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#1363180 - 09/10/12 09:50 AM THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 2771
Loc: Cayuga bioregion

Solidarity with Chicago Teachers Union!



Why We're Striking in Chicago
'Join Our Fight for Education Justice,' says CTU President Karen Lewis

Common Dreams
by Karen Lewis

September 10, 2012

Teachers, paraprofessionals and school clinicians in Chicago have been without a labor agreement since June of this year. Following the inability of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to reach an agreement over benefits, the role of standardized tests in teacher evaluations, and physical improvements to schools that teachers say are harming both teacher and student performance, the CTU has announced that a city-wide stirke will begin today -- the first teachers strike in 25 years. Pickets are expected at 675 schools and the Board of Education. The following are remarks from CTU President Karen Lewis.Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis speaks at a press conference Sunday night.


Negotiations have been intense but productive, however we have failed to reach an agreement that will prevent a labor strike. This is a difficult decision and one we hoped we could avoid. Throughout these negotiations have I remained hopeful but determined. We must do things differently in this city if we are to provide our students with the education they so rightfully deserve.

Talks have been productive in many areas. We have successfully won concessions for nursing mothers and have put more than 500 of our members back to work. We have restored some of the art, music, world language, technology and physical education classes to many of our students. The Board also agreed that we will now have textbooks on the first day of school rather than have our students and teachers wait up to six weeks before receiving instructional materials.

Recognizing the Board’s fiscal woes, we are not far apart on compensation. However, we are apart on benefits. We want to maintain the existing health benefits.

Another concern is evaluation procedures. After the initial phase-in of the new evaluation system it could result in 6,000 teachers (or nearly 30 percent of our members) being discharged within one or two years. This is unacceptable. We are also concerned that too much of the new evaluations will be based on students’ standardized test scores. This is no way to measure the effectiveness of an educator. Further there are too many factors beyond our control which impact how well some students perform on standardized tests such as poverty, exposure to violence, homelessness, hunger and other social issues beyond our control.

We want job security. Despite a new curriculum and new, stringent evaluation system, CPS proposes no increase (or even decreases) in teacher training. This is notable because our Union through our Quest Center is at the forefront teacher professional development in Illinois. We have been lauded by the District and our colleagues across the country for our extensive teacher training programs that helped emerging teachers strengthen their craft and increased the number of nationally board certified educators.

We are demanding a reasonable timetable for the installation of air-conditioning in student classrooms--a sweltering, 98-degree classroom is not a productive learning environment for children. This type of environment is unacceptable for our members and all school personnel. A lack of climate control is unacceptable to our parents.

As we continue to bargain in good faith, we stand in solidarity with parents, clergy and community-based organizations who are advocating for smaller class sizes, a better school day and an elected school board. Class size matters. It matters to parents. In the third largest school district in Illinois there are only 350 social workers—putting their caseloads at nearly 1,000 students each. We join them in their call for more social workers, counselors, audio/visual and hearing technicians and school nurses. Our children are exposed to unprecedented levels of neighborhood violence and other social issues, so the fight for wraparound services is critically important to all of us. Our members will continue to support this ground swell of parent activism and grassroots engagement on these issues. And we hope the Board will not shut these voices out.

While new Illinois law prohibits us from striking over the recall of laid-off teachers and compensation for a longer school year, we do not intend to sign an agreement until these matters are addressed.

Again, we are committed to staying at the table until a contract is place. However, in the morning no CTU member will be inside our schools. We will walk the picket lines. We will talk to parents. We will talk to clergy. We will talk to the community. We will talk to anyone who will listen—we demand a fair contract today, we demand a fair contract now. And, until there is one in place that our members accept, we will on the line.

We stand in solidarity with our brothers and sisters throughout the state and country who are currently bargaining for their own fair contracts. We stand with those who have already declared they too are prepared to strike, in the best interests of their students.

This announcement is made now so our parents and community are empowered with this knowledge and will know that schools will not open on tomorrow. Please seek alternative care for your children. And, we ask all of you to join us in our education justice fight—for a fair contract—and call on the mayor and CEO Brizard to settle this matter now. Thank you.
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell

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#1363185 - 09/10/12 10:09 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: Teonan]
SportsRef1 Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/30/03
Posts: 3199
Loc: Seneca County
NO!

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#1363188 - 09/10/12 10:17 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: Teonan]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 2771
Loc: Cayuga bioregion
Gloria Steinem supports Chicago teachers on strike.


by Gloria Steinem

09/09/2012

Gloria Steinem, Co-Founder of the Women’s Media Center, released the following statement this evening:

“Tonight, I proudly wear a red t-shirt in support of the Chicago Teachers Union strike. They have been forced to strike – for the first time in 25 years – by the false economy of firing and penalizing the experienced teachers most needed by the students and by new teachers; by lengthening the school day as warehousing without educational services, healthy school buildings, and paid teachers; by what they have the knowledge to call the “apartheid-like system” of differential discipline policies; and by what seems to be a national tactic of demonizing teachers in order to turn public schools into corporate profit centers.

“For instance, three years ago, a Stanford Study found that ‘students in charter schools are not faring as well as students in traditional public school.’ I’m glad to see that in a recent poll, twice as many Chicagoans trusted the Chicago Teachers Union, not the Mayor, when it comes to public education.

“As an 87% female workforce, and one that is nearly half African American and Latino, the Chicago Teachers Union know what their students need. This is why this country needs unions, collective bargaining, and mayors who recognize, honor and fairly pay the people our children know – and who know our children.” Steinem continued, "I join my colleagues at The Women's Media Center, in calling on the media to ensure that women are part of this story — as teachers, parents, union members, and as journalists.”

Gloria Steinem, is an author, organizer and co-founder of Coalition of Labor Union Women and the Women's Media Center. She is also proud to be a member of SAG-AFTRA and the Authors Guild.
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell

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#1363270 - 09/10/12 06:58 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: Teonan]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11883
Loc: NYS
Solidarity!


Teachers went into 63rd street police station to use bathroom and got a standing ovation from police
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1363272 - 09/10/12 07:00 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: twocats]
Offline

Senior Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 7644
Originally Posted By: twocats
Solidarity!


Teachers went into 63rd street police station to use bathroom and got a standing ovation from police


Quote:
Solidarity!
Greed!

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#1363292 - 09/10/12 07:49 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: ]
sands Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/05/05
Posts: 7506
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: Chicago Jesus
Originally Posted By: twocats

Solidarity!
Greed!



Greed? How are Chicago teachers going to live with only a 16% raise this year? Far less than the raise most of you got this year.

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#1363294 - 09/10/12 07:53 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: sands]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11883
Loc: NYS
Pay attention. Everything you read on the Internet isn't true. They accepted 3% this year and 2% for each of the following 3 years.
They are striking over other matters too complex for your small mind to understand.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1363297 - 09/10/12 08:04 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: twocats]
sands Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 09/05/05
Posts: 7506
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats
Pay attention. Everything you read on the Internet isn't true. They accepted 3% this year and 2% for each of the following 3 years.
They are striking over other matters too complex for your small mind to understand.



Everything you read on the Internet isn't true.

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#1363298 - 09/10/12 08:10 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: twocats]
Offline

Senior Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 7644
Originally Posted By: twocats
Pay attention. Everything you read on the Internet isn't true. They accepted 3% this year and 2% for each of the following 3 years.
They are striking over other matters too complex for your small mind to understand.


Quote:
They are striking over other matters too complex for your small mind to understand.


Ahahahahahahahahaha...true to the bone!

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#1363356 - 09/11/12 11:47 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: twocats]
SportsRef1 Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/30/03
Posts: 3199
Loc: Seneca County
Originally Posted By: twocats
Solidarity!


Teachers went into 63rd street police station to use bathroom and got a standing ovation from police



2 examples why Illinois has a $44 billion state deficit.

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#1363366 - 09/11/12 01:24 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: SportsRef1]
Zealot Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/29/08
Posts: 2015
Loc: Yates
Well this is certainly becoming a pickle for Obama! Romney/Ryan have just come out in support of Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the kids, against the teachers strike.

Highest paid public school teachers in the country = worst performing public schools in the country.

Of course Obama has to support his unions but he is keeping pretty quiet on this one.

This one is going to be fun to watch.
_________________________
"The best argument against Democracy is a 5 minute conversation with the average voter" - unknown

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#1363372 - 09/11/12 03:11 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: Zealot]
Offline

Senior Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 7644
Originally Posted By: Zealot
Well this is certainly becoming a pickle for Obama! Romney/Ryan have just come out in support of Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the kids, against the teachers strike.

Highest paid public school teachers in the country = worst performing public schools in the country.

Of course Obama has to support his unions but he is keeping pretty quiet on this one.

This one is going to be fun to watch.



Solidarity!

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#1363387 - 09/11/12 05:33 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: ]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 29589
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: twocats
Solidarity!


Teachers went into 63rd street police station to use bathroom and got a standing ovation from police


did the homeowners/taxpayers and businesses refuse to let them use their bathrooms?
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1363388 - 09/11/12 05:36 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: bluezone]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 29589
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: twocats

Teachers went into 63rd street police station to use bathroom and got a standing ovation from police


the mayor should outlaw this as the taxpayers have to pay for the toilet paper, water, soap and towels

charge each one $5 to use the bathroom

or let them pay for their own portapotties
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1363403 - 09/11/12 06:20 PM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: Teonan]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/09/10
Posts: 11883
Loc: NYS
We are always striving to use best practices in education. Those who make the rules refuse to do this.


Director of Private School Where Rahm Sends His Kids Opposes Using Testing for Teacher Evaluations
BY MIKE ELK

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel eschews the city's public schools in favor of the University of Chicago Lab School, who director eschews Emanuel's idea of "reform."   (Zol87/Flickr/Creative Commons)

Unlike occasional teacher union opponent Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel does not send his kids to public schools. Instead, Emanuel's children attend one of the most elite prep schools in Chicago, the University of Chicago Lab School, where the annual tuition is more than $20,000. (Emanuel has repeatedly refused to answer questions about why he eschews public schools for his children, telling reporters that it is a private family decision.)

The conditions at the University of Chicago Lab Schools are dramatically different than those at Chicago Public Schools, which are currently closed with teachers engaged in a high-profile strike. The Lab School has seven full-time art teachers to serve a student population of 1,700. By contrast, only 25% of Chicago’s “neighborhood elementary schools” have both a full-time art and music instructor. The Lab School has three different libraries, while 160 Chicago public elementary schools do not have a library.

“Physical education, world languages, libraries and the arts are not frills. They are an essential piece of a well-rounded education,” wrote University of Chicago Lab School Director David Magill on the school's website in February 2009.

Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) President Karen Lewis agrees with Magill, and believes what works for Mayor Emanuel’s kids should be a prescription for the rest of the city.  

“I’m actually glad that he did [send his kids to Lab School] because it gave me an opportunity to look at how the Lab school functions,” Lewis told Chicago magazine in November 2011. “I thought he gave us a wonderful pathway to seeing what a good education looks like, and I think he’s absolutely right, and so we love that model. We would love to see that model throughout.”

One of the key sticking points in union negotiations is that Emanuel wants to use standardized tests scores to count for 40 percent of the basis of teacher evaluations. Earlier this year, more than 80 researchers from 16 Chicago-area universities signed an open letter to Emanuel, criticizing the use of standardized test scores for this purpose. “The new evaluation system for teachers and principals centers on misconceptions about student growth, with potentially negative impact on the education of Chicago’s children,” they wrote. 
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1363486 - 09/12/12 09:20 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: twocats]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 2771
Loc: Cayuga bioregion
Stand Against Rahm! The Chicago Teachers' Strike Is the Next Chapter in the Fight Against Plutocracy

Chicago isn’t seeing its teachers as greedy. They’re seeing them as a vanguard in the struggle against what might happen to the rest of the middle class next if they don’t speak.




Rick Perlstein
September 12, 2012

CHICAGO — I was awoken by honking car horns yesterday morning, and couldn’t have been happier for the fact. Chicago’s public schoolteachers are on strike against the city government and Mayor Rahm Emanuel. And while no one likes the budget crisis that forms the strike’s fiscal context, nor the fact that 350,000 students aren’t at school, much of Chicago is finding joy in the municipal impasse — which is why, anywhere within earshot of the schools where the Chicago Teachers Union’s 25,500 members are picketing in front of their workplaces, solidarity car horns are blasting away.

Since Rahm Emanuel’s election in the spring of 2011, Chicago’s teachers have been asked to eat s*** by a mayor obsessed with displaying to the universe his “toughness” — toughness with the working-class people that make the city tick; toughness with the protesters standing up to say “no”; but never, ever toughness with the vested interests, including anti-union charter school advocates, who poured $12 million into his coffers to elect him mayor (his closet competitor raised $2.5 million). The roots of the strike began when Emanuel announced his signature education initiative: extending Chicago’s school day. Overwhelmingly, Chicago’s teachers support lengthening the day, which is the shortest of any major district in the country. Just not the way Rahm wanted to ram it down their throats: 20 percent more work; 2 percent more pay.

He had already canceled a previously negotiated 4 percent cost-of-living raise, and accused teachers who balked of not caring about their students. The teachers’ response to this abuse is something all of us should be paying attention to. If Chapter 1 of the American people’s modern grass-roots fight against the plutocracy was the demonstrations at the Wisconsin State Capitol in the spring of 2011, and Chapter 2 was the Occupy encampments of that summer, the Chicago Teachers Union’s stand against Emanuel should go down as Chapter 3. It’s been inspiration to anyone frustrated that people have forgotten how good it feels to stand up to bullies — and how effective it can be.

The CTU lost the first skirmish last year when Emanuel trundled down to the state capitol in Springfield to wire a new statute sure to forestall accountability for his draconian plan: alone among Illinois municipal workers, teachers would need a 75 percent vote among their membership to authorize a strike. Then in June of this year, after a rally that overflowed a 3,929-capacity theater with red CTU T-shirts, almost 90 percent of members voted through that authorization, should their leaders choose to call a strike. Counting spoiled ballots, the number of teachers voting against the authorization amounted to little more than a handful.

Teachers trust their leadership. They don’t trust the mayor — who the union’s feisty president, Karen Lewis, claims told her at a social outing at the ballet shortly after his election “that 25 percent of the students in this city are never going to be anything, never going to amount to anything and he was never going to throw money at them.” The exchange points to a key hinge in the story: Who in the dispute, the teachers’ union or the mayor, most earnestly has the interests of “the children” at heart?

The CTU stumbled in negotiations out of the gate, asking for a 30 percent raise that made them look just like the mercenary self-seekers right-wing critics always claim municipal unions are: a cash-extorting cartel against the taxpaying public. But Lewis later dialed that down to 19 percent. And Rahm has never had Chicago citizens with him on the issue — he’s just arrogantly acted as if he had. In one poll this spring 40 percent of Chicago Public School parents said they “side the most” with the teachers, only 17 percent with the mayor. Black voters who gave Emanuel a majority of their votes over Carol Moseley Braun, the first African-American senator since reconstruction, are especially alienated by his treatment of the teachers — a backbone of the black professional class.

Chicagoans came to trust the union further after system president Jean-Claude Brizard expressed frustration that the authorization vote came before an arbitrator’s fact-finding report came down — but which, when it did, largely aligned with the union’s positions. Meanwhile the public has mostly come to believe the broader story they’re telling: that this struggle is ultimately about improving kids’ learning experience (including preserving arts and physical education, keeping class size in check and enhancing services in the classroom), and that treating teachers fairly only helps kids in the end. The union also makes the morally compelling argument that yoking the survival of struggling schools to their test scores disrupts the education of the most vulnerable students — though they’re also able to make the utilitarian argument that those scores have been rising.

So for now, the momentum rests with them. A Labor Day rally in Daley Plaza in front of the soaring black Mies van der Rohe civic center was probably the most impressive political demonstration in that marquee Chicago public space since 2010′s massive immigration march (that one had city support). It concluded with an unpermitted street action, as thousands poured into Washington Street to symbolically shout up at Rahm Emanuel’s fifth floor City Hall office. The unplanned outburst of exuberance trapped several unwitting civilians’ cars inside the scrum. Cops — cheerful cops, surely thrilled at the solidarity they would likely enjoy when their contracts came up for renegotiation — parted the crowd to let them through. One motorist I saw began leaning heavily on the horn. But not from frustration. Her other hand formed a fist and shot into the air. She was beaming, apparently thrilled to be caught inside history.

Chicago public schoolteachers don’t have a strike fund; the lost wages come straight out of their household budgets. One kindergarten teacher of my acquaintance took to Facebook to ask for bean recipes. So though this may change if the strike turns lengthy and disruptive, Chicago isn’t seeing its teachers as greedy. They’re seeing them as a vanguard in the struggle against what might happen to the rest of the middle class next if they don’t speak up.



Rick Perlstein is the author of "Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America" and "Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus"
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell

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#1363488 - 09/12/12 09:25 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: Teonan]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 29589
Loc: USA
Stand WITH Rahm!

let the teachers walk
it was their choice
are you aware the teachers make about $135 per hour when you factor in their pay/benefits and 5.5 hours per day along with 180 days per year

greedy teachers with poor performance

funny how you want others to only get $12 per hour with no benefits
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1363490 - 09/12/12 09:31 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: bluezone]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 2771
Loc: Cayuga bioregion


The Chicago Strike Is Typical of American Politicians' War on Teachers
Teachers were once revered, with cops and firefighters. Now, the bipartisan consensus says bullying their unions is good politics

The Guardian
September 11, 2012

by Michael Paarlberg

The Chicago teachers' strike is barely a day old, and the teacher-bashing is already well underway with great gusto.Chicago teachers picketing outside Wells high school.

As you may have heard, these teachers are greedy, lazy bullies who are holding kids hostage in their mad lust for power. Their choice of profession is not at all motivated by an interest in child betterment, but entirely by the obscenely lavish salaries they receive – some even approaching those of skilled jobs that actually contribute to the public good, like sales managers and insurance underwriters. All this at – never forget – taxpayers' expense. Even liberal bloggers warn that this strike will leave children forever scarred and ruin their future earnings, or at least their test scores.

Teachers might respond that they're not striking over money: both the teachers' union and the school board acknowledge the two sides are close to agreement on wages. They might point out that their demands that are the real sticking points – smaller class sizes and air-conditioned classrooms – are entirely reasonable things most parents also want for their kids. Or they might point out that Mayor Rahm Emanuel's key demand to tie teacher evaluations to student test performance reflects a bureaucratic zeal to replace more and more of the curriculum with standardized tests (one Chicago teacher says 18 to 25 days of the school year are already lost to testing) – an ethos and aim that many parents, and certainly most students, do not share.

They could say all of this, but it wouldn't matter. Any union negotiator or human resources manager can tell you that contracts are never settled by who has the best argument. Bargaining is a question of clout, and which side has more of it. Unions have been losing ground for years, public sector unions in particular, and no unionized profession has been more vilified – by politicians, thinktanks and two Hollywood movies so far – than teachers.

Looking back, this is remarkable. There was a time when teachers were lauded as local heroes: overworked, underpaid pillars of the community who could – with their credentials – earn more elsewhere, but chose to pursue a career sharing the joys of learning with kids. Politically, they were untouchable, up there with cops and firefighters. Endorsements by their unions were prized by politicians hoping to run as "the education candidate".

Then, at a certain point, teachers' unions woke up to find their favorability rating hovering somewhere between al-Qaida's and herpes. This didn't happen overnight, but a confluence of state budget crises, urban blight and suburban flight, a well-funded school reform movement and private charter school industry created the need for a scapegoat for bad public schools. Could it be their financing structure, dependent locally on grossly unequal property tax revenues? Or their unaccountable school boards, such as the one appointed by Rahm Emanuel? Might poverty and unemployment not be to blame? The drug economy? Poor parenting?

No, none of the above. It's teachers and their pesky insistence that they know how best to educate kids simply because they spend most of the day with them.

Teachers' unions were slow to realize their scapegating and its (for them) dangerous consequences. They were slow to defend against some of the more salacious – but fact-challenged – charges against them. And they have not responded effectively by articulating why teachers should have pensions, job security and collective bargaining rights when other workers were either losing theirs or never had them in the first place.

These failures opened the way for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to make trashing teachers the centerpiece of his political career, in turn setting the stage for Scott Walker in Wisconsin and others. Hard as it is to imagine candidates running for office on a "screw the troops" platform, this is essentially the climate teachers find themselves in today.

Unfortunately for the Chicago teachers, they are unlikely to see a change in the political weather any time soon. Their union is betting, in no small part, that the embarrassment the strike will cause the Democrats in an election year will push Obama to pressure Emanuel to fix a settlement. Signs point to no such outcome. President Obama sees this as a lose-lose situation – he'll be seen either as betraying his labor allies or as caving to special interests – and has explicitly stated his intention to remain uninvolved.

Instead, the strike presents less conflict-averse Democrats like Emanuel the opportunity to posture and show off his business-friendly bona fides for Independents and Republicans (Paul Ryan has already given him words of encouragement). And nothing has more bipartisan support than blaming teachers for problems mayors and congressional representatives can't solve.


Michael Paarlberg is a writer for the Washington City Paper and the author of the recent Center for American Progress report, Making Contracting Work for the United States
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell

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#1363491 - 09/12/12 09:35 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: bluezone]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 29589
Loc: USA
Stand WITH Rahm!

overpaid teachers
let them walk
_________________________
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

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#1363493 - 09/12/12 09:46 AM Re: THEIR FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT [Re: bluezone]
Teonan Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/30/12
Posts: 2771
Loc: Cayuga bioregion
SOLIDARITY WITH CTU!


Janitors plan one-day solidarity strike for teachers
In a show of solidarity, some janitors may be joining Chicago teachers on the picket lines.

September 12, 2012
By: Linda Lutton

In a show of solidarity, some janitors may be joining Chicago teachers on the picket lines.

Tom Balanoff, president of SEIU Local 1, says many of the 1,500 janitors who work in Chicago public schools have wanted to join striking teachers. Balanoff says he’s now filed a notice that could make that possible.

"On Friday, there very well may be Local 1 members—janitors—who will stand outside and support the teachers instead of go to work."

Balanoff was among more than a dozen union leaders, representing everyone from nurses to electricians to police, who voiced support for striking teachers yesterday. State and national teachers union officials were there as well, including Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, the parent union of the Chicago Teachers Union. They spoke outside Chicago Public Schools headquarters.

Robert Kelly is head of the CTA rail workers’ union.

"Although our teachers are not in the classroom today teaching, they stand here today teaching all of us what is right when they fight for what is right—what is theirs!"

The leaders said the labor movement had to fight to get free public education for every child, and now has to fight to protect it.
_________________________
"Everything that has ever happened to us is there to make us stronger."
-John Trudell

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