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#1344897 --- 05/17/12 02:21 AM Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/10/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Comptroller finds improprieties with another tutoring provider
by Philissa Cramer, at 4:24 pm
Holes in the Department of Education’s oversight of tutoring companies that work in city schools allowed one of the companies to collect payments without proving it had delivered services, according to an audit by Comptroller John Liu.

Liu found that Champion Learning Center collected about $860,000 in the 2009-2010 school year for tutoring students who had not signed into tutoring sessions or for tutoring sessions that officials had not certified had taken place.

The audit highlights the murky world of “supplemental educational services” providers, companies that offer tutoring mandated under the No Child Left Behind law. They are private entities but are subject to a host of city and state regulations, and the city must both monitor them and give them access to students.

The audit comes weeks after the U.S. Department of Justice filed suit against another SES provider, Princeton Review, for falsifying attendance records and bilking New York City out of millions of dollars. In that case, investigators found that the company had submitted false signatures showing that tutoring sessions had taken place.

Related Stories

Comptroller finds city underreported high school drop-outs March 29, 2011 9
Auditing DOE’s space planning data, comptroller finds glitches September 14, 2011 3
Suit: Princeton Review charged city for tutoring it didn’t provide May 1, 2012 6
Audit: City failed to give timely services to needy children June 18, 2009 1
Comptroller-DOE feud takes center stage at audit announcement July 22, 2009 10
Liu does not conclude that outright fraud took place at Champion Learning, which New York Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez revealed three years ago took home as much as $320 an hour for serving city students when overhead costs were included. Rather, Liu found that the group violated some regulations by delivering tutoring during school hours and played fast and loose with others — and that the city’s monitoring systems allowed for the possibility of fraud.

Liu wants the city to try to recoup the irregular payments to Champion Learning, and city officials said they would heed the suggestion.

“While the law requires that we offer contracts to all state-approved providers, they still have to comply with their contracts and applicable regulations,” said Marge Feinberg, a department spokeswoman, in a statement. “We will seek to recoup all payments for services that were not permitted or that could not be verified.”

Liu’s office has also referred the audit to the city’s Special Commission of Investigation for further scrutiny. SCI has previously detailed improprieties by other SES providers in the city.

Liu’s audit of Champion Education Partners is below.

http://gothamschools.org/2012/05/16/comptroller-finds-improprieties-with-another-tutoring-provider/
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Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1344942 --- 05/17/12 11:44 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: twocats]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12660
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: twocats
Comptroller finds improprieties with another tutoring provider
by Philissa Cramer, at 4:24 pm
Holes in the Department of Education’s oversight of tutoring companies that work in city schools allowed one of the companies to collect payments without proving it had delivered services, according to an audit by Comptroller John Liu.

Liu found that Champion Learning Center collected about $860,000 in the 2009-2010 school year for tutoring students who had not signed into tutoring sessions or for tutoring sessions that officials had not certified had taken place.

The audit highlights the murky world of “supplemental educational services” providers, companies that offer tutoring mandated under the No Child Left Behind law. They are private entities but are subject to a host of city and state regulations, and the city must both monitor them and give them access to students.

The audit comes weeks after the U.S. Department of Justice filed suit against another SES provider, Princeton Review, for falsifying attendance records and bilking New York City out of millions of dollars. In that case, investigators found that the company had submitted false signatures showing that tutoring sessions had taken place.

Related Stories

Comptroller finds city underreported high school drop-outs March 29, 2011 9
Auditing DOE’s space planning data, comptroller finds glitches September 14, 2011 3
Suit: Princeton Review charged city for tutoring it didn’t provide May 1, 2012 6
Audit: City failed to give timely services to needy children June 18, 2009 1
Comptroller-DOE feud takes center stage at audit announcement July 22, 2009 10
Liu does not conclude that outright fraud took place at Champion Learning, which New York Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez revealed three years ago took home as much as $320 an hour for serving city students when overhead costs were included. Rather, Liu found that the group violated some regulations by delivering tutoring during school hours and played fast and loose with others — and that the city’s monitoring systems allowed for the possibility of fraud.

Liu wants the city to try to recoup the irregular payments to Champion Learning, and city officials said they would heed the suggestion.

“While the law requires that we offer contracts to all state-approved providers, they still have to comply with their contracts and applicable regulations,” said Marge Feinberg, a department spokeswoman, in a statement. “We will seek to recoup all payments for services that were not permitted or that could not be verified.”

Liu’s office has also referred the audit to the city’s Special Commission of Investigation for further scrutiny. SCI has previously detailed improprieties by other SES providers in the city.

Liu’s audit of Champion Education Partners is below.

http://gothamschools.org/2012/05/16/comptroller-finds-improprieties-with-another-tutoring-provider/


Am I missing something? See red.

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#1345957 --- 05/22/12 10:46 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: twocats]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/10/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Dear SUNY board and SUNY Charter Institute:
I urge you to reject the application of Success Academy to open two charter schools in District 2 on the following grounds:
1. Attrition and push-out rates: This charter chain has a very high student and teacher attrition rate, as referenced in news articles and its NYS report cards [annual teacher attrition rates of 38%, 56%, 19%, 50% and 26%.] It also has a documented history of pushing out high-needs students. And yet the new charter law explicitly says that charter schools should demonstrate an effort to recruit and retain at –risk children. This is not a model which deserves replication elsewhere in the city.
2. Evidence of excessive compensation and proposed charter management fees: Ms. Moskowitz receives an annual salary in excess of $379,478, in addition to benefits worth more than $24,000, amounting to a total compensation package of $403,660, according to the latest available (2009) submission to the IRS by the Success Charter Network.
Governor Cuomo has inveighed against excessive salaries for district superintendents who receive far lower salaries, and has proposed capping superintendents’ salaries at $175,000 a year in districts with fewer than 10,000 students. According to the SUNY charter website, the Success chain of charters has fewer than 3,000 students.
The Governor has also created a task force to investigate excessive compensation levels at not-for-profits that receive taxpayer support from the state, and in January, he signed an executive order to limit spending for executive pay at state-funded service providers, including a $199,000 salary cap.
Since Success charter schools receive considerable state funds to provide educational services, a portion of which are then handed over to the CMO to pay for Ms. Moskowitz’s salary, it is not clear if her compensation violates this executive order.
In addition, Ms. Moskowitz has applied for an increase inher management fees to 15%. These fees are twice the average for a NYC CMO (7%) and close to the average of for-profit NYC EMOs (17%). New charters run by EMOS are now banned by law, as I’m sure you are aware. Her excessive compensation and proposed hike in fees reveals a lack of fiscal prudence with taxpayer funds, and she should not be rewarded with permission to expand her network until these other matters are fully resolved.
3. Overwhelming parent and community opposition: At District 2 hearings about this application, scores of local parents and community members spoke out and have signed petitions opposing these applications. To my knowledge, not a single elected official representing the district supports these proposals and many have submitted comments against them. The Community Education Council in District 2 passed a resolution in opposition to these applications, as well as Manhattan Community Boards 5,6, and 8.
The new charter law was written expressly so that authorizers would have to take community input into consideration when making a decision. According to SUNY Charter Institute’s own RFP Guidance Handbook:
“SUNY’s proposal review process must generally ‘consider the demand for charter schools by the community,’ per Education Law § 2852(9-a)(b)…applicants will also be required to show evidence of community interest in and support for the school.”
Approving this charter would appear to violate the intent of the law.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1345976 --- 05/22/12 11:40 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: twocats]
Offline

Senior Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 7644
Nothing should be privatized. Everything needs and should be state run.

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#1345984 --- 05/22/12 11:53 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: ]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/10/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
The biggest problem I see is that it's being 'privatized' with tax dollars.
_________________________
Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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#1346047 --- 05/23/12 08:07 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: ]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
Originally Posted By: Chicago Jesus
Nothing should be privatized. Everything needs and should be state run.


The better to indoctrinate good little state worshipers, as this bureaucrat is trying to do:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjpWaESn_9g
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1346060 --- 05/23/12 11:27 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: VM Smith]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12660
Loc: NY
There is no need to privatize education. The simple solution is for the state to give out its money based on the children in that school. Just like most other countries.

If Tommy goes to public school A the state gives the school the amount of money that they decide is the amount needed to educate Tommy, let's say $10,000. If Tommy's parents decide that Tommy is a genius in math and Public school B has a better Math program they take Tommy out of Public School A and put him in Public school B. The State then takes the money and stops sending it to Public school A and sends it to Public school B. Or let’s say that Private Catholic school X has the best math program Tommy's parents can find so they take Tommy out of Public school B and send him to Catholic school X. The state then stops sending money to Public school B and starts to send it to Catholic school X.

There is now competition in public education, problem solved. Will it happen? No. The teachers unions will never allow it to go through and will spend billions to buy politicians so that it will not happen.

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#1346063 --- 05/23/12 11:37 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: cwjga]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
Quote:
There is now competition in public education, problem solved.


Not solved. There is still a state, and the state is still involved with education, as in the vid I posted, where the government bureaucrat is screaming that the kids must not disrespect the head of government.
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1346080 --- 05/23/12 01:06 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: twocats]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 35815
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: twocats
2. Evidence of excessive compensation


look in the mirror for over compensation without performace
time to bring in sylvan learning to teach the kids...

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#1346183 --- 05/24/12 03:18 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: bluezone]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
Another good example of why it should be privatized. Why should anyone have to pay school taxes to support idiocy like this?:


(NaturalNews) A former student at Perryton High School in Perryton, Texas, has filed a lawsuit against the school's district for injuries he allegedly suffered during a teacher-mandated reenactment of the Holocaust. According to the suit, Andrew Yara, now 19, suffered a partially dislocated hip, dehydration, and a series of seizures after being forced to carry around several heavy student on his back as part of the bizarre education experiment.

For a number of years now, Perryton High School has observed a two-day remembrance of the Holocaust known as "Red Ribbon Day," during which time students taking a world history class are taught the grim details of this sobering scourge on human history. But part of this educational experience includes dividing students up into groups of "Nazis" and "Jews," and forcing the "Jews" to withstand numerous forms of abuse from the "Nazis."

"(The Jews) must do everything school faculty or other students tell them to, including picking up other students' trash, being taken outside and sprayed with water hoses, bear-crawling across the hot track, carrying other students' books, and even carrying other students," says the complaint. "[A]ny student who did not do everything they were told were [sic] receive a failing grade.

Yara, who was one of the "Jews" forced to wear a red ribbon, subsequently became injured after a student who allegedly weighed nearly double Yara's own weight jumped on Yara's back and asked Yara to carry him around in between a class period. Yara says he was forced to carry three different students around during this passing period, and at one point had two students jump on his back at the same time.

When the second student jumped on Yara's back, Yara allegedly fell backwards and sustained numerous injuries to his body that sent "shocking, burning" pain down both of his legs from his pelvis. Yara says he suffered continued pain throughout the day in his lower back and legs, and later had to undergo expensive medical treatment. He also later passed out at work and had to be rushed to the emergency room.

Yara and his parents say the school showed "deliberate indifference" to Yara's constitutional rights throughout "Red Ribbon Week," and they are seeking damages for violations of Yara's right to bodily integrity under the due process clause of the 14th Amendment. They also cited Yara's right to be free from excessive force under the Fourth Amendment as part of the suit, which is also asking the school district to cover the costs associated with Yara's medical bills.

You can read the full details of the lawsuit here:
http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/05/17/redribbon.pdf

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035953_high_school_Nazi_prisoners.html#ixzz1vklzg5xR
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1346191 --- 05/24/12 03:47 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: VM Smith]
Rascal Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 06/05/00
Posts: 17022
Loc: Brewerton, NY, USA
They shouldn't just be allowed to sue the school district, but also the teacher union, and the teacher himself.

The teachers should all have their own malpractice insurance paid for by themselves.

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#1346318 --- 05/24/12 08:04 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: twocats]
bluezone Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 12/19/04
Posts: 35815
Loc: USA
a rochester school is going to have 12 hour days and 11 months for the school year

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#1346404 --- 05/25/12 08:16 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: bluezone]
mimi33 Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 01/30/02
Posts: 526
Loc: seneca falls, ny, usa
I have to agree with cwiga here if its really public education, than it should be equal across the board...x amount to dollars per student. And although you, twocats, seem to be a dedicated teacher, there are too many teachers these days who aare obviously not. Too many who are tenured after only three years, who throw their kids to the wolves because they just don't have to work anymore. And to deny that is to agree to lie about anything that is wrong with the current system.

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#1346432 --- 05/25/12 11:53 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: mimi33]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12660
Loc: NY
Why Charter Schools Are the True 'Purple' Solution to Public Education


By Lanny Davis

Published October 20, 2011

FoxNews.com




In the 1960s, the late New York Sen. Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (D) used conservative, market-based, competitive forces to renew and create new jobs in the inner-city wasteland of the minority neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn. A cynical New York City reporter (a redundant expression) was heard to mutter, as he heard Kennedy’s pro-market, pro-business ideas to help the poor, “You sound like Barry Goldwater.” Legend has it that Kennedy responded: “Maybe, but I know that I mean it.”

Today we have a concept called “a charter school,” which uses private market forces and competition to improve our public school system — by breaking the traditional monopoly franchise of the public school district, run by local boards of education.

A charter school, despite misunderstanding by many people, is a public school and is part of the public school system. It has also been mischaracterized as a private school, or as a door-opener for public-funded vouchers to pay for private schools. That is wrong. But it is a school under contract — with one party a public entity — such as the board of education or the school system superintendent — and the other party a private party, whether a for-profit company, parents or teachers.

The deal is this: The contract, or “charter,” allows the outside entity to operate the school free of the uniform rules applying to curriculum, teaching salaries, hiring and firing and other operating details that are applicable to all public schools; but in return, the charter school must deliver on pre-agreed goals, such as performance measured by standard tests or graduation rates.

What does this achieve? A lot. First and foremost, it busts monopoly power, where one organization, such as the school district, has a captive group of customers, i.e., public school students, who have no choice but to be subject to the monopoly. And it provides the benefit of competition — students have choices, and if the charter school doesn’t work, they (i.e., their parents) can vote with their feet. And perhaps more importantly, the public school system is no longer a monopoly — they must do better or they will lose more students to charter schools within the public school system.

Success stories of the charter school movement can be found across the nation. In Detroit, with one of the highest dropout rates in the country, a charter school called University Prep Academy was founded in 1998 by the visionary Doug Ross, a former Labor Department official. He received supplementary private funding, and promised to meet the goal of 90 percent graduation and 90 percent going further to some type of higher education. And he met those goals, using creative teaching, curriculum and personalized techniques.

For example, parents at Prep Academy must attend “Learned Team Meetings” with their children three times each year. The academy develops curriculum “one student at a time,” allowing students and teachers to develop their own learning plan, updated at the end of each marking period. Up to eighth grade, instead of grades, the school evaluates students with a combination of learning checklists, rating scales and narrative comments.

Another success story is a charter school in Chicago, called the Youth Connections Charter School (YCCS) at Malcolm X Community. The contracting party is a for-profit company called K12, run by another educational visionary, Ron Packard. But the school itself is run by a nonprofit board, which includes representatives of public entities and community leaders. YCCS in itself deserves a separate column and study: It serves only kids out of the school system for at least a year — whether dropouts, in jail, or girls who have had babies. The results — using a hybrid of online, supervised education or in-school teaching — are nothing short of miraculous. Graduation rates at YCCS have also exceeded 90 percent.

So charter schools are the latest example of the benefits of challenging government monopolies, with the resulting benefits of competition, private investments and innovation. This lesson is just as true in order to achieve such liberal goals as creating jobs and enrolling lower-income people in affordable health care as it applies to public school education.

Lanny Davis is the principal in the Washington D.C. law firm of Lanny J. Davis & Associates, which specializes in strategic crisis management. He is a Fox News contributor. Davis served as President Clinton’s Special Counsel in 1996-98 and as a member of President Bush’s Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board in 2006-07. He is the author of “Scandal: How ‘Gotcha’ Politics Is Destroying America” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). He can be found on Facebook and Twitter (@LannyDavis). His column appears Thursdays on FoxNews.com, The Hill, the Daily Caller, Newsmax.com, the Huffington Post and the Jakarta Globe.

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#1346540 --- 05/25/12 09:38 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: cwjga]
Ayuveda Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 04/05/10
Posts: 6367
Loc: Imagine
Originally Posted By: cwjga

Why Charter Schools Are the True 'Purple' Solution to Public Education




Plan on testing those privatized waters once your term of office is over presidente Trierarch?

Good riddence. I'm sure you'd float to the top.





Fight to save Philadelphia schools
By Betsey Piette
Philadelphia
Published May 2, 2012




Philadelphia students protest school
closings and cuts in staff.
photo: Joseph Piette



The wholesale privatization of Philadelphia public schools is underway. A broad-based movement will be needed to stop it.

A decade ago, protests by students and parents temporarily blocked the massive privatization of Philadelphia’s schools by the for-profit education management corporation, Edison Schools — now EdisonLearning Inc. Once again, an attempt is now being made to turn over control of education in the fifth-largest U.S. city to a handful of for-profit corporations.

This January, the unelected Philadelphia School Reform Commission, after announcing that the district was “on the brink of financial disaster,” appointed former Philadelphia Gas Co. CEO, Thomas Knudsen, as district “recovery” officer.

Knudsen will be paid $150,000 for six months’ work. His first “cost-cutting” measure was to award a “short-term” $6 million contract to The Boston Group to implement $61 million in budget cuts over the next six months. He is calling for more than half a billion dollars in cuts by 2017.

Knudsen’s recommendations are to close 40 “low-performing, underutilized” schools in 2013 and 24 more by 2017. The remaining 185 schools in the district would be broken up into “achievement networks” of about 25 schools each, to be run by private companies who bid for management contracts. The number of charter schools, now handling about 25 percent of the city’s roughly 200,000 students, would increase to accommodate 40 percent.

Washington Post blogger Karen Strauss described Knudsen’s proposal as a “desperate Hail Mary pass with no more chance of succeeding than previous efforts.” (April 28)

The plan is also clearly an attack on school workers and their unions. The central school district office staff, already only half of what it was last year, would be further reduced from 600 to 250 workers. Cuts in wages and benefits would total $156 million.

More than 2,500 blue-collar union jobs will be outsourced, forcing workers to give up wages and benefits. Knudsen calls for the “renegotiation” or even “abrogation” of existing school employee union contracts.

Philadelphia Federation of Teachers President Jerry T. Jordan described Knudsen’s proposal as “a cynical, right-wing and market-driven plan to privatize public education, to force thousands of economically disadvantaged families to select from an under-funded hodge-podge of EMO [education management organizations] and charter company-run schools and to convert thousands of professional and family-sustaining positions into low-paying, high-turnover jobs.” (TheNotebook.org, April 24)

Disaster capitalism

The 2011-12 Reform Commission budget made draconian cuts in Philadelphia’s already underfunded schools. Knudsen’s plan for 2013-17 promises even more. It contains no provisions for smaller classrooms, art and music, school libraries, full-time nurses or adequate security. And the promise of better education through charter schools has proven illusory.

Helen Gym, a mother of three, told Knudsen, “You’re not speaking for me.” Gym, a community organizer active in addressing conflicts between Asian and African-American students at a South Philadelphia high school, described the Knudsen Plan as “disaster capitalism that tries to shock a besieged public with unproven, untested, and drastic action couched as ‘solutions’.”

Gym challenged Knudsen’s use of terms like “achievement networks” and “rightsizing” schools when there is no plan to reduce class sizes or increase support personnel, noting that “seat expansion” just means “larger class sizes without extra funds.” Gym went on to criticize the plan to “expand charter populations willy-nilly despite a national study showing two-thirds of Philadelphia charters are no better or worse than district-managed schools.” (TheNotebook.org, April 24)

It’s not just in Philadelphia. A new University of Texas study found African-American high school students in Texas are three times more likely to drop out from a charter system than from a regular public school. The rate for students who leave school because of transfers to another state, homeschooling or by being expelled was 5 percent for large urban school districts but 15 percent for charters. In districts with less than 100 African-American students, the numbers were even worse: 22 percent dropped out and 18 percent left. The study compared districts in Austin, Houston and Dallas from 1998 to 2008. (Austin Chronicle, April 27)

Without jobs to offer, who needs educated students?

There is no lack of money that could be used for education. Last year’s state budget for Pennsylvania slashed nearly $1 billion in public education funding yet approved spending $600 million to construct new prisons. The state’s total spending for prisons is over $2.1 billion. The state’s annual education subsidy for Philadelphia averages $6,953 per student, while it spends more than $32,000 to incarcerate each prisoner.

Taxpayers in Philadelphia will pay $476.2 million in 2012 alone for the cost of U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, enough to finance the salaries of 7,029 elementary teachers for a year.

There has been plenty of money to bail out the banks and lending institutions. If you add up what the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank spent to bail out banks here and in Europe and Japan, the total poured into the world capitalist financial system was close to $20 trillion. That’s $20,000,000,000,000.

In the book, “Capitalism at a Dead End,” Fred Goldstein notes: “The system of capitalism is facing a crisis unlike any it’s experienced before. This is not simply a cyclical problem of overproduction that will go away in a few years, but a systemic problem aggravated by over 30 years of globalization and growing global unemployment.”

Youth have been hit the hardest. At the end of 2009, globally there were 81 million unemployed youth ages 15 to 24. In the U.S., official youth unemployment is 20 percent, but in most urban areas it’s 50 percent or higher.

The new generation of workers coming into the workforce is largely shut out, whether or not these workers have obtained higher degrees of education. With capitalism needing fewer workers to produce more and more goods and services in less and less time, the need for an educated workforce diminishes.

A new report by the Associated Press found that more than 53.6 percent of the people under 25 having a bachelor’s degree were either out of work or doing jobs that need only a high school diploma or less. (FightBack!News, April 28)

High tech has driven down the level of skills required for many jobs in modern industry today. Most jobs under 21st-century capitalism are low or medium level and require little or no formal education above middle or high school. Rather than having our tax money spent to educate workers they don’t need, the corporations and banks push to lower their own measly taxes and pressure politicians to spend public funds on bailing out the banks.

Capitalism is proving bankrupt when it comes to providing for human needs and social services, including education. A fightback movement is certain to develop in response to the Knudsen Plan. As devastating as these proposed cuts to Philadelphia’s schools could be, it would be a mistake to limit our demands to school reform issues.

To be successful, this struggle must also be a fight for jobs, union wages and benefits, and for an end to the school-to-prison pipeline. And to have lasting success, the fight must be against the greedy, rotten, capitalist system that puts profits before all else.


http://www.workers.org/2012/us/philadelphia_schools_0510/

_________________________
Sometimes, tear gas can make you see better.
-graffiti in Athens


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#1346569 --- 05/26/12 01:12 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: Ayuveda]
Offline

Senior Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 7644

You deserve this comrade!



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#1346572 --- 05/26/12 01:39 AM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: ]
Ayuveda Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 04/05/10
Posts: 6367
Loc: Imagine
Originally Posted By: Chicago Jesus

You deserve this comrade!

_________________________
Sometimes, tear gas can make you see better.
-graffiti in Athens


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#1346645 --- 05/26/12 07:34 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: Ayuveda]
kyle585 Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 02/18/09
Posts: 19801
Loc: Somewhere out there
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47577163/ns/technology_and_science-science/#.T8Esp8VXm70

Richard Leakey predicts skepticism over evolution will soon be history.

Not that the avowed atheist has any doubts himself.

Sometime in the next 15 to 30 years, the Kenyan-born paleoanthropologist expects scientific discoveries will have accelerated to the point that "even the skeptics can accept it."

"If you get to the stage where you can persuade people on the evidence, that it's solid, that we are all African, that color is superficial, that stages of development of culture are all interactive," Leakey says, "then I think we have a chance of a world that will respond better to global challenges."

Leakey, a professor at Stony Brook University on Long Island, recently spent several weeks in New York promoting the Turkana Basin Institute in Kenya. The institute, where Leakey spends most of his time, welcomes researchers and scientists from around the world dedicated to unearthing the origins of mankind in an area rich with fossils.

His friend, Paul Simon, performed at a May 2 fundraiser for the institute in Manhattan that collected more than $2 million. A National Geographic documentary on his work at Turkana aired this month on public television.

Now 67, Leakey is the son of the late Louis and Mary Leakey and conducts research with his wife, Meave, and daughter, Louise. The family claims to have unearthed "much of the existing fossil evidence for human evolution."

On the eve of his return to Africa earlier this week, Leakey spoke to The Associated Press in New York City about the past and the future.

"If you look back, the thing that strikes you, if you've got any sensitivity, is that extinction is the most common phenomena," Leakey says. "Extinction is always driven by environmental change. Environmental change is always driven by climate change. Man accelerated, if not created, planet change phenomena; I think we have to recognize that the future is by no means a very rosy one."

Any hope for mankind's future, he insists, rests on accepting existing scientific evidence of its past.

"If we're spreading out across the world from centers like Europe and America that evolution is nonsense and science is nonsense, how do you combat new pathogens, how do you combat new strains of disease that are evolving in the environment?" he asked.

"If you don't like the word evolution, I don't care what you call it, but life has changed. You can lay out all the fossils that have been collected and establish lineages that even a fool could work up. So the question is why, how does this happen? It's not covered by Genesis. There's no explanation for this change going back 500 million years in any book I've read from the lips of any God."

Leakey insists he has no animosity toward religion.

"If you tell me, well, people really need a faith ... I understand that," he said.

"I see no reason why you shouldn't go through your life thinking if you're a good citizen, you'll get a better future in the afterlife ...."
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**** ATTENTION! BAD POLITICIANS ARE ELECTED BY GOOD PEOPLE WHO DON'T VOTE! ****

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#1346655 --- 05/26/12 09:10 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: kyle585]
cwjga Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 11/06/08
Posts: 12660
Loc: NY
Emanuel Interview Irks Teachers Union





An interview with Mayor Rahm Emanuel is featured in a new video from a Michigan-based education organization promoting charter schools and criticizing the Chicago Teachers Union.

by HUNTER CLAUSS | Jan 31, 2012


As Chicago Public Schools begins what are certain to be contentious contract talks with the Chicago Teachers Union, Mayor Rahm Emanuel emerged as the star of a new online video promoting charter schools and ripping the union.

An exclusive interview with Emanuel highlights the 35-minute video produced by the Michigan-based Education Action Group Foundation and Fox News political analyst Juan Williams. Williams narrates the video, saying the teachers union is “radically politicized” and is “repeatedly providing terrible examples for Chicago’s school children.” (Scroll down to see the video)

A spokeswoman for Emanuel said Monday the mayor did not share those views of the union, but CTU officials were irked by Emanuel’s more-measured comments in an interview with Williams. The mayor discusses the opposition he faced from the CTU to some of his education proposals, such as extending the length of the school day this year.

“Do I think the union leadership has been a problem in resisting? Absolutely,” Emanuel tells Williams. Emanuel also says: “I think the system was never designed to benefit the kids.” And he lauds teachers at the Noble Street charter network’s schools as being “on a mission” and “not just doing a job.”

CTU spokeswoman Stephanie Gadlin described the mayor’s collaboration with the Education Action Group Foundation as odd. “Their new video is little more than right-wing propaganda that contributes nothing to the education debate in our city,” she said.

Kyle Olson, the founder and CEO of the Education Action Group Foundation, said he decided to focus the video on Emanuel’s education agenda, including his support for charter schools, partly because of the vocal opposition those efforts elicited from the union. The video’s title, “A Tale of Two Missions,” is a reference to the contrasting visions of the mayor and union officials, Olson said.

The video’s release last week came as Emanuel’s administration began negotiations with the union for a new four-year contract. Olson said the timing was not meant to coincide with the labor talks, but he hoped it would have an impact on public perception of the negotiations.

“You have got a mayor who wants to reform the school system and the teachers union is fighting him virtually every step of the way,” Olson told the Chicago News Cooperative on Monday. “Chicago Public Schools needs to be reformed, and the way you do that is through the contract.”

The interview with Emanuel was conducted in October, after Olson and Williams issued a request to the mayor’s office over the summer.

Tarrah Cooper, a spokeswoman for Emanuel, said the mayor agreed to the interview because the Education Action Group Foundation wanted to highlight school options in the city.

“He and Juan discussed the reforms within the Chicago Public Schools system to ensure that every child in every neighborhood has access to a world-class education to prepare them for college and career,” Cooper said in an email.

In the video, Williams refers to Emanuel’s decision to enroll his children in private school. “Those who are lucky enough to send their children to private schools, do,” Williams says. “Even the mayor has his children in private schools.”

The film also features clips of CTU President Karen Lewis giving a speech last year mocking U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s lisp and talking about her drug use during college. The footage of Lewis’ speech became public when the Education Action Group Foundation sent an edited version to media outlets in November. Lewis later apologized for her comments but criticized Olson as a “neoconservative, anti-labor and anti-public education blogger.”

Williams describes teachers unions in general as “beneficiaries of the failed status quo” who “obstruct and resist education reform whenever and however it is tried.” He touts charter schools, whose teachers largely are not unionized, as a “Chicago miracle” and a solution to poorly performing public schools, although state achievement test data released last year showed charters schools performed nearly the same as neighborhood schools.

Emanuel has been a firm supporter of charters, which receive taxpayer money but are privately operated. In last year’s mayoral election, Emanuel’s campaign co-chairman was Juan Rangel, who oversees one of the city’s largest charter school networks. Emanuel also has pushed for Chicago Public Schools to adopt policies used by charter operators, such as home visits by teachers, stiffer teacher performance standards and providing merit pay for teachers.

The Education Action Group Foundation is not the only out-of-state organization hoping to influence the contract talks in Chicago.

Mary Anderson, the executive director of Oregon-based Stand for Children’s Illinois office, said she was planning events such as telephone “town hall meetings” so parents can ask questions about the negotiations. “We want to make sure parents have a say in what’s happening,” she said.

In 2010, Stand For Children created a political committee that made donations to state lawmakers, and it was a driving force in winning approval for legislation that will extend the school day in Chicago next school year and make it harder for teachers to go on strike.

To counter such efforts, the CTU has hired veteran political consultant Delmarie Cobb, whose clients include Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown and City Council members Leslie Hairston (5th Ward) and Anthony Beale (9th).

Gadlin, the CTU spokeswoman, said union leaders hoped Cobb would help beef up the labor group’s public-relations efforts because they felt “outgunned” last year by Emanuel’s aggressive push for longer school hours.

“They’re very good, as you’ve seen with Kyle Olson,” she said.

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#1346750 --- 05/27/12 03:36 PM Re: Yeahhh...Let's Privatize It [Re: mimi33]
twocats Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 02/10/10
Posts: 11904
Loc: NYS
Originally Posted By: mimi33
I have to agree with cwiga here if its really public education, than it should be equal across the board...x amount to dollars per student. And although you, twocats, seem to be a dedicated teacher, there are too many teachers these days who aare obviously not. Too many who are tenured after only three years, who throw their kids to the wolves because they just don't have to work anymore. And to deny that is to agree to lie about anything that is wrong with the current system.

I also agree that all students and schools should be funded more equitably. However, let's say that one school has 10% non-English speakers. The state requires 2 teachers for those students, not just one classroom teacher. In that case, non-English speaking students cost more so they should 'carry more money with them' wherever they go. The same goes for special ed. students.

As for teachers who don't grow with the times, they are out there. I am totally in favor of renewable contracts, but my fear is that many schools will base employment decisions entirely on cost instead of who may be the best teacher.
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Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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