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#1070572 --- 08/29/09 01:45 PM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: *Sparkey*]
sassyone Offline
Silver Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 11439
Loc: Seneca Falls,NY,
So do I, school is starting soon. Thanks.

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#1070592 --- 08/29/09 02:32 PM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: AnneSmile]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
"Hopefully it was just a precaution until they verified it wasn't the Swine Flu."

It doesn't have to be Swine Flu. On average, 100,000 people in the US are hospitalized every year with flu, and 20,000 die. A further 44,000 die of pneumonia.
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1071960 --- 09/02/09 03:31 AM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: VM Smith]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
Yes I realize that. That comment was in my thinking that hospitals are being overly precautions for good reason, he was in contact with others who actually did have the swine flu, helps to prevent the spread even further.
_________________________
One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1071961 --- 09/02/09 03:47 AM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: AnneSmile]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
Advice to parents on H1N1

* Story Highlights
* Dr. Sanjay Gupta shares parents' concerns about facing H1N1 flu
* Remember: Most children will have a few miserable days, then be fine
* Don't take your child to the doctor's office without calling first
* Today, H1N1 is causing mild to moderate illness, not widespread deaths


http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/09/01/parents.h1n1.flu.guide.gupta/index.html?eref=rss_topstories

# Story Highlights
# Dr. Sanjay Gupta shares parents' concerns about facing H1N1 flu
# Remember: Most children will have a few miserable days, then be fine
# Don't take your child to the doctor's office without calling first
# Today, H1N1 is causing mild to moderate illness, not widespread deaths

(CNN) -- Over this past week, I had some interesting conversations with colleagues who are also health care professionals. These conversations usually start with, "You know what I hate about the media ... ?"

Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks to Dr. Jim Fortenberry, pediatrician in chief at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

Now, over the past eight years, I have grown accustomed to being engaged in these sort of discussions where I am asked about everything the "media" have reported over the past few months, and asked to defend things point by point. It can be a challenging task.

This time, however, the topic was H1N1, or swine flu.

I spent the weekend thinking about what I was being told, and realized there was a larger point here.

People were scared, more than I had seen in a long time. And, health care professionals were blaming the media -- accusing them of being alarmist.

So, I decided to get away from the studio, away from the talking heads discussing mortality rates, and away from the hypothetical discussions about what might or might not happen. I wanted to see for myself what was happening in emergency rooms right now.

I was most curious about pediatric ERs, because young people seem to be most affected by this, and selfishly, I was curious about my own three girls and how I should react if they become ill this fall.

In short, I wanted to create a parents' guide to dealing with the swine flu that is based on the best science and my interviews with experts all over the country. In Depth: H1N1 flu
Don't Miss

First off, there is no question that pediatric emergency rooms are much busier than this time last year -- about two to three times busier at the ER I visited.

Many of the patients sitting in the waiting room were there with flu-like symptoms, worried about H1N1.

The doctor who met me started by saying he was giving the media a C+ in its overall coverage of H1N1, and blamed his busy ER, in part, on the media for stoking fears.

"Fair enough," I answered back, "but, how do I get to an A?" In order to get there, I wanted to report clear, concise answers about what a parent should do with a sick child. So, here we go.

Point 1. As things stand now, the vast majority of children who develop flu-like symptoms this fall will have a few miserable days, and nothing more. And those days are best spent at home -- not in the ER or a doctor's office.

Point 2. If you are worried, you should call your pediatrician's office first. Don't take your child in without calling. Two reasons: Your child may not have H1N1, but could become exposed by being around sick children. And, after several hours of waiting, you are still likely to be told the basics -- plenty of fluids, rest and dose-appropriate acetaminophen for a fever. After all, it is still the flu we are talking about. Video Dr. Gupta talks preparedness with HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius »

Point 3. One doctor told me a way to think about things that was helpful. He said "remove the term H1N1 from the equation." If your child had regular flu, would you take him to the hospital? If the answer is no, then don't take him/her to the hospital now.

Point 4. Yes, hearing between 30,000 and 90,000 could die from H1N1 is scary, but keep in mind -- around 40,000 people die from the regular or seasonal flu every year. The numbers may not be that much different, yet there is not panic about the regular flu. As things look now, H1N1 is causing only mild to moderate illness, not the widespread deaths people are worried about.

Point 4. There are some children who should be seen by their doctor. Call your doctor if:

• A baby younger than 12 weeks has a fever greater than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit

• A child, older than 12 weeks has a fever for three days

• A child's fever returns after a 12-24 hour time period

• A child is not passing urine or making tears for more than six hours
Health Library

* MayoClinic.com: H1N1 flu

• A child does not smile or show interest in playing for several hours

Dial 911 if:

• A child cannot speak while trying to breathe

• Has a blue or dark purple color to the nail beds, lips or gums

• Is not responding to you because he is too tired or weak
advertisement

One point that was reinforced to me over and over again by the pediatricians is the best place for a sick child is at home. And, with regard to school -- after 24 fever-free hours without the aid of medications, he or she can go back.

This is the advice that my wife and I will be following this fall for our own children. Hope it is helpful to you, and the media can score an "A," at least this time around.
_________________________
One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1073568 --- 09/06/09 07:21 PM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: AnneSmile]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
"he was in contact with others who actually did have the swine flu, helps to prevent the spread even further."

My point was that isolation also helps to prevent the spread of other types of flu, which are just as dangerous.
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1073646 --- 09/07/09 02:40 AM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: VM Smith]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
I do realize that, I was hoping to discuss people's fears of swine flu, not regular flu which you seem to keep bringing back up. I understand why you do, I think, because swine fear may be overblown and most people will probably end up being diagnosed with regular flu vs swine flu; still the numbers bother me, from 40k - 90k is a big leap regardless of what type of flu it is.

As I said before, I wasn't paying much attention to the news reports because I felt, and still do, they were blowing it out of proportion. Now that my place of employment has had someone come to work with it, and 2 others since then, it concerns me more. It seems my friends are either afraid to talk about or are just thinking it won't happen to them. Either way I'm worried, call me paranoid chick in Florida ;\)
_________________________
One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1073666 --- 09/07/09 04:11 AM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: AnneSmile]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
I think it's serious, but no more so so than other flu types; it's just flu, really. It has shown no signs of having mutated into a more virulent form, and the 40-90,000 deaths is just one guess at the worst-case scenario. More people might contract it, due to the populace having no built-up immunity to it, but the symptoms don't appear to be worse that for other flu strains.

LOL, here are some other things to be paranoid about:

(Data are for the U.S.)


Number of deaths for leading causes of death

* Heart disease: 631,636
* Cancer: 559,888
* Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 137,119
* Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 124,583
* Accidents (unintentional injuries): 121,599
* Diabetes: 72,449
* Alzheimer's disease: 72,432
* Influenza and Pneumonia: 56,326
* Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis: 45,344
* Septicemia: 34,234


TMCnews
[September 06, 2009]

OPINION: Take common sense for flu
Sep 06, 2009 (The Augusta Chronicle - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- This year probably will go down in history not as the year of the swine flu pandemic, but as the year of swine flu pandemic hysteria.

Despite the national media's best efforts, the folks in the business of studying and treating diseases continue to insist that the H1N1 strain of flu is no worse than the garden-variety flu.

It seems the only significant difference is that it has a name. What did we call the flu before all this? That's right -- "the flu." And already the biggest effort regarding this strain seems to have been expended on attempting to persuade everyone to quit calling it "swine flu" and instead call it "H1N1," which isn't nearly as fun.

In fact, it was so fun in Egypt that several months ago the geniuses there rounded up most of the pigs in the country and killed them, even though the virus typically won't transmit from pigs to people. Maybe we could talk the CDC into changing the name to the "lobster flu," and force down the price of tasty crustaceans.

In any event, Columbia County's school system wasn't alone recently when they felt forced to send out a letter to parents saying, in effect, "Calm down." School Superindendent Charles Nagle said they decided to send the letter after answering dozens of "What are you going to do about it?!?" calls, as if the first and last line of defense against the resurgence of the Black Plague is a public school system armed with hand sanitizer.

Accustomed as they are to getting such alarmist calls -- I mean, parents melt the phone lines at the first sighting of a snowflake -- I'm sure it's not diplomatically possible to tell those moms (and dads, but mostly moms) to switch off the screaming talk shows and instead use a little common sense.

The letter, which also is posted on the school system Web site, does that. In a nice way, of course. "Please be aware that the symptoms of swine flu are similar to those of regular seasonal flu," it says. "As with seasonal flu, most people who get swine flu recover at home in approximately one week." The letter goes on to provide exactly the same instructions we get for battling any similar communicable illness, mainly revolving around this advice: "Keep your dang kids at home if they get sick, you idiot, and don't infect the rest of us." Oops. The letter didn't say that. Not in those words, anyway. But you get the point.

Anyway, the best defense against swine flu also happens to work perfectly against swine flu hysteria: Common sense. Take a dose and it'll all look better in the morning.
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1073675 --- 09/07/09 06:39 AM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: VM Smith]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
I'm not a hypochondriac but I do worry about those as well \:\/

* Heart disease: 631,636 - I might have a heart attack from someone actually washing their hands let alone doing their work that they were hired to do w/out complaining.
* Cancer: 559,888 - The noxious fumes of my neighbors perfume over time might cause some sort of cancer
* Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 137,119 - Work causes my blood pressure to rise, so again I can blame my co-workers
* Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 124,583 - So many germs so little cleaning done
* Accidents (unintentional injuries): 121,599 - I could fall off my chair at work, old and wobbly, and hit my head on the corner of my desk and die from a hematoma
* Diabetes: 72,449 - Darn co-worker bought her delicious Fudge Brownies again, she's trying to kill me
* Alzheimer's disease: 72,432 - What year is it again?
* Influenza and Pneumonia: 56,326 - If people would only wash their hands and cover their mouths and nose when they cough and sneeze, then perhaps it wouldn't be so widespread. Alas, most people are pigs. HA! Hence H1N1 aka Swine Flu
* Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis: 45,344 - caused from all the drugs I had to take to protect/cure myself from all the other diseases out there.
* Septicemia: 34,234 - My death won't be classified as death by flu, it will be death by Speticemia so again, I still can blame my co-workers

Hopefully you know I'm being a smart aleck ;\)

I know I asked for your opinions and if you would worry or not, I get a yes but no more so than usual. Thank you \:\) So now I want to know; how do you deal with co-workers not practicing proper hygiene and their coming to work when sick with no regards to their co-workers? I know times are hard and most people have used up their vacation/sick by now, my place of employment does not allow vacation/sick pay from November through December so most people have used up their time off, it's use it or loose it. So when one does get sick they can't afford to call out. I understand money talks but why risk getting others sick?


Edited by AnneSmile (09/07/09 06:47 AM)
_________________________
One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1073701 --- 09/07/09 09:35 AM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: AnneSmile]
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
If available I am getting the flu shot at my next Dr. visit this week...... Considering I will be taking care of all the people who THINK they have swine flu, and some that do have it.... I need to be extra careful, because the major medication I am on suppresses my immune system which makes it easier for me to catch it and harder to get rid of
_________________________
No Mullet...NO Glory!!

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#1073804 --- 09/07/09 01:27 PM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: Scottie2Hottie]
Strawberry Jam Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 07/11/04
Posts: 34421
Loc: Herkimer County NY
The worse thing anyone can do is panic. Not you, Scottie, you are right in your line of thinking. I will get the shot if I am deemed ok with the pregnancy to get it. As a nurse, I too am at higher risk and with the pregnancy, in the case of H1N1, even higher. But people not at higher risk need not be so panicked by the swine flu.

Every year at this time we discuss the flu. The same "rules" apply this year. Number one and most important: WASH YOUR HANDS OFTEN! It is the number one defense against ANY disease. Also, cover your mouth and nose if you sneeze or cough. Make sure to drink plenty of fluids, and even take Vit C along with your multi-vitamin.

If you do get symptoms, do NOT rush off to the ER and clog them. Wait 24 hours, if you develop a high fever call your physician. If you go, tell them you think you have the flu (of ANY kind). They will give you a mask...wear it and possibly help stop the spread of the flu.

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#1073807 --- 09/07/09 01:36 PM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: Strawberry Jam]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
I'm not in a panic and I usually get the pneumonia shot and all that the Dr. recommends based on my past history and current immune issues. My question is this:

Quote:
How do you deal with co-workers not practicing proper hygiene and their coming to work when sick with no regards to their co-workers? I know times are hard and most people have used up their vacation/sick by now, my place of employment does not allow vacation/sick pay from November through December so most people have used up their time off, it's use it or loose it. So when one does get sick they can't afford to call out. I understand money talks but why risk getting others sick?


I'm thinking Clorox wipes can only do so much in a call center environment, which I blame for my Double Pneumonia a few years ago, I just don't want to go through all that again.

That and I thought this would be a good topic with all the nurses on here ;\)
_________________________
One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1073891 --- 09/07/09 08:25 PM Re: Swine flu could cause up to 90,000 U.S. deaths [Re: AnneSmile]
VM Smith Offline
Diamond Member

Registered: 11/29/05
Posts: 38160
Loc: Ship of Fools
"Hopefully you know I'm being a smart aleck"

I know, and I love you all the more when you're that way.

Swine flu is a major concern, partly because we don't yet know how many will be infected, and partly because we're not yet certain that it won't mutate.

However, let's not panic, and let's just take all the usual, common sense precautions, plus continue to study up on it, and perhaps, try some things we think might help.

Case in point: I started taking 1400 IU vitamin D, and will probably go to 2000, as the days shorten. Will it help? IDK, but it might help with flu, according to some, and maybe with other things, like my blood pressure, according to many. And I don't think it can hurt; many now believe the safe limit is far higher than the currently recommended one, and that the RDA should also be far higher that it is presently.. I agree. I found this interesting:


Just One Pill Away

by Bill Sardi


Humanity is on the verge of a gigantic leap forward in health promotion with rapid-fire discoveries that a single vitamin pill may vanquish cancer and heart disease, the two leading causes of mortality in the U.S., as well as quell autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus), diminish the occurrence of diabetes, reduce obesity, and effectively treat multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and high blood pressure, plus conquer the common cold and even defeat tuberculosis, an infectious lung disease that affects one-third of the people of the world.

Literally leading medicine "out of dark ages" is the sunshine vitamin – vitamin D. Long mischaracterized as a vitamin that can be toxic if taken in amounts that exceed what is found in common multivitamins, and mistakenly said that vitamin D must be chemically altered to produce a man-made molecular version that does not induce over-calcification, most physicians, pharmacists and dieticians have been incorrectly trained to warn the public away from higher doses of vitamin D.

Most multivitamins provide no more than 400 IU (international units – a trivial 10 micrograms, or 1/100th of one milligram) of vitamin D, and the National Academy of Sciences says 2000 IU (50 micrograms) is the safe upper limit, with toxicity beginning around 10,000 IU (250 micrograms).

But Reinhold Vieth PhD, researcher at the University of Toronto, notes that blood levels don’t even measurably rise till 4000 IU (100 micrograms) is consumed and toxicity begins at 40,000 IU (1000 micrograms or 1 milligram) only after many weeks of use.

To demonstrate just how ridiculous the warnings of vitamin D overdose have been, a person standing in the summer sun for an hour at noontime in a Southern latitude (Arizona, Florida) in swim trunks would naturally produce about 10,000 IU (250 micrograms) of vitamin D through skin exposure. Sun poisoning from vitamin D overdose has never been reported. [Am J Clinical Nutrition 73 (2): 288-94, Feb 2001; Am J Clinical Nutrition 69(5): 842-56, May 1999]

Researchers recently stated that the Food & Nutrition Board’s 2000 IU (50 microgram) upper safe limit is not based on current evidence and that the absence of any toxicity in healthy adults at 10,000 IU (250 micrograms) should be supported as the completely safe upper daily limit. [American Journal Clinical Nutrition 85: 6-18, Jan. 2007]

What doesn’t vitamin D cure?

The fast-paced publication of reports extolling the virtues of vitamin D is astounding. William B Grant PhD of the Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center in San Francisco, says there is compelling evidence that low vitamin D levels lead to increased risk of rickets (soft bones), osteoporosis (loss of bone), 16 cancers (including prostate, breast, colon, ovary, Hodgkin’s lymphoma), as well as psoriasis, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and susceptibility to tuberculosis. [Journal Cosmetic Dermatology 2: 86-98, 2003]

Dr. Robert P Heaney of Creighton University says that efforts to elevate vitamin D beyond prevailing levels in North Americans improves calcium absorption, reduces falls and hip fractures, protects against various cancers and autoimmune disorders and says that "a strong case can be made for immediate improvement in vitamin D status of the general population." [Journal Steroid Biochemistry Molecular Biology Jan 9, 2007]

Vitamin D and heart disease

It is increasingly becoming apparent that it is excessive calcium, and not cholesterol, that causes hardening of the arteries and heart attacks. Only about 3% of arterial plaque is cholesterol while 50% is calcium. Vitamin D is an anti-calcifying agent. [Osteoporosis International 18: 251-59, 2007] Kidney disease patients, who are plagued with arterial calcifications, have 10 times the cardiac death rate compared to the general population.

What most doctors and the public have been told is that high-dose vitamin D can induce calcifications of arteries. But Armin Zittermann, PhD, of the Northrhine Westfalia Heart Center in Germany, reports that both extremely high and commonly low intake levels of vitamin D induce calcification of arteries. Calcification from overdose of vitamin D requires many hundreds of thousands of international units and is rare, whereas hundreds of millions of adults are deficient in vitamin D and suffer from calcified arteries as a result of deficiency. Dr. Zitterman points to a study conducted in Japan where adequate vitamin D levels achieved via supplementation reduced the death risk from cardiovascular disease by 70% compared to those who did not use vitamin D supplements. [Current Opinion Lipidology 18: 41-46, Feb. 2007]

Cancer reduction

In February of 2006 a research team led by Cedric F. Garland of the University of California at San Diego, reported that vitamin D supplementation would reduce the occurrence of a wide variety of cancers by 30-50%. [American Journal Public Health 96: 252-61, 2006]

It is estimated that 50,000-63,000 individuals in the United States, and 19,000-25,000 in Great Britain, die prematurely from cancer annually due to insufficient vitamin D. [Photochemistry Photobiology 81: 1276-86, 2005]

The geographical colon, breast, ovarian and prostate cancer belt that encircles the world is in the Northern latitudes. Cities like Seattle, Toronto, Boston, London, Dublin, Helsinki, Copenhagen, Berlin, Moscow, Anchorage, fall within this global belt and have high rates of these cancers.

Recently it was reported that 1000-2000 IU (25-50 micrograms) of vitamin D, obtained from dietary supplements, sunlight exposure, or the diet, would cut the risk of colon cancer in half. [American Journal Preventive Medicine 32: 210-16, 2007]

The common cold

Dr. John Cannell MD, who captains the Vitamin D Council, recently authored a paper which shows the winter increase in colds and flu is attributed to low seasonal vitamin D levels. Dr. Cannell cites the earlier work of R. Edgar Hope-Simpson who first proposed that variations in exposure to solar radiation explains the seasonality of influenza epidemics. [Epidemiological Infection 134: 1129-40, Dec. 2006] Dr. Cannell even has a challenge for visitors to the Vitamin D Council website. He suggests high-dose vitamin D (50,000 IU – 1.25 milligrams) be consumed for 3 days at the first sign of a cold or the flu. So far, Dr. Cannell is receiving many reports of how quickly high-dose vitamin D overpowers the common cold (this writer tried high-dose vitamin D with the first sign of sniffles this winter, and the vitamin D therapy worked rapidly both times).

How did vitamin D escape notice?

Just how vitamin D has not drawn greater attention is difficult to fathom. In winter, when vitamin D levels are low, death rates around the world rise. Winter is the season for heart attacks. The diagnosis of cancer in winter months shortens survival times. There is a decline in mood in winter months, leading to an increase in carbohydrate consumption and obesity. In older adults, low vitamin D levels are associated with mental depression. [American Journal Geriatric Psychiatry 14: 1032-40, 2006]

It’s not like vitamin D hasn’t been brought to center stage. Feature articles in Newsweek and US News & World Report in December of 2006 have been published. But are doctors informing their patients of the revolution underway and prescribing vitamin D? Not yet. Will they ever?

Cutting cancer rates by 30-50%, heart disease by up to 70%, may be too much of a shock now that health care is an industry that relies upon volumes of patients to treat. Prevention is anathema. Medical centers depend upon large numbers of patients to treat to pay off mortgages for building projects. Medical device and drug companies must churn high numbers not only to remain profitable, but to prop up their stock prices on Wall Street. One wonders whether modern medicine will ever let this vitamin D revolution happen? It appears health authorities have misdirected the public.

So far, there has been no response from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) regarding this breakthrough. No press conferences like the NIH typically conducts for breakthrough drugs. The reports of vitamin D’s health benefits are coming from independent researchers rather than public health authorities, who are dragging their feet on this surprising development.

Sun, diet or pills?

It’s difficult for most people to get optimal amounts of vitamin D. The diet, at best, will only provide a few hundred units of vitamin D. Milk is fortified with synthetic vitamin D2, which is not nearly as potent as natural D3, which is used in most dietary supplements. A glass of milk provides only 100 IU (2.5 micrograms).

Fifteen minutes of sun exposure to 40-percent of the body is suggested daily for fair-skinned individuals, and more time for dark-skinned people. People with dark skin pigmentation simply don’t make as much vitamin D as Caucasians. A recent study conducted in a northern state (Michigan) found 50% of black mothers and 65% of their newborn infants were vitamin D deficient. [Clinical Pediatrics 46: 42-44, 2007] Even adults who receive adequate sun exposure have been found to be deficient in vitamin D. [Menopause Feb 6, 2007]

Virtually all of northern Europe is either deficient or undernourished, and in sunny middle-eastern countries, vitamin D deficiency is rampant because of clothing that covers most of the skin. [Journal Steroid Biochemistry Molecular Biology Feb. 5, 2007]

Humans have been made phobic about sunlight exposure, fearful of skin cancer and the deadly malignant melanoma. But it is interesting to note that mortality rates for melanoma rose steeply after sunscreens came into common use, not before. Sunscreen lotion blocks the vitamin D-producing UV-B rays, while allowing the deeper-penetrating, cancer-causing UV-A rays to burn the skin.

Calculating the cost of deficiency

Researchers Cedric Garland, William B Grant and Edward D. Gorham claim it would cost about $1 billion a year to provide 1000 IU (250 micrograms) of vitamin D to all adult Americans, and the expected benefits for cancer would be in the range of $16-25 billion. [Recent Results Cancer Research 174: 225-34, 2007] The total U.S. economic burden due to vitamin D insufficiency from inadequate exposure to solar UV-B radiation, diet, food fortification and supplements is estimated at $40-56 billion annually (2004). [Photochemistry Photobiology 81: 1276-86, 2005]

Many health food stores stock 1000 IU and 2000 IU vitamin D pills. Higher-dose 5000 IU and 50,000 IU vitamin D pills are more difficult to find and can be purchased from this trusted website.

February 20, 2007


Edited by VM Smith (09/07/09 08:28 PM)
_________________________
If you vote for government, you have no right to complain about what government does.

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#1080013 --- 09/22/09 03:15 PM Re: Swine flu [Re: VM Smith]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
Just a note:

I currently live in FL, two of my friends kids had the Swine. Just a really bad case of the flu, they were scared of course. It was a week of ups and downs, one had to have IV for dehydration but all are well now. The Dr. diagnosed them and two were able to get Tamiflu.

Just wanted to let people know not to worry, yes be careful and concerned but there are more survival stories then horror stories. I think the news like to scare us, the survival stories or no fun in their minds so why report them.

P.S. As you know by reading this thread I was worried at first too; now that I personally know people who have gone through it with their kids I have calmed down. Thought it might help sooth some fears.


Edited by AnneSmile (09/22/09 03:38 PM)
_________________________
One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1080096 --- 09/22/09 06:25 PM Re: Swine flu [Re: AnneSmile]
Senecamom Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/04/06
Posts: 7411
Loc: On a journey......
You are aware that the CDC set forth rules that any flu, ANY, will be considered the swine flu- actual numbers will never really be known.......so if you get the flu it may or may not be the swine flu. just an FYI....
_________________________
~Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there.~

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#1080141 --- 09/22/09 08:58 PM Re: Swine flu [Re: Senecamom]
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
YES I do believe the Media loves to exaggerate and get everyone wound up! They has school kids so scared every time my daughter coughs or sneezes she thinks she's dying from the swine flu
_________________________
No Mullet...NO Glory!!

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#1080142 --- 09/22/09 08:58 PM Re: Swine flu [Re: Senecamom]
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
YES I do believe the Media loves to exaggerate and get everyone wound up! They have school kids so scared.... every time my daughter coughs or sneezes she thinks she's dying from the swine flu
_________________________
No Mullet...NO Glory!!

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#1080258 --- 09/23/09 02:41 AM Re: Swine flu [Re: Senecamom]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
Originally Posted By: senecamom
You are aware that the CDC set forth rules that any flu, ANY, will be considered the swine flu- actual numbers will never really be known.......so if you get the flu it may or may not be the swine flu. just an FYI....


Where is the report that all flu will now be considered H1N1?

In the cases of my friends the Doctors did the tests and they came back swine; another friend of mine, her daughter's didn't come back as swine. Honestly from their symptoms you couldn't tell the difference until the tests came back. Either way the media has people wound up with focusing on the deaths and not the survival rates.
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#1080260 --- 09/23/09 02:44 AM Re: Swine flu [Re: Scottie2Hottie]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
Originally Posted By: Scottie2Hottie
YES I do believe the Media loves to exaggerate and get everyone wound up! They have school kids so scared.... every time my daughter coughs or sneezes she thinks she's dying from the swine flu


Not only the schools, there is a girl at work who is using this excuse to call out every time she sneezes, very annoying. She is now complaining that work is holding it against her by repeating to them what the media is saying, they finally told her to go to the Doctor if she is that worried. (She has allergies and has attendance issues regardless of the hysteria, just an excuse for her) I admit I was worried at first too but now seeing it and listening to people who went through it I'm not as worried, still washing my hands and taking my vitamins but not fearful of it. The media sucks.


Edited by AnneSmile (09/23/09 02:48 AM)
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One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1080284 --- 09/23/09 03:59 AM Re: H1N1/Swine Flu [Re: AnneSmile]
AnneSmile Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/01/08
Posts: 9955
Loc: Amusement
Here are the CDC links, thought it might help instead of getting information for different news agencies.

2009 H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)

H1N1 Flu Clinical and Public Health Guidance

2009 H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and You

FluView/Weekly Report

2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine
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One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above the little things.

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#1080711 --- 09/24/09 09:04 AM Re: Swine flu [Re: AnneSmile]
Scottie2Hottie Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/27/03
Posts: 16463
Loc: aka Brightside
Originally Posted By: AnneSmile
Originally Posted By: Scottie2Hottie
YES I do believe the Media loves to exaggerate and get everyone wound up! They have school kids so scared.... every time my daughter coughs or sneezes she thinks she's dying from the swine flu


Not only the schools, there is a girl at work who is using this excuse to call out every time she sneezes, very annoying. She is now complaining that work is holding it against her by repeating to them what the media is saying, they finally told her to go to the Doctor if she is that worried. (She has allergies and has attendance issues regardless of the hysteria, just an excuse for her) I admit I was worried at first too but now seeing it and listening to people who went through it I'm not as worried, still washing my hands and taking my vitamins but not fearful of it. The media sucks.



OMG! Is your co-workers name Chris??!!?? SOunds like my co-worker that it took 3 years for my boss to fire! It started when she called in sick twice her first week of work and rapidly went downhill from there. Also she drew a patients blood and it was released 2 days later he had H1N1 and all of a sudden as soon as she found out, she said "OMG I am sick...I drew his blood" and she instantly started with the fake coughing and sniffles and taking her temperature every 5 minutes... She used that excuse 5 times in 3 weeks!
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