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#1399259 --- 04/27/13 07:30 AM Dear Parents
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Dear NYS Parents,
APRIL 27, 2013 BY CHRIS CERRONE LEAVE A COMMENT
Here is another terrific guest post from Bianca Tanis, Hudson Valley Parent and Educator.
An Open Letter to NYS Parents,

I’m sure that you have heard about some of the drama that is going down in public education and I’m sure that you have been overwhelmed by the mixed messages from teachers, reform groups, anti-reform groups, and the state. It’s a lot to process, and if you are like me, your brain is probably starting to turn off right about now. But I am going to ask you to stick with me for a few more minutes because there are some things that you need to know about the reality of your child’s education.

This month, students in grades 3-8 took the new NYS Math and ELA Exams. The state promised more rigor, and I suppose that they delivered on that promise. Over the past two weeks, your son or daughter was forced to sit for 9 hours of testing. And if he if or she required extra time, you can make that 13 to 18 hours. I would say that’s pretty rigorous. By the way, here is how the Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines rigor: harsh inflexibility in opinion; the quality of being unyielding or inflexible; an act or instance of strictness; severity; or cruelty.

I would like you to ponder how sitting for a 90 minute to 3 hour testing session at the age of 10 affects your ability to maintain focus and answer questions to the best of your ability. As an adult who has voluntarily sat for the SAT, the GRE, and multiple licensing exams, I can attest to the fatigue and “brain drain” that sets in after about an hour. Also consider the fact that children are not allowed to eat or drink while taking the test, for fear that they may soil the testing protocol, and that for many children, testing cuts into lunchtime and specials.

The NYS teacher’s union, NYSUT, recently ran a campaign called “Tell It Like It Is.” Teachers were invited to share how the new mandates are impacting their students. In one of the testimonials, a teacher talked about how her third grade student was so anxious that he vomited on the 3rd grade ELA exam. After the child was sent to the nurse, the principal called the state for guidance on how to proceed. She was told to retrieve the vomit-soaked test from the garbage, place it in a Ziploc bag and send it back to the state. Are you getting the impression that the state cares that much about the security and well-being of our kids?

You have probably heard and read various comments to the effect that tests are a part of life. A doctor must take a rigorous exam in order to practice medicine; a new driver must take a written exam to ensure that they know the rules of the road; high school students must take the SAT in order to gain entry to college. If you are trying to convince parents that an 8-year-old should sit for 9 hours of testing, you are going to have to do better than that. Yes, tests are a part of life–adult life. Can any adult really believe that forcing children to submit to tests that rival the SAT and GRE in length at the age of 8, 9, and 10 will help them later in life? 50 years ago, society used to think that bullying and hazing helped build resilience and toughness, but for the sake of our children, I would like to think that we have all grown past this “baptism by fire” mentality. And yes, I did just equate NYS testing to bullying.

If you are not already aware, the NYS Commissioner of Education, John King, has stated that he knows that kids are going to do poorly on the tests this year. In response to a question asked at a meeting this past March, about what he would say to a student who is nervous about the tests, King said:

“At the end of the day…Learning is about having challenges…sometimes one does well…sometimes one doesn’t do as well as one hopes…and one learns from that and goes on…The role of educators…is to instill in students…the ability to self regulate around those kinds of anxiety. We start at the earliest stages. That is the work that adults have to do with young people to help give them perspective. That is our job.”

Parents, you need to know that this how our Commissioner of Education views the role of teachers: To set kids up for failure so as to teach them perspective, in the third grade. As a parent, I want to be there to pick my child up when he falls. I’m not going to trip him or knock him down, just so that I can teach him perspective and how to deal with challenges. And although the commissioner is OK with this being done to our children, apparently he does not want the same treatment for his own– they go to a private school. Commissioner King may be able to spare his children the abuse and degradation of a system that intentionally sets students up for failure, but the rest of are being told that we do not have the right to refuse. Rather, we are being told that this is the price of a public education.

Maybe your child is a struggling learner. Maybe she reads below grade level and has just had her self-esteem gutted by a test. Or, maybe your child is brilliant and eats the 5th grade ELA exam for breakfast. Both are being short-changed; why go outside the curriculum to challenge a student, to help him pursue a special interest that he’s passionate about if it’s not on the test? Conversely, how can teachers spend additional time explaining and re-teaching a concept when they are under tremendous pressure to stick to a curriculum schedule dictated by the test? We must stand up for the needs of all children, and for common sense. If we continue to stick with a “one size fits all” approach, someone is going to be left out in the cold, whether it’s the struggling learner or the child prodigy.

If you are the parent of a kindergartener, you may think that this is something that you do not have to deal with yet. I hate to burst your bubble, but your child is already being prepped for the 3rd grade ELA exam. The days of carefree coloring, self-directed learning and exploration are already over. Because of the new teacher evaluation system, 4 and 5 year olds are being given pre-tests filled with questions that they can’t answer, for the sole purpose of achieving a baseline by which to grade their teachers. This is how we welcome them to the long and rigorous path to career and college readiness.

You should also know that the corporation that is making the NYS tests and profiting handsomely from them is also putting your child to work. Each test contains something known as “field test questions.” These are questions that Pearson is “trying out.” They do not count towards your child’s overall score, but they do tax their energy and efforts, efforts that could otherwise be spent on the questions that count. Also, your child may be taking something called a field test in June (and by the way, the school does not have to inform you that he will be taking it.) The field test is an experimental test to help Pearson design more tests and make more money. They are using your child as a guinea pig, and NYS state is only too happy to play pimp.

You should also know that the teachers at your child’s school are most likely responsible for scoring the test. That means that they will have to be pulled out of class for a day or even 2 days. During that time, your district will have to hire substitute teachers, and the extra money for that will come from your district’s already stretched budget. Your child’s teachers will be asked to sign a confidentiality agreement before scoring the test that prevents them from ever discussing what was on the test with you, the parent, or with anyone else. In the past, NYS tests became public after they were scored. Now, for the first time ever, after completion the tests will go under lock and key, never to see the light of day or the eye of public scrutiny. Your hard-earned tax dollars are paying for a product that will never have to undergo any kind of public quality control.

Some of you may have heard the line from Albany that parents who oppose the test do not want to know where there child stands “on the path to career and college readiness.” I hope that you find that as offensive and patronizing as I do. I would think that one of the foundational skills for college readiness is the desire to learn. It’s common sense that to succeed in college, you need to want to be there in the first place. By exposing children to developmentally inappropriate testing, we are creating burnouts. I don’t know if you care where your 8-year-old is on his path to “career readiness,” but I bet that you do care about his love for school and learning. And try as I might, I cannot explain how a test result that will not be available until next October will benefit any of our children. Their teachers won’t see the test results in time to use them to plan instruction and target areas of weakness, and the score reports do not show growth. So whom, then, do these “rigorous” tests benefit? I have a feeling that if our children flunk the test and our schools are deemed to be in failing health, Pearson will be only too happy to sell us the cure.

Parents, I know that you are busy. I know what it’s like to live a life that is an endless shuffle between work, activities, doctor’s appointments and the mini-crises that seem to pop up several times a week. You are tired. I get it. But if there was ever a time to call on that little reserve of brain power and energy that we parents save for when the s@&t really hits the fan, this is it. We are at a tipping point in education. Big money corporations and politicians with questionable motives are monitoring our apathy. They are counting on the grind of daily life to distract parents from the fact that the profiteers are twisting their moustaches while quietly tapping into the multi-billion dollar market that is our children’s education.

Act now, before a corporate, high stakes test driven education becomes a way of life. Be the Rosa Parks, the Erin Brockovich, the Rachel Carson, the Homer Plessy, the Karen Silkwood. Better yet, do what a friend did, and engage in some real learning. Play hooky from work, take your kid to the library, and read about these whistle blowers and activists. Make some signs. Make some noise. Your kids will never forget that you took a stand for them.

Sincerely,
Bianca Tanis
Hudson Valley Parent and Educator
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1399390 --- 04/28/13 02:46 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/28/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
Quote:
and the score reports do not show growth.


In this:

http://www.opportunitynyc.net/education/elamath

Is this:

HOW TO GET YOUR ELA AND MATH TEST REWARDS!

Families with children in public school in grades three through eight automatically receive Rewards if a child scores a level 3 or 4 or improves an ELA or Math test score by one level over the previous year.
GRADES 3-5: Families earn $300 per ELA and Math test. If the child passes both tests, families will receive $600.
GRADES 6-8: Families earn $350 per ELA and Math test. If the child passes both tests, families will receive $700.

It looks like this effort, from the evil private sector, gives rewards for growth, which "improvement" can be categorized as, year to year.

Quote:
And although the commissioner is OK with this being done to our children, apparently he does not want the same treatment for his own– they go to a private school.


http://www.time4learning.com/testprep/index.php/new-york-state-standardized-test-prep/

'New York State Testing Program at a Glance
New York State public, charter, and private school students take the following New York State standardized tests:

NYSTP: 3rd Grade – 8th Grade
Aligned to New York State Standards, which define what students should learn each year, the NYSTP tests measure how well students are meeting grade-level expectations. Students in 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th grades take level-specific NYSTP tests in English language arts, which includes writing, and math. Fourth graders and eighth graders also take the New York State science test for their level. In addition, 5th grade and 8th grade students are given the New York State social studies test."

Quote:
Maybe your child is a struggling learner. Maybe she reads below grade level and has just had her self-esteem gutted by a test...If we continue to stick with a “one size fits all” approach, someone is going to be left out in the cold, whether it’s the struggling learner or the child prodigy.


"Other New York State Standardized Tests
The New York State Testing Program uses a balanced range of assessments that promote learning for all students. The New York State Alternate Assessment (NYSAA) is designed to measure the progress of students with severe disabilities who require special accommodations. Students in grades K-12 with Limited English Proficiency take the New York State English as a Second Language
 Achievement Test (NYSESLAT), which annually measures their progress in meeting NYS standards in reading and language arts."


Edited by VM Smith (04/28/13 03:08 PM)
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1399521 --- 04/29/13 08:30 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 32045
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: twocats
The NYS teacher’s union, NYSUT, recently ran a campaign called “Tell It Like It Is.” Teachers were invited to share how the new mandates are impacting their students. In one of the testimonials, a teacher talked about how her third grade student was so anxious that he vomited on the 3rd grade ELA exam.


what if a school taxpayer gets sick writing out the check for the school taxes

can they avoid paying them?
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1399545 --- 04/30/13 08:56 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 32045
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: twocats
You should also know that the teachers at your child’s school are most likely responsible for scoring the test. That means that they will have to be pulled out of class for a day or even 2 days.


just volunteer your weekend

after all it is about the STUDENTS
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"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1399817 --- 05/02/13 07:04 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: bluezone]
Festus Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 08/31/10
Posts: 1484
Loc: On yer nerves.
We used to sit for hours to take the Iowa Tests. What's the issue? Are you afraid your child might actually leave school with an education?
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I was brought into this world without my consent,
and will leave in the same manner.

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#1399899 --- 05/02/13 02:57 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: Festus]
Dr117 Offline
Member

Registered: 06/27/12
Posts: 435
Loc: Way out West
Festua isn't that what parents are for? You children and my god-sn all turned out educated very well as have all mine.
Parents need to get involved a 100% more.
_________________________
Attitude is everything!

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#1399903 --- 05/02/13 04:12 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: Dr117]
Festus Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 08/31/10
Posts: 1484
Loc: On yer nerves.
The kids couldn't have learned without the teachers doing their job. Do you remember how things were when we were in school? It didn't matter if you "felt good". What mattered was learning.
_________________________
I was brought into this world without my consent,
and will leave in the same manner.

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#1400106 --- 05/03/13 08:06 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: Festus]
Dr117 Offline
Member

Registered: 06/27/12
Posts: 435
Loc: Way out West
I too learned we had to walk a mile both ways up hill to get to the bus. Snow.rain sleet,hot it did not matter we had to go sick or not and we learned. 1st to respect others then ourselves.
Never talk back. No gum was allowed,no talking unless called upon or playing around nothing but complete attention at all times. You had to stay late if help was needed. No kids left behind like todat.Today if you can learn fast you are a star. need help,teachers do not have the time after an all day of work.
So some kids are left behind to depend on their parents and that's only if the parents could care enough to help other wise just just shove you onto the next grade. NOT GOOD!
_________________________
Attitude is everything!

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#1404499 --- 06/10/13 09:30 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: bluezone]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 32045
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: twocats
You should also know that the teachers at your child’s school are most likely responsible for scoring the test. That means that they will have to be pulled out of class for a day or even 2 days.


and how many days have you been absent?


_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1407559 --- 07/01/13 03:37 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: bluezone]
cwjga Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 9902
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: twocats
You should also know that the teachers at your child’s school are most likely responsible for scoring the test. That means that they will have to be pulled out of class for a day or even 2 days.


and how many days have you been absent?




In some cases they even wrote the test.
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Annoying liberals, it's just too easy. Hard to believe how easy it is.

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#1421710 --- 10/13/13 11:43 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: cwjga]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 32045
Loc: USA
must have been over their long summer 'vacation'...

lol
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1423506 --- 10/24/13 06:51 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
In the spring of 2011 I received a receipt for the sale of my children. It came in the form of a flyer that simply notified me that my state and thereby my children’s school would comply with the Common Core. No other details of the transaction were included. The transaction was complete, and I had no say. In fact, it was the very first time I’d heard about it.

I know what you’re thinking. That’s outrageous! Common Core has nothing to do with selling things, especially not children!

Okay, so the idea that the State School Board and Governor who’d made this decision could be described as “selling” my children is hyperbole. It is an exaggeration intended to convey an emotion regarding who, in this land of the free, has ultimate authority over decisions that directly affect my children’s intellectual development, privacy, and future opportunities. It is not even an accurate representation of my initial reaction to the flyer. I say it to make a point that I didn’t realize until much, much later… this isn’t just an issue of education, but of money and control. Please allow me to explain.

That first day my husband picked up the flyer and asked me, “What is Common Core?” To be honest, I had no idea. We looked it up online. We read that they were standards for each grade that would be consistent across a number of states. They were described as higher standards, internationally benchmarked, state-led, and inclusive of parent and teacher in-put. It didn’t sound like a bad thing, but why hadn’t we ever heard about it before? Again, did I miss the parent in-put meeting or questionnaire… the vote in our legislature? Who from my state had helped to write the standards? In consideration of the decades of disagreement on education trends that I’ve observed regarding education, how in the world did that many states settle all their differences enough to agree on the same standards? It must have taken years, right? How could I have missed it?

At first it was really difficult to get answers to all my questions. I started by asking the people who were in charge of implementing the standards at the school district office, and later talked with my representative on the local school board. I made phone calls and I went to public meetings. We talked a lot about the standards themselves. No one seemed to know the answers to, or wanted to talk about my questions about how the decision was made, the cost, or how it influenced my ability as a parent to advocate for my children regarding curriculum. I even had the chance to ask the Governor himself at a couple of local political meetings. I was always given a similar response. It usually went something like this:

Question: “How much will this cost?”

Answer: “These are really good standards.”

Question: “I read that the Algebra that was offered in 8th grade, will now not be offered until 9th grade. How is this a higher standard?”

Answer: “These are better standards. They go deeper into concepts.”

Question: “Was there a public meeting that I missed?”

Answer: “You should really read the standards. This is a good thing.”

Question: “Isn’t it against the Constitution and the law of the land to have a national curriculum under the control of the federal government?’

Answer: “Don’t you want your kids to have the best curriculum?”

It got to the point where I felt like I was talking to Jedi masters who, instead of actually answering my questions, would wave their hand in my face and say, “You will like these standards.”

I stopped asking. I started reading.

I read the standards. I read about who wrote the standards. I read about the timeline of how we adopted the standards (before the standards were written.) I read my state’s Race to the Top grant application, in which we said we were going to adopt the standards. I read the rejection of that grant application and why we wouldn’t be given additional funding to pay for this commitment. I read how standardized national test scores are measured and how states are ranked. I read news articles, blogs, technical documents, legislation, speeches given by the US Education Secretary and other principle players, and even a few international resolutions regarding education.

I learned a lot.

I learned that most other parents didn’t know what the Common Core was either.

I learned that the standards were state accepted, but definitely not “state led.”

I learned that the international benchmark claim is a pretty shaky one and doesn’t mean they are better than or even equal to international standards that are considered high.

I learned that there was NO public input before the standards were adopted. State-level decision makers had very little time themselves and had to agree to them in principle as the actual standards were not yet complete.

I learned that the only content experts on the panel to review the standards had refused to sign off on them, and why they thought the standards were flawed.

I learned that much of the specific standards are not supported by research but are considered experimental.

I learned that in addition to national standards we agreed to new national tests that are funded and controlled by the federal government.

I learned that in my state, a portion of teacher pay is dependent on student test performance.

I learned that not only test scores, but additional personal information about my children and our family would be tracked in a state-wide data collection project for the express purpose of making decisions about their educational path and “aligning” them with the workforce.

I learned that there are fields for tracking home-schooled children in this database too.

I learned that the first step toward getting pre-school age children into this data project is currently underway with new legislation that would start a new state preschool program.

I learned that this data project was federally funded with a stipulation that it be compatible with other state’s data projects. Wouldn’t this feature create a de facto national database of children?

I learned that my parental rights to deny the collection of this data or restrict who has access to it have been changed at the federal level through executive regulation, not the legislative process.

I learned that these rights as protected under state law are currently under review and could also be changed.

I learned that the financing, writing, evaluation, and promotion of the standards had all been done by non-governmental special interest groups with a common agenda.

I learned that their agenda was in direct conflict with what I consider to be the best interests of my children, my family, and even my country.

Yes, I had concerns about the standards themselves, but suddenly that issue seemed small in comparison to the legal, financial, constitutional and representative issues hiding behind the standards and any good intentions to improve the educational experience of my children.

If it was really about the best standards, why did we adopt them before they were even written?

If they are so wonderful that all, or even a majority of parents would jump for joy to have them implemented, why wasn’t there any forum for parental input?

What about the part where I said I felt my children had been sold? I learned that the U.S. market for education is one of the most lucrative – bigger than energy or technology by one account – especially in light of these new national standards that not only create economy of scale for education vendors, but require schools to purchase all new materials, tests and related technology. Almost everything the schools had was suddenly outdated.

When I discovered that the vendors with the biggest market share and in the position to profit the most from this new regulation had actually helped write or finance the standards, the mama bear inside me ROARED!

Could it be that the new standards had more to do with profit than what was best for students? Good thing for their shareholders they were able to avoid a messy process involving parents or their legislative representatives.

As I kept note of the vast sums of money exchanging hands in connection with these standards with none of it going to address the critical needs of my local school – I felt cheated.

When I was told that the end would justify the means, that it was for the common good of our children and our society, and to sit back and trust that they had my children’s best interests at heart – they lost my trust.

As I listened to the Governor and education policy makers on a state and national level speak about my children and their education in terms of tracking, alignment, workforce, and human capital – I was offended.

When I was told that this is a done deal, and there was nothing as a parent or citizen that I could do about it – I was motivated.

Finally, I learned one more very important thing. I am not the only one who feels this way. Across the nation parents grandparents and other concerned citizens are educating themselves, sharing what they have learned and coming together. The problem is, it is not happening fast enough. Digging through all the evidence, as I have done, takes a lot of time – far more time than the most people are able to spend. In order to help, I summarized what I thought was some of the most important information into a flowchart so that others could see at a glance what I was talking about.

I am not asking you to take my word for it. I want people to check the references and question the sources. I am not asking for a vote or for money. I don’t expect everyone to agree with me. I do believe with all my heart that a decision that affects the children of almost every state in the country should not be made without a much broader discussion, validated research, and much greater input from parents and citizens than it was originally afforded.

If you agree I encourage you to share this information. Post it, pin it, email it, tweet it.

No more decisions behind closed doors! Let’s get everyone talking about Common Core.

_________________________________

Thanks to Alyson Williams for permission to publish her story.

Sources for research: http://www.utahnsagainstcommoncore.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/FlowchartSources.pdf
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1423679 --- 10/25/13 06:24 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 4810
Loc: West End
Originally Posted By: twocats

I know what you’re thinking. That’s outrageous! Common Core has nothing to do with selling things, especially not children!

As I listened to the Governor and education policy makers on a state and national level speak about my children and their education in terms of tracking, alignment, workforce, and human capital – I was offended.

When I was told that this is a done deal, and there was nothing as a parent or citizen that I could do about it – I was motivated.


Quite offensive.


Motivational article! Chant down these fools...

"We are striving to align educational outcomes with employer needs more than ever before, and that starts with greater flexibility on federal education policies that affect states."
- Utah Governor Herbert was also recently tagged for the NGA's Executive Committee.

_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell


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#1423745 --- 10/26/13 10:49 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: Teonan]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Some schools in DC are implementing standardized testing to 3 and 4 year old students to judge their pre-school program. This has changed some classroom instruction. Everything is high stakes now, and there will be consequences. From the comment section in the Washington Post article:

Forty years ago psychologists Mark Lepper and David Greene demonstrated in an experiment with preschoolers how rewards can backfire. Particularly with an activity that students already enjoy-intrinsic motivation- (in the instant case helping friends) rewarding students-extrinsic motivation- leads to less enjoyment. http://www.spring.org.uk/2009/10/how-rewards-can-b...

Good parable here too. A shopkeeper was frustrated because kids in the neighborhood would come and throw rocks at his shop, often breaking the windows and he couldn't get the police to do anything. One day he came out while the kids were throwing rocks and told the leader that if they would come back the next day and throw rocks at his shop he would reward them by giving each a quarter. The next day when the kids threw the rocks he paid them off and then told them that if they came the next day and threw the rocks he would pay them each a dime. After paying them off on that day he told the leader that because business was bad he would only be able to pay them each a nickle the next day. The leader snorted and said that the boys weren't going to waste their time for just a nickel. The kids never returned and the shopkeeper's problem was solved.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1424317 --- 10/30/13 04:18 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 9902
Loc: NY





From a hard working educator



I work hard. I spend my days (and most evenings) preparing the best education I can for the children of my district. I have spoken to comissioner King, I have read and studied the common core, I have attended meeting after meeting in Albany. I have THE most current and accurate information at my fingertips. I have worked with my teachers to help them to accept the responsibility that is theirs as professional educators. I have resisted the urge to post on facebook as I try to leave my professional life out of my personal life, however, I can stay silent NO MORE. Today I have seen posts about petitions to fire King and for paretns to protest common core by keeping their children home from school. This witch hunt needs to end. To my friends that are parents and frustrated with "common core"...educatate yourself. Many of you are frustrated with curriculum modules, NOT common core. You don't even know what you are referring to! Just because "New math" is HARD doesn't mean that we shouldn't do it!! Kids are learning to problem solve and persist in ways that will help them succeed in life. There is no other way!! I would also warn you against keeping your children home from school to run from something that is challenging and difficult. Sending a message to your children to hide when times are hard, is NOT going to help the situation. We have raised enough children that think everything should be handed to them and that they don't have to work for anything. Teaching them to persist through difficult times is what will make them better people...you are mistaken if you think that keeping kids home from school will help...you will be damaging their beliefs about school and the importance of hard work. To my teacher friends that are constantly complaining about "common core"....you are professionals. DO NOT mix your frustration of being held accountable with what is best for kids. The reality is that over 60% of the students going into the college setting from graduating high school HAVE to be placed in remedial math and english. You can complain all you want and say that we are doing just fine the way we are, but the TRUTH is we AREN'T. We MUST do something different. What we have been doing DOES NOT WORK. To fix something broken, we have to try something new. This is what we are trying. Is it hard? yes. But as I tell students, hard just means that there is learning happening! I have met Comissioner King and spoken to him directly. I believe in common core and what is happening in our state. Is it perfect? NO. It's messy. But so was the civil rights movement, the women's rights movement, and so will be the educational reform movement. You are making history. Be proud.
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#1424370 --- 10/30/13 10:39 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Shame on her for waiting for a national curriculum to raise the standards for her students. All of the educators I work with teach each child to the fullest extent of their abilities. None of them need a set of national standards to take each child to his or her fullest potential. Our children are not common and they do not all learn at the same rate nor in the same way. She should be ashamed if it took a set of 'standards' to make her realize that.


Edited by twocats (10/30/13 10:39 PM)
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#1424406 --- 10/31/13 06:32 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 9902
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats
Shame on her for waiting for a national curriculum to raise the standards for her students. All of the educators I work with teach each child to the fullest extent of their abilities. None of them need a set of national standards to take each child to his or her fullest potential. Our children are not common and they do not all learn at the same rate nor in the same way. She should be ashamed if it took a set of 'standards' to make her realize that.


Wow that is what you took from that. So sad. You have really have the blame somebody else tactic down to a science. No wonder our education system is in ruin.
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Annoying liberals, it's just too easy. Hard to believe how easy it is.

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#1424495 --- 10/31/13 06:54 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: cwjga]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Originally Posted By: cwjga
Originally Posted By: twocats
Shame on her for waiting for a national curriculum to raise the standards for her students. All of the educators I work with teach each child to the fullest extent of their abilities. None of them need a set of national standards to take each child to his or her fullest potential. Our children are not common and they do not all learn at the same rate nor in the same way. She should be ashamed if it took a set of 'standards' to make her realize that.


Wow that is what you took from that. So sad. You have really have the blame somebody else tactic down to a science. No wonder our education system is in ruin.


See, that is exactly the blind follower answer I expected out of you. I think most politicians are scam artists. I don't think they know more about teaching young children than I do. But, hey, it's a free country. If you want to blindly follow Obama and Cuomo into this education $$$ throwaway, that's your right.

You also have the 'blame game' backwards. I didn't need someone to tell me to do my job. Apparently, the teacher you quoted did.

Thank God my principal has more faith in teachers than in politicians. I am still allowed to design my own lessons to meet the needs of my students.
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Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1424501 --- 10/31/13 07:52 PM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Add ANOTHER superintendent who gets it.

SOME OF YOU ARE ASKING ABOUT WRITING S.L.O.s (SED has a lot of SLOWS) anyway... I would recommend

1. TEACH KIDS
2. TEACH KIDS WHAT THEY NEED TO KNOW
3. TEACH KIDS WHAT THEY NEED TO KNOW WHEN THEN NEED TO KNOW IT

That is what BATs do!!!!
Dr. John Metallo (teacher, AD, Coach, HS Principal, Superintendent in NY for 40+ years and proud to serve with all of you) johngmetallo@live.com 518 577 7530
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Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1424550 --- 11/01/13 06:39 AM Re: Dear Parents [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 9902
Loc: NY
It is unfortunate that you can not see the forest for the trees. Rather than reading the educators comments and looking at them from a different perspective, you lash out and make that person the enemy.

Sad that you are both right, but you just can not see it.
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