or objects associated with Judaism;
30.Identify the Star of David as a six-pointed star and a symbol of Judaism;
31.Identify the Torah as an important part of the Hebrew scriptures;
32.Identify that a Jewish house of worship is called a synagogue or temple;
33.Identify Moses as a teacher who long ago led the Jewish people out of Egypt in an event referred to as the Exodus;
34.Explain that, according to an important story in the Torah, Moses received the Ten Commandments from God and that the Ten Commandments are rules that tell people how to behave or live their lives;
35.Identify important Jewish holidays such as Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Hanukkah;
36.Explain that Christianity developed after Judaism;
37.Explain that followers of Christianity are called Christians;
38.Recognize the cross as a symbol of Christianity;
39.Identify the Bible as the Christian holy book;
40.Identify that a Christian house of worship is called a church;
41.Identify that Christians believe Jesus to be the Messiah and the son of God;
42.Identify important Christian holidays, such as Easter and Christmas;
43.Recognize that both Christians and Jewish people follow the Ten Commandments;
44.Explain that Islam originated in Arabia;
45.Explain that followers of Islam are called Muslims;
46.Identify the crescent and star as symbols of Islam;
47.Identify the Qur’an as the holy book of Islam, containing laws for daily living and many stories that appear in Jewish and Christian holy books;
48.Identify that a Muslim place of worship is called a mosque;
49.Identify that Muslims believe that Moses and Jesus were prophets but believe that Muhammad was the last and greatest of the prophets;
50.Identify important Muslim holidays, such as Ramadan and Eid-ul-fitr;
51.Use narrative language to describe (orally or in writing) characters, setting, things, events, actions, a scene, or facts from a fiction read-aloud;
52.Identify who is telling the story at various points in a fiction read-aloud;
53.Ask and answer questions (e.g., who, what, where, when), orally or in writing, requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts of a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
54.Answer questions that require making interpretations, judgments, or giving opinions about what is heard in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud, including answering why questions that require recognizing cause/effect relationships;
55.Identify the main topic and retell key details of a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
56.Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
57.Ask and answer questions about unknown words and phrases in nonfiction/informational read-alouds and discussions;
58.Use illustrations and details in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud to describe its key ideas;
59.Compare and contrast (orally or in writing) similarities and differences within a single nonfiction/informational read-aloud or between two or more nonfiction/informational read-alouds;
60.Listen to and demonstrate understanding of nonfiction/informational read-alouds of appropriate complexity for grades 1–3;
61.With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed;
62.Make personal connections (orally or in writing) to events or experiences in a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud, and/or make connections among several read-alouds;
63.With assistance, categorize and organize facts and information within a given domain to answer questions;
64.Use agreed-upon rules for group discussion (e.g., look at and listen to the speaker, raise hand to speak, take turns, say “excuse me” or “please,” etc.);
65.Carry on and participate in a conversation over at least six turns, staying on topic, initiating comments or responding to a partner’s comments, with either an adult or another child of the same age;
66.Ask questions to clarify information about the topic in a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
67.Ask and answer questions (e.g., who, what, where, when), orally or in writing, requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts of a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
68.Ask questions to clarify directions, exercises, classroom routines, and/or what a speaker says about a topic;
69.Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly;
70.Add drawing or other visual displays to oral or written descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings;
71.Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation;
72.Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are cozy);
73.Learn the meaning of common sayings and phrases;
74.Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because)
75.Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately;
76.Prior to listening to an informational read-aloud, identify what they know about a given topic;
77.Share writing with others;
78.With assistance, create and interpret timelines and lifelines related to an informational read-aloud;
79.Demonstrate understanding of literary language such as setting;
80.While listening to an informational read-aloud, orally predict what will happen next in the read-aloud based on the text heard thus far, and then compare the actual outcome to the prediction; and
81.Use personal pronouns orally.
http://www.engageny.org/resource/grade-1-ela-domain-4-early-world-civilizations


Edited by twocats (08/21/13 11:38 PM)
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1414030 --- 08/23/13 10:35 AM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

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#1414404 --- 08/27/13 06:43 AM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: cwjga]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
Had a chat with a teacher last night, she said that Common Core is not the problem (funny to watch liberals fight against liberals though) She really did not have a problem with Common Core, the problem she said is that all kids are expected to meet the same standards.

When the powers that be in there marble towers realize that all children are not equal, and she can get back to teaching kids things that they can learn things will improve.
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

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#1414408 --- 08/27/13 07:35 AM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
The way you try to make everything partisan is pretty lame.

Common Core is the driving force to make all children meet the same standards. It is NCLB on steroids.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1414419 --- 08/27/13 09:13 AM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats
The way you try to make everything partisan is pretty lame.

Common Core is the driving force to make all children meet the same standards. It is NCLB on steroids.


Those were her words not mine.

She had no problem with the standards, only with the fact that all kids need to meet them.
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

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#1415619 --- 09/03/13 10:38 AM Re: Common Core [Re: cwjga]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 32557
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Had a chat with a teacher last night, she said that Common Core is not the problem


is school 'open' yet?
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1415848 --- 09/04/13 08:09 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS

FINLAND PRESIDENT IS TIRED OF AMERICAN TOURING FINNISH SCHOOLS

Year after year, Finland tops international lists for education. And its success flies in the face of what reformers call for in this country: no standardized tests, less time spent in the classroom, all students mainstreamed in the same class, little homework.

So it's little wonder that groups of Americans travel to Finland to observe and see what practices we can bring to our embattled schools.

Well, that's the theory, at least. Apparently the truth is more indicative of the failings of American education than perhaps these 'deformers' would prefer to acknowledge. No matter how many groups go to Finland, no matter how many times they tour the facilities, no matter how many white papers, recommendations, reports and prospectuses are written, one fact is evident to the Finns: WE AREN'T LEARNING. And Finnish President Sauli Niinisto is done speaking to the proverbial brick wall:

"We are a kind and generous people and we are certainly flattered by your interest in our educational system. However, we have answered all your questions and shared all of our wisdom. It is up to the United States to actually do something with the knowledge it has gained. I believe Americans might say it is time to, 'Put up or shut up.' After all how many times can we tell you that we trust and respect teachers and don't administer standardized tests until students are almost ready for college?"

He's actually called for a moratorium on giving Americans tours of the Finnish education system. A MORATORIUM, for crying out loud. It's gotta be painful to all those closely held notions of American exceptionalism that Finns think we're too stupid to actually absorb this information. But the hits keep coming:

"We expected education reformers would do something in response to all they had learned from us but for some reason Americans just don't seem to be learning. Perhaps they have something other than improving public education as their goal."

Gosh, Arne Duncan, I do believe that one left a mark.

Is our children learning? Hell, it's clear the people in charge CAN'T learn.

PS. This is from a satirical site. Sounds all too believable to me.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1416310 --- 09/08/13 01:15 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 11720
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats

FINLAND PRESIDENT IS TIRED OF AMERICAN TOURING FINNISH SCHOOLS

Year after year, Finland tops international lists for education. And its success flies in the face of what reformers call for in this country: no standardized tests, less time spent in the classroom, all students mainstreamed in the same class, little homework.

So it's little wonder that groups of Americans travel to Finland to observe and see what practices we can bring to our embattled schools.

Well, that's the theory, at least. Apparently the truth is more indicative of the failings of American education than perhaps these 'deformers' would prefer to acknowledge. No matter how many groups go to Finland, no matter how many times they tour the facilities, no matter how many white papers, recommendations, reports and prospectuses are written, one fact is evident to the Finns: WE AREN'T LEARNING. And Finnish President Sauli Niinisto is done speaking to the proverbial brick wall:

"We are a kind and generous people and we are certainly flattered by your interest in our educational system. However, we have answered all your questions and shared all of our wisdom. It is up to the United States to actually do something with the knowledge it has gained. I believe Americans might say it is time to, 'Put up or shut up.' After all how many times can we tell you that we trust and respect teachers and don't administer standardized tests until students are almost ready for college?"

He's actually called for a moratorium on giving Americans tours of the Finnish education system. A MORATORIUM, for crying out loud. It's gotta be painful to all those closely held notions of American exceptionalism that Finns think we're too stupid to actually absorb this information. But the hits keep coming:

"We expected education reformers would do something in response to all they had learned from us but for some reason Americans just don't seem to be learning. Perhaps they have something other than improving public education as their goal."

Gosh, Arne Duncan, I do believe that one left a mark.

Is our children learning? Hell, it's clear the people in charge CAN'T learn.

PS. This is from a satirical site. Sounds all too believable to me.


Hey I am all for it. Don't start till kids are seven and finish in 10th grade. Kids can then go on to two years in community college or go on to vocational schools.

I like that their school year is longer too.
_________________________
Liberal heads are exploding, so easy. Betty and Tommy sure got triggered.

Top
#1416315 --- 09/08/13 02:01 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Originally Posted By: twocats

FINLAND PRESIDENT IS TIRED OF AMERICAN TOURING FINNISH SCHOOLS

Year after year, Finland tops international lists for education. And its success flies in the face of what reformers call for in this country: no standardized tests, less time spent in the classroom, all students mainstreamed in the same class, little homework.

So it's little wonder that groups of Americans travel to Finland to observe and see what practices we can bring to our embattled schools.

Well, that's the theory, at least. Apparently the truth is more indicative of the failings of American education than perhaps these 'deformers' would prefer to acknowledge. No matter how many groups go to Finland, no matter how many times they tour the facilities, no matter how many white papers, recommendations, reports and prospectuses are written, one fact is evident to the Finns: WE AREN'T LEARNING. And Finnish President Sauli Niinisto is done speaking to the proverbial brick wall:

"We are a kind and generous people and we are certainly flattered by your interest in our educational system. However, we have answered all your questions and shared all of our wisdom. It is up to the United States to actually do something with the knowledge it has gained. I believe Americans might say it is time to, 'Put up or shut up.' After all how many times can we tell you that we trust and respect teachers and don't administer standardized tests until students are almost ready for college?"

He's actually called for a moratorium on giving Americans tours of the Finnish education system. A MORATORIUM, for crying out loud. It's gotta be painful to all those closely held notions of American exceptionalism that Finns think we're too stupid to actually absorb this information. But the hits keep coming:

"We expected education reformers would do something in response to all they had learned from us but for some reason Americans just don't seem to be learning. Perhaps they have something other than improving public education as their goal."

Gosh, Arne Duncan, I do believe that one left a mark.

Is our children learning? Hell, it's clear the people in charge CAN'T learn.

PS. This is from a satirical site. Sounds all too believable to me.


Hey I am all for it. Don't start till kids are seven and finish in 10th grade. Kids can then go on to two years in community college or go on to vocational schools.

I like that their school year is longer too.


Me too as long as we provide the other necessary supports that make that successful such as universal pre-school and paid child care, paid time off for parents to raise their children, universal health care and other social welfare programs.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1416867 --- 09/11/13 06:16 PM Re: Common Core Kool-Aid [Re: twocats]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
A brilliant letter from a brilliant child in DC's public schools.


Diane Ravitch's blog
A site to discuss better education for all

A Datapoint Writes a Letter to Arne Duncan
By dianerav
September 11, 2013 //
17
Almost a year ago, I posted a letter from a sixth-grade
student in the DC public schools who wrote about herself as a data
point. She identified herself as Noa Rosinplotz. The letter was so
articulate that many readers were certain that it was not written
by a child. In time, I received letters from well-known
journalists, including her mother, attesting to the fact that Noa
exists and that she really was only 12. Now Noa is in seventh
grade, and she shared this letter.

You might want to visit her
Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Datapoints-Inc/309583325823040

Noa speaks for a generation of data points:

Dear Mr. Duncan,

I’m writing you because I got my DC CAS results in the mail.

See, I thought you might want to know what they were. I certainly don’t. I
mean, the first thing I noticed in that packet was the paper. It’s
fancy and green-a pretty light green, which sort of fades out when
it gets to the end of the paper.

I thought you might want to know,
Mr. Duncan. Your system paid for my thick pastel green paper, and
for all the ink that goes into telling me that I got a 91% on
Reading Literary Text. Oh-I forgot to introduce myself. No need-I
got Advanced, which is what you’re wondering.

I bet you’re also wondering how I feel about that. Am I happy, relieved, perhaps
surprised? But I forgot-you don’t have to know, Mr. Duncan, because
all that matters is I got Advanced.

But I’ll tell you anyway. You can’t know every child in this country and their reactions to the
pretty green paper. But at least you can know me, just one
datapoint, one spot on the chart. When I saw that green paper, I
didn’t hold it up to the light or smile or show it to my parents. I
tossed it back on the table and went to eat an August nectarine.

Let me tell you what’s on my sheet, Mr. Duncan. It says my name,
student ID, teacher, birthday (ours are barely a month apart, Mr.
Duncan), and the city I live in, Washington, DC. You live here too.
I wonder if you’ve ever seen me on the street, riding my bike or
walking with friends. Your eyes probably went right over me and you
forgot me milliseconds after remembering.

You might know me, though, in the back of your brain, as Advanced. Let’s get back to
the sheet, though. Want to hear what I can do? I can read sixth
grade informational and literary texts and analyze author’s purpose
and supporting evidence. I can use and analyze diverse
organizational structures to locate information, interpret and
paraphrase information, interpret subtle language, analyze
relevance of setting to the events and mood of a narrative, and use
stated words, actions, and descriptions of characters to determine
their feelings and relationships to other characters.

But that’s not all! I can use tables to compare ratios! I can solve problems
involving finding the whole when given a part and the percent! I
can multiply slash divide multi digit decimals! I can use order of
operations to evaluate expressions with multiple variables and
whole-number exponents, solve an inequality that represents a
real-world math problem, analyze relationships of ordered pairs in
graphs slash tables!

Aren’t you proud of me, Mr. Duncan? I can see
you, in my head, reading this and thinking: “That girl sounds like
a real charmer. I mean, how many girls who can describe overall
pattern with reference to the context in which data were gathered
are there out there?”

But I don’t care, Mr. Duncan, I don’t care. I
can fill in bubbles and I can write my name nice and neat up in the
line on my answer sheet where it tells me to do so. I can use scrap
paper efficiently and check whether a pencil is #2 with a single
glance. I know the testing procedures, I know my testing seat, and
I know how to leave adequate time for BCRs.

Aren’t you proud of me, Mr. Duncan?

Because this is what I have learned. This is what No
Child Left Behind has taught me. I have learned to be a puppet and
take their tests and get a fancy green paper every year in the
mail, except for when it’s just a gray photocopy. I am twelve years
old and I know as well as anybody that standardized tests do
nothing but cause pain and stress for everybody involved. And oh,
have I learned. I’ve learned more than I ever thought possible.

School has taught me things, and tests have taught me other things.
I can speak Spanish fluently and find palindromic numbers and write
letters to education officials and formulate a hypothesis and
everything in between. But on test days, none of that matters.

All that matters is the busy work in front of me, the math problems and
confusing passages that swim beneath my vacant gaze and leave me
thinking of anything, everything but what lies ahead in the next
two hours. And after all this is done, after we drink water and use
the bathroom and return to our daily lives, what happens?

Fancy green papers are released and people’s fates are decided. But we,
the students, we, the people, are never consulted. We care and we
take the tests and we don’t like it. Do you want facts, Mr. Duncan?
I’ve got plenty. Oh, and by the way, I looked for a student survey
to show you here. There were none. ·

For my science experiment last
year, I gave our 5th grade citywide benchmark, the Paced Interim
Assessment, or PIA, to a group of English professors at various
universities across the country. Their average was a meager 89%,
much lower than one would expect from some of the experts on the
English language in the US. Nobody got a perfect score. · According
to a survey of Indiana teachers, 85.7% of teachers disagree or
strongly disagree that standardized testing is an accurate measure
of student achievement. ·

A mere 22% of Americans “believe
increased testing has helped the performance of local public
schools”, according to a poll released by PDK/Gallup · After the
implementation of NCLB, students faired no better on the PISA,
dropping from 18th place to 31st place in mathematics
internationally. · A New Mexico high school teacher, citing his
students’ impatience with standardized tests, revealed that the
kids had started drawing designs on their bubble sheets instead of
taking the actual tests: “Christmas tree designs were popular. So
were battleships and hearts.” ·

I was going to put a test question
here, but that’s making it too easy for you. Look at one yourself.
· And you know the rest, Mr. Duncan. Ask Google. Google will tell
you more. I’m not asking for you to stop these tests, Mr. Duncan. I
know it isn’t your fault. I just want you to hear a student’s
opinion. You have kids-they can tell you. Nobody listens to the
datapoints, so we must make ourselves heard.

Your job is to support us, Mr. Duncan. Please, do so, the best you can.

Listen, and look out for me on the streets of the nation’s capital. I’ll do the
same. Maybe on the basketball court, maybe in a café or a diner.
You might be downtown, taking your kids to the movies or boating on
the Potomac. You might be on the same bus as me, or waiting at the
same stoplight. We’re both people, Mr. Duncan, and you know that.

So listen and read this. Maybe it’ll make you think, change your
mind on all this. And if you do end up reading this, I’m the
Advanced kid with a purple bracelet on her right wrist and long
curly hair. Smile at me if you see me, but I won’t smile back. Not
until the fancy green paper stops arriving at my doorstep in
August. Sincerely, Advanced with a purple bracelet on her right
wrist.

Now Rosinplotz

Follow her at Datapoints, Inc. on Facebook.



Edited by twocats (09/11/13 06:17 PM)
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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