Gardening forum

Posted by: bluezone

Gardening forum - 01/24/08 08:23 AM

(tried to look up the older gardening thread but not accessible)

started a new one.
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 08:52 AM

I can't wait for the warmer weather so I can get out in the gardens and start working. I have many plans for this years gardens, but it will all depend upon how much money I have come spring.

One thing I have to do this year is replace the fence and gate on the one side of my house. I'm thinking about putting up an 8 foot arbor (trellis) that will span the side yard allowing a wisteria to grow over it and drape down. On the back side of it, I will need to put in a new fence/gate to keep the dogs in the back yard, but I am thinking that under it, I will build benches with maybe some flower planters.
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 09:40 AM

I want to do something similar. I've got a butterfly garden on the east side of my house. I've been thinking about putting up some sort of arbor/trellis for some trumpet vines to kind of hide our out door oil tank.( ya know.... hide it yet leave it accessable.) I'm worried about the weight of the plants on the arbor/trellis. I think I may do concrete footings to add extra support. How far deep should I put the footings in?! (Definitly would want it below the frost line!)

I've been looking through the new Michigan Bulb Co. catalog.....made a nice "wish list"!!
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 10:17 AM

My understanding is you want to go 4 feet down for the posts. I would definitely use cement to help stabilize them.

I just printed out some plans from bhg.com for a butterfly garden. The plants it recomments are:

Butterfly Weed, Yellow Yarrow, Purple dome aster, red star aster, purple butterfly bush, purple coneflower, phlox, gayfeather, russian sage, bee balm, Oregano, black eyed susans, coreopsis, stonecrop, iris, goldenrod, blue pincushion flower, blue fescue, sweet alyssum, parsley, and zinnia. I'm tempted to eventually make my entire back yard nothing but perennial gardens with no lawn other than paths that wander through the gardens.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 12:42 PM

I've always wanted to do that, TRD...Sigh...some day.
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 12:57 PM

First step for me might happen this year. I want to replace the picket fencing that surrounds part of my back yard with stockade fencing and then plant slow growing pines, rhododondrons and other flowering shrubs all the way around the perimeter.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 08:23 PM

I hope you'll post a picture.
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/08 10:10 PM

I have some AWESOME CAD programs for landscaping, so I'm all set with my designs/ plant placement, as well as what plants to use. (I'm a LD as well as a Master Gardener.) I know there are some fairly good programs you can find at any major book store as well as Wally World. Sierra and Broderbund have two that were suggested when I was in college working on my degree.


Michigan Bulb Co. has some great "garden packages". Nice variety of specific plants for specific designs or locations. ie; "Shade Garden", "Butterfly Garden", They normally send you 3 of each plant in a theme ( sometimes more dependig on the "garden") and send you an actual blue print for placement planting. I THINK they have a special running till the 15th of Feb, where if you spend a certain amount of money on plants they will send you $20 worth of plants free. (Something tells me the shipping is NOT free!) You should check that out HP! Especially if you want something nice and are on a budget.
Posted by: sparky's back

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 04:02 AM

I have to have my whole back yard dug up..for some reason I can't get the grass to grow,there was grass when we bought the house 6 years ago BUT now,I get nothing,PLUS Einstein has chewed or dug up all the plants/bushes I planted last year,grrrrr..so now I will start over..again.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 04:23 AM

Originally Posted By: marlboronymom
I have some AWESOME CAD programs for landscaping, so I'm all set with my designs/ plant placement, as well as what plants to use. (I'm a LD as well as a Master Gardener.) I know there are some fairly good programs you can find at any major book store as well as Wally World. Sierra and Broderbund have two that were suggested when I was in college working on my degree.


Michigan Bulb Co. has some great "garden packages". Nice variety of specific plants for specific designs or locations. ie; "Shade Garden", "Butterfly Garden", They normally send you 3 of each plant in a theme ( sometimes more dependig on the "garden") and send you an actual blue print for placement planting. I THINK they have a special running till the 15th of Feb, where if you spend a certain amount of money on plants they will send you $20 worth of plants free. (Something tells me the shipping is NOT free!) You should check that out HP! Especially if you want something nice and are on a budget.


I'm very familiar with Michigan Bulb as well as many other bulb and seed companies...my problem has more to do with space and time. I just don't have the space in my current location. It's an apartment, and while it's part of a house (inlaw type apartment) the landlords prefer I not tear up their yard. I take advantage of the fact that my mother is aging and go help her when I need a dirt fix!:)
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 07:27 AM

Originally Posted By: sparky's back
I have to have my whole back yard dug up..for some reason I can't get the grass to grow,there was grass when we bought the house 6 years ago BUT now,I get nothing,PLUS Einstein has chewed or dug up all the plants/bushes I planted last year,grrrrr..so now I will start over..again.


How aggrivating!

Did you have a grub problem last year?! I know we had a massive japanese beetle problem down here last summer/fall. The skunks were in grub heaven and we had lots of holes in our lawn from them digging.
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 07:31 AM

[quote=HeavenlyPlaces

I'm very familiar with Michigan Bulb as well as many other bulb and seed companies...my problem has more to do with space and time. I just don't have the space in my current location. It's an apartment, and while it's part of a house (inlaw type apartment) the landlords prefer I not tear up their yard. I take advantage of the fact that my mother is aging and go help her when I need a dirt fix!:) [/quote]

Good that you can go some place to get a "dirt fix!" ( Love that! )


Do you do "container gardening?!
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 08:16 AM

Originally Posted By: marlboronymom
Originally Posted By: sparky's back
I have to have my whole back yard dug up..for some reason I can't get the grass to grow,there was grass when we bought the house 6 years ago BUT now,I get nothing,PLUS Einstein has chewed or dug up all the plants/bushes I planted last year,grrrrr..so now I will start over..again.


How aggrivating!

Did you have a grub problem last year?! I know we had a massive japanese beetle problem down here last summer/fall. The skunks were in grub heaven and we had lots of holes in our lawn from them digging.


Last summer was so dry I had to water almost daily to keep the grass from drying up and blowing away. My soil is very sandy and no matter how much watering I do, it is dry in no time at all.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 12:32 PM

Originally Posted By: marlboronymom
Originally Posted By: sparky's back
I have to have my whole back yard dug up..for some reason I can't get the grass to grow,there was grass when we bought the house 6 years ago BUT now,I get nothing,PLUS Einstein has chewed or dug up all the plants/bushes I planted last year,grrrrr..so now I will start over..again.


How aggrivating!

Did you have a grub problem last year?! I know we had a massive japanese beetle problem down here last summer/fall. The skunks were in grub heaven and we had lots of holes in our lawn from them digging.


Nope, no grubs or Japanese beetles...or at least not so we noticed. The infestation here has been minimal the past few years. And believe me...I'm NOT complaining!


I also have some serious time constraints now, so for the time being I'm content being my mother's "yard boy" from time to time. It works well for both of us. I do the heavy work...she picks out the pretty stuff...and...well, she shares!
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/08 12:34 PM

BTW...I recommend checking out Garden's Alive (I think they're online now, as well as via regular mail catalog) for their organic grub killer...it's kind of cool, and one of those bio-organics. Anyway, check them out before spring because I think you need to apply this stuff before the grass really starts to take off.
Posted by: ~Ellie~

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/08 04:44 AM

At the end of the season I bought a small tiller...can't wait to play in the dirt!
Posted by: sparky's back

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/08 06:34 AM

Originally Posted By: marlboronymom
Originally Posted By: sparky's back
I have to have my whole back yard dug up..for some reason I can't get the grass to grow,there was grass when we bought the house 6 years ago BUT now,I get nothing,PLUS Einstein has chewed or dug up all the plants/bushes I planted last year,grrrrr..so now I will start over..again.


How aggrivating!

Did you have a grub problem last year?! I know we had a massive japanese beetle problem down here last summer/fall. The skunks were in grub heaven and we had lots of holes in our lawn from them digging.


I believe it started with the dogs romping in the yard,the kids and their four wheelers..LOL
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/08 07:55 AM

try some pelletized lime and try to stay off from it for a day or so- hard to do with pets and children...the lime will drive grubs out and "sweeten" the soil. (Raise the PH)
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/08 02:48 PM

kids, dogs and a lawn. yep...know how that is!

I'd get the soil tested BEFORE putting anything down. It MAY not be a pH problem. It also MAY not be a soil nutrition problem. You MAY need to add a 10-10-10 ( N,P,K) fertilizer to your lawn. OR it could just be that you need to put down grass that performs better in those high traffic areas.( Scott's packages grass seed for high traffic areas, as does a few other companies.) If you get the soil tested FIRST, you won't have to worry about wasting money on something that your soil may or may not need.

You can get soil testing kits anyplace that has a garden center. The Seneca CCE should have some available. You may even want to give their MAster Garden Hotline a call. (I THINK that still only runs on Wed.)
Posted by: sparky's back

Re: Gardening forum - 01/29/08 04:37 AM

Thanks for this info..I will try this first.
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 02/01/08 12:48 PM

MG hotline is in the morning Tues. Thurs. AND just to clairify something soil/pH samples are sent to the Ithaca lab.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/13/08 07:33 AM

Can I plant my roses today?
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 02/13/08 08:34 AM

How many people start seeds inside? If you do, when do you start them?
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 02/13/08 05:22 PM

I don't any more but I used to. As for when to start them...well it depends on what plants. Organic Gardening used to have a good chart based on your growing zone. I'd check them out...but I'd imagine you could find something usable at most gardening sites.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 02/14/08 03:14 PM

Try this one. Little care, lots of blooms, grows fast, and really does bring in the hummers. Nice, dark green foliage, too. Since it readily sends out volunteer shoots, it will spread fast, too, so you can start with wide spacing, more cheaply. No trouble to cut the unwanted ones, though:

http://www.directgardening.com/detail.asp?pid=7306
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/08 11:17 AM

Originally Posted By: TRD_Tacoma
How many people start seeds inside? If you do, when do you start them?


OK heres a great tip... and you are saving money and recycling ..
don't buy those peat moss pots or plastic planting trays anymore .
Take a tomato paste can ( you can use any size can ,just remember that the size can you use is the size of the pot.), and newspaper.
Cut the newspaper to fit the can,with that , let about 1 in hang at the bottom and roll the paper about 3 times around the can fold the bottom of the paper so that it overlaps .
Now press down and turn the can to make a crease in the bottom,slip the can out ,if the top doesn't want to stay put just fold the top down a bit and it will stay.
Fill with dirt,seed and put in a flat tray (make sure there are NO holes in the tray. set your paper pots in there and fill tray with about 1/2 in or so of water. when ready to transplant plant paper pots and all.Make sure you cover all the top paper . Your plants will love you because there will be no shock from transplanting them!
Posted by: ovidtech

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 07:16 AM

I like that idea reilley. Thanks, we'll give that a try soon. I Hope.
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 09:31 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Try this one. Little care, lots of blooms, grows fast, and really does bring in the hummers. Nice, dark green foliage, too. Since it readily sends out volunteer shoots, it will spread fast, too, so you can start with wide spacing, more cheaply. No trouble to cut the unwanted ones, though:

http://www.directgardening.com/detail.asp?pid=7306


Don't put in a trumpet vine unless you are prepared for it to take over. It is a very invasive plant that once planted, you will have a very hard time getting rid of it.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 06:21 PM

I really like mine. They do send out shoots, but as long as you keep an eye on the plants, and think about what you want them to do, they're easy to keep trimmed (they're easy to snap off with bare hands), and if the shoots come up where you don't want them to, you can just break or cut them off.

I tie mine to my deck rail and posts, as they grow, and let them get long and beautiful there, and it allows me to see hummers close-up. Any that sprout up away from the deck, I just mow.
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 06:45 PM

One street over from me, someone has one in the front yard. In the summer, their entire front yard is nothing but shoots coming up.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum *DELETED* - 03/04/08 08:07 PM

Post deleted by VM Smith
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 08:29 PM

This one is a very old plant. The main trunk of it is probably a foot or more in diameter. I have seen trumpet vine send out shoots underground a good 10 to 15 foot before it comes above ground.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 08:31 PM

The farthest I've seen shoots come up from my desired (climbing) locations is about 8'-10'. For me, mowing them works well, as does just yanking them while they're young and tender. Maybe that's because I don't fertilize my lawn, since I'm on the lake, and worry about phosphate run off.

When I see a runner starting to snake away over the ground, I just break it off, or tie it to the deck with string, or drive a nail for it to rest on, depending on whether I want it on a rail, 4"x4", or face board or outer joist..

I have gable windows on my house ends, with cathedral tongue and groove roof decking, and have the vines planted at the rear wall, also, so that they climb to the roof in summer, and block the west sun through the gable windows in the late afternoon. I have plywood and batten, with a batten at every stud. I like that they don't worm tendrils under the battens, but use sort of a "glue" spot to hang on. A putty knife will easily remove the "glue" spots when I paint.

In this short season climate, my preference is for things that grow luxuriantly and fast, and I don't mind the minimal amount of maintainence necessary.

The foliage stays green quite late in the fall, and when it dies off,I just yank the vines off the house, and trim them low.

Between the blossoms, and the fact that the house is marigold, I get butterflies and hummers in abundance.

To each his own, but I really like the plant. If anyone got one and didn't like it, well, there's alway topically applied spray weed killer, which will kill all vestiges of the vine fairly quickly.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/08 08:36 PM

Originally Posted By: TRD_Tacoma
This one is a very old plant. The main trunk of it is probably a foot or more in diameter. I have seen trumpet vine send out shoots underground a good 10 to 15 foot before it comes above ground.


Mine are younger, and the woody, older parts are probably 2 1/2' diameter. I think that if they get too thick, I can saw them off very low in the fall or early spring, and they'll come back on the same stump. or else I could just train new stalks from new shoots from the ground up.
Posted by: rapunzel2

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 11:44 AM

i have tons of bee balm and some butterfly bushes i can share...
Posted by: rapunzel2

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 11:47 AM

i normally start seeds 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date ....
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 11:53 AM

what is ...bee balm and I never heard of butterfly bushes ,
I am intrested , if you live between weedsport and seneca falls ,waterloo. I am game for new ....
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 12:22 PM

Bee Balm is an perenniel. It grows maybe 2 feet in height. Each stem is topped with a feathery looking flower approximately an inch in diameter. It is a favorite of bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. I have it in 3 different colors: Pink, red, and purple.

Butterfly bushes are a shrub that will grow easily 6 feet tall or more. As the flower, you will get cone shaped groupings of tiny little flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love. I have one that is a dark purple (almost black), another that is lavender, and also a white one. They have quite a bit of scent, almost like a tea smell.
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 12:24 PM

Bee Balm




Butterfly Bush

Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 03:01 PM

I found pictures of a verigated Butterfly Bush. The clumps of flowers range from pink to yellow on the SAME stem. This just looks so pretty. I bet it would look great in a garden with bee-balm and cone flowers!
http://michiganbulb.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_71685

I may try to get one of those, see how it well it grows in this horrible soil of mine.



(You can get butterfly bushes with pink, purple,yellow, and white blooms on the same plant or just get individual colored bloms on one plant)
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 03:33 PM

Wow, that is an interesting butterfly bush.

One of my fav's is the Crososmia Lucifer

http://www.perennialfavoritesnursery.com/Images/Perennials/Crocosmia%20Lucifer.jpg
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/08 04:30 PM

yea.. I like those too. Even "George Davidson"-the yellow version- is pretty. Kind of sort of reminds me of Freesias...but much "hardier."
Posted by: SFMom

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/08 08:03 PM

Does anyone know about trillium seeds? I bought some at Lowes and the directions just say basically dig a hole and dump. I didn't know if anyone had any experience with this type of plant...just looking for any advice. Thanks!
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/08 09:51 PM

Originally Posted By: SFMom
Does anyone know about trillium seeds? I bought some at Lowes and the directions just say basically dig a hole and dump. I didn't know if anyone had any experience with this type of plant...just looking for any advice. Thanks!


SFMom , I just looked up trillium seeds ... the things I have read, it takes anywhere from 7 to 15 years to bloom those little white flowers !! I will ck with the garden group I belong to and see what they say. hopefully I read it all wrong but I will ck for you.
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/08 11:29 AM

this is what was sent to me ..
yep dump in to the hole ,but remember where you plant them.
According to:
Picking the flowers of Trillium can seriously injure the plant. The three leaves below the flower are the plant's only food source and a picked trillium may die or take many years to recover. For this reason in many areas, e.g. British Columbia, Michigan, New York, Oregon, and Washington, it is illegal to pick trilliums. While a popular belief is held that it is illegal to pick the common Trillium grandiflorum (white trillium) in Ontario, no such law actually exists. However, the Trillium flexipes (drooping trillium) is protected by law in Ontario [1], where it maintains its very small Canadian population.

Trillium is one of many plants whose seeds are spread by ants and mice. Trillium seeds have a fleshy organ called an elaiosome that attracts ants. The ants take the seeds to their nest, where they eat the elaiosomes and put the seeds in their garbage, where they can be protected until they germinate. They also get the added bonus of growing in a medium made richer by the ant garbage.

Some trilliums have a flower which is bent downward, below the leaves.

A white trillium serves as the emblem and official flower of the Canadian province of Ontario. It features prominently on the Franco-Ontarian flag.

Trillium - Fact Sheets - Toadshade, Wakerobin

Growing from seed is such a thrill. In the third or forth year, the trilliums can be individually planted in pots for an additional year or two. In the fifth to the seventh year, they will bloom. Every year thereafter they can increase with offsets from the main rhizome. Future generations will enjoy them too, since trillium are well-known for their longevity.
Trillium Page One Hope these pages help...Seems sawdust that is decomposed is very much liked by these plants.
Posted by: TRD_Tacoma

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/08 02:08 PM

I got some Trillium bulbs 2 years ago at the Rochester Public Market. They came up and bloomed last year. I have also had luck with some Trillium plants I have bought at nurseries in the area.

Also, they tend to like shaded areas without a lot of sun.
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/08 02:24 PM

really ? gees what the heck was I reading ...7 to 16 years , (sounds like a prison sentence)
I couldn't imagine it taking that long but ,,who knows .
Thanks TRD \:\)
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/08 07:54 PM

Just ask yourself, Reilly, "What will I have in 7 to 16 years if I DON'T plant the seeds?"
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 04/01/08 12:52 AM

roflol...good one HP , glad to have you back \:\)
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/01/08 01:15 AM

Originally Posted By: HeavenlyPlaces
Just ask yourself, Reilly, "What will I have in 7 to 16 years if I DON'T plant the seeds?"


I don't know what she'll have, but I've a hunch that you'll have the year round flowers of C.R..
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/01/08 01:19 AM

I've got them in my gully, plus a few that my mom transplanted years ago, I think, to another spot.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/01/08 06:20 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Originally Posted By: HeavenlyPlaces
Just ask yourself, Reilly, "What will I have in 7 to 16 years if I DON'T plant the seeds?"


I don't know what she'll have, but I've a hunch that you'll have the year round flowers of C.R..


True enough! I miss the bright pinks and yellows and oranges already...heck I even miss the purples and reds too! Hibiscus as big as a dinner plate.....and people that you want to spend a lifetime getting to know!
Posted by: Ditchwitch

Re: Gardening forum - 04/02/08 12:53 PM

I have 5 Early Girl tomato plants getting ready to bloom! :),plus hundreds of herb seedlings,moonflowers already blooming,we've been eating lettuce & chives,& have sprouted several plants from our wisteria seed pods....I LOVE SPRING! \:\)
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 04/02/08 09:13 PM

Ditchwitch , What is moonflowers? I have never heard of them.

I have a house that looks like a greenhouse ..wait till hubby gets home and see what I have created lol . Flower seeds that have sprouted and Saturday .. The veggie plants will get a head start before I get them in the garden. Yippeee !! No snow, sun is out, lilacs have buds on them.. Hubby is building a raised garden thing for me \:\) Spring is Good.
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 04/02/08 10:22 PM

DW I have TRIED and TRIED to get wiseria seed pods to sprout and I have had no such luck. Mine keep rotting in the soil. How the heck did you get them to sprout?! What's your secret!!? Now....I've had tons of luck with "False Mimosa" seeds. If any of you want to try growing those, I can send you some seeds!!
Posted by: Ditchwitch

Re: Gardening forum - 04/03/08 09:55 AM

Moonflowers are a relative of morning glories (ipomoea family) that has large white flowers that bloom at night. I have a very large star jasmine that is about 12 feet long,she blooms all the time, but is more fragrant at night.The 2 combined gives the living room a heavenly perfume! The sunroom (10 X 18)is on the south side of the living room & is part of it, not a separate room.3 steps down, & we have a fountain,heated tile floor,so it makes for a nice living room!
Morning glories bloom in the day & have little to no scent, so I grow them for color in the sunroom.
Oh, the wisteria! I have one here at home,it's maybe 4 or 5 years old now, & last year & the year before were it's biggest blooms to date. I started seeds from it last year & have the youngsters planted here n there,& have more in the sunroom that I started from the seeds that are on it now. They seem to sprout easily for me; I have that effect on my plants, I guess ;P
My booth at the Sterling Renn Faire has a humoungous wisteria that Hillwoman started.I know it's a different variety than the one here;the seeds are bigger,fatter,different color, & very difficult to start. The ones here are smaller seeds,thin,sprout very quickly. I think one of the Sterling seeds is finally starting to sprout,tho.... I always soak them overnight,then put in the soil.
I have loads of herb seeds starting for the Faire....no one had sold herb plants there before, so I changed that! \:\)

here's a link to a picture of my booth..(I'm the short one,lol) to the right hand side of the pic is where the wisteria grows;she is inside all 3 floors of my booth has branches about 8 inches around in places! I don't know the species (Chinese,Japanese,etc) of either plant.

http://s99.photobucket.com/albums/l293/w...4SRF8-12-07.jpg
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 04/03/08 12:25 PM

kinda like ..as seen on TV but cheaper !





How to Plant Hanging Tomato Plants upside down !
By eHow Home & Garden Editor

Tomato plants don't only have to be planted in the ground. They can thrive hanging upside down as well. In fact, planting your tomato plants wrong-side-up can allow you to move them with the sun, save you time weeding and give you fruit that is within arms reach of your front door. Read on to learn how to plant hanging tomato plants.
Instructions
Difficulty: Moderate
Things You’ll Need:
5-Gallon Bucket
Drill or Utility Knife
Tomato Seedling (a tomato bush works better)
Newspaper
Soil
Step 1:
Purchase an empty 5-gallon bucket with a snap-on lid. This bucket can be found at hardware stores. Clean the bucket with warm sudsy water to prepare it for planting your tomato plant.
Step 2:
Cut a hole in the bucket using a drill or a utility knife. The hole should be right in the middle of the bottom of the bucket and about 2 to 3 inches in diameter. Cut several 1/2-inch holes in the snap-on lid of the bucket to allow you to water your plant.
Step 3:
Place several layers of newspaper in the bottom of the bucket, covering the hole. This will later be used to anchor the tomato plant.
Step 4:
Fill the bucket with a 40-lb. bag of soil and put on the lid. Soils with vitamin additives, like Miracle-Gro, are the best for growing tomatoes.
Step 5:
Turn the bucket over, and plant the tomato seedling. Cut two slits in the newspaper at the bottom of the bucket to allow you to plant the tomato plant. Plant the seedling with only about 3 inches of the plant coming out of the hole. Use extra soil to anchor it in the bucket.
Step 6:
Hang the bucket in a sunny area and water. Tomatoes require at least 50 percent sunlight. Move the bucket according to where the most direct sun is during the day.
Step 7:
Harvest tomatoes as they ripen on the vine. Tomatoes will begin to form not long after the tomato plant flowers. The fruit should be red and firm before cutting from the plant.


Tips & Warnings
Tomato varieties with smaller fruit, such as a cherry or Roma tomatoes, are perfect plants for hanging upside down.
If you prefer a bucket that isn't white you can purchase spray paint especially for plastics and brighten up your planter.
There are several companies online that sell hanging tomato planters. These are a little different then the buckets but give you the same result.
Your hanging tomato planter will weigh between 35 and 50 lbs. when it is finished.
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 04/03/08 10:38 PM

I founf Moonflowers! gonna have to plant some ,thanks !
Posted by: Ditchwitch

Re: Gardening forum - 04/04/08 12:25 AM

Originally Posted By: reilley
I founf Moonflowers! gonna have to plant some ,thanks !


soak the seeds overnight,just like you'd do for morning glories; they'll sprout very quickly! \:\)
Posted by: marlboronymom

Re: Gardening forum - 04/04/08 03:20 PM

Do you use plain old water for soaking or do you put a bit of Miracle Grow in the water?! I just found some wisteria seeds in with my gardening items. Mine are the big round ones almost the size of a dime. Got them from a friend in Geneva, who has a wisteria "tree" that's a good 75-100 years old. I just might try soaking them over night and then popping them in some soil!
Posted by: Ditchwitch

Re: Gardening forum - 04/04/08 03:44 PM

I only use plain water. Plants don't need food until they have a few sets of "true" leaves; the first you see aren't leaves, but cotyledons,"seed leaves".Like all eggs,seeds contain all the nutrients needed for sprouting.
Good luck with the wisteria seeds! I know a bit of "wisdom" about starting wisteria from seeds rather than cuttings says the seed plants won't bloom, but I've started them from seeds & they still bloom in around 3 years. Gardening is truly a lesson in patience,lol! :)I have to get back to work now; I'm vending at the St Michael's Health Fair in Newark tomorrow, & need to load my car in between raindrops!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/29/09 06:27 PM

Time to plant yet?
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 01/29/09 07:25 PM

\:\)
Posted by: ~Ellie~

Re: Gardening forum - 01/29/09 07:37 PM

yeah but you'll have to use a snow shovel for winter planting
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 01/29/09 11:16 PM

I have so many flower seeds ... but I need bee balm and coneflowers to finish what I had started ....

one more closer to spring I want to start my seeds soon but its too soon.
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 02/02/09 10:11 PM

How do you get rid of trumpet vines? We moved in last year and are having an issue with one in our garden out back. Also those really bright pink flowers, sweet peas I think. I have read that they are annuals so I am hoping they don't grow back. Although it seems like they are ones to reseed and cause havoc. They just wrap up around everything else.

I really need help when it comes to gardening. There is so much that I want to do but I just don't know how. I am really bad at determining what should go where. Also those friggin' day lilies...ugh! Gardening is overwhelming, to say the least.

I'd like some coneflowers this year, I would be willing to trade something. I have lots of hostas, day lilies, trumpet vines, and false sunflowers...
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 02/03/09 12:19 AM

when its time ... pm me and I will help ya . I also belong to
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cnyplantcycle/ and we share ideas and tips and lots of seeds. If ya join let me know.
I can also give you ideas on ideas on where you could put things or designs
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/03/09 12:10 PM

Did the weather person say that the temperature may be 50 degrees this saturday?

Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 02/27/09 06:00 PM

Crocuses are coming out already....
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/09 11:06 AM

Warming up

50 degrees by Friday!!!!
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/09 05:25 PM

I am going to CNY BLOOMS, free parking, $2.00 off admission..I can't wait. This Year it will be held at the ONCENTER and not the State Fair :(, At the State Fair they have the RV show going on.
I figured that the SF Grounds were big enough that they coulf have had both going on. but nnnnoooo ,thats to logical.It might bring more people in..
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/09 09:57 PM

any buds yet?
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/09 10:09 PM

you can plant peas now ....
Posted by: Yetta Nother

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/09 10:27 PM

I left all my plants at my other place.....now I have to start over. Sigh.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/16/09 12:42 AM

Would spraying Round Up on the trumpet vine kill it?

Also, there are perennial Sweet Peas.

I wish I had more friggin' day lilies
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/16/09 01:08 AM

reilley, I found this info on Moonflowers

Gardening/Moon-Flowers
From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection
< Gardening
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MOON-FLOWERS are species of the morning-glory family that open their flowers at sunset. A well-grown plant trained over a porch trellis, or allowed to grow at random over a low tree or shrub, is a striking object when in full flower at dusk or through a moonlit evening. In the Southern states (where it is much grown) the moon-flower is a perennial, but even when well protected does not survive the winters in the North.

Cuttings usually give best results in the Northern states, as the seasons are not long enough for seed plants to give good bloom. Cuttings may be made before danger of frost and wintered in the house, or the plants may be grown from seed sown in January or February. Seeds should be scalded or filed just before sowing.

The true moon-flower is _Ipomoea Bona-Nox_ white-flowered; but there are other kinds that go under this name. This grows 20 to 30 feet where the seasons are long enough. They are pollinated by night-flying moths. Like most moth-pollinated flowers, the moon flower is white, which attracts moths. With the bloom, moon flower petals die in the morning after they open.


I also found this warning about them.

Caution should be taken when growing moonflowers in areas with small children or pets. While moonflowers are not harmful if touched, the plant is not meant for ingestion and is considered toxic. Side effects of moonflower seed ingestion include hallucinations and, in rare cases, respiratory distress. If these side effects appear in someone who has ingested part of the plant, it is advisable to call a local poison control or emergency services center immediately.

The flowers have large blooms and a delicate fragrance. The seeds, leaves and roots - when eaten, smoked or brewed into a tea - cause hallucinations and other medical problems.

Moonflowers are part of the Solanaceae family, Datura inoxia. The plant, which blooms at night, is typically 3 feet high and is native to the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico. In the fall,it produces thorny pods containing seeds.

Health officials say that similar or related plants, including Devil's Weed, Devil's trumpet and Jimson Weed, often are referred to as moonflower and could have similar toxic effects.

Within an hour of ingesting the moonflower plant, symptoms begin.

Ingesting the plant causes agitation, confusion and hallucinations. Heart rate and blood pressure can climb, mouths can become dry, skin turns dry, hot and flushed, and vision is blurred. In severe cases, the plant can cause seizures and comas.
Posted by: ~Ellie~

Re: Gardening forum - 03/16/09 03:12 PM

Originally Posted By: sparky's back
I have to have my whole back yard dug up..for some reason I can't get the grass to grow,there was grass when we bought the house 6 years ago BUT now,I get nothing,PLUS Einstein has chewed or dug up all the plants/bushes I planted last year,grrrrr..so now I will start over..again.


Spark, I have a tiller you can use if it isn't a real big yard...
Posted by: reilley

Re: Gardening forum - 03/16/09 03:56 PM

thank you
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/02/09 09:46 AM

Posted by: ~Ellie~

Re: Gardening forum - 04/02/09 12:23 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone


I was hoping we could start a fresh thread but oh well....I can delete it
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/17/10 07:48 AM

think spring
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/22/10 11:15 AM

tulips are emerging from the soil with this warmer weather
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 03/22/10 11:53 AM

Yup it's grand!
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/23/10 02:23 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
tulips are emerging from the soil with this warmer weather


The chives in my lawn are doing very well, and my Autumn crocus are shooting up.
Posted by: ANAMCHARA

Re: Gardening forum - 03/23/10 09:09 AM

I noticed over the weekend that the garlic that I planted last year is coming up. My first experience growing garlic..Can't wait to see how it turns out.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/10 05:16 PM

did you plant any other items?
Posted by: ANAMCHARA

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/10 05:43 PM

Not this past fall...I didn't plant but a small patch of garlic only because I had no clue what I was doing. I'm very excited that they have actually sprouted..
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/26/10 10:45 AM

hope the cold spell does not harm them
Posted by: ANAMCHARA

Re: Gardening forum - 03/26/10 11:32 AM

Me too...I have them mulched..Hope that's enough...
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/10 09:48 AM

temp to rise to around 80 degrees by friday
Posted by: ANAMCHARA

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/10 11:07 AM

I can't wait...There's a lot of yard work to get done...
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/10 10:27 AM

consider last springs was cold and wet, the warmer weather will be inspiring
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 04/02/10 08:43 AM

Does anyone know...

All of those different kinds of tall grasses, can they be split up?

Also, I need ideas for a large rock garden. It is oval shaped (10ft deep, 15ft wide) with small rocks in front and large rocks (4ft diameter) in the back. It is raised, in the front it is about a foot above ground level and at the back it is about 3 feet above ground level. Anything too tall looks silly in it. Right now I have some small ornamental grasses, lamb's ear, creeping thyme, and some coneflowers that I don't think will grow back. I also have 3 hostas in there that I don't think go well. It gets full sun from mid-morning to mid-afternoon.
Posted by: tomwaits

Re: Gardening forum - 04/03/10 09:11 AM

Originally Posted By: ANAMCHARA
Me too...I have them mulched..Hope that's enough...

I don't think cold will hurt the garlic at all.
I put mine in fall no mulch & it always comes through fine,
only problem i have is sometimes squirrels dig it up & replant .
Posted by: Scottie2Hottie

Re: Gardening forum - 04/05/10 09:44 AM

Wooo hooooo! Got to start my spring yard cleaning this weekend!! Poop patrol, last of the leaves, and the downed branches gone as well as the lawn mowed! I also took down 2 birch trees that were half dead! Next step is renting a stump grinder then a tiller for the flower beds and gardens
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/05/10 10:42 PM

Sounds like your back surgery was very sucessful. Glad you are doing so well.
Posted by: Scottie2Hottie

Re: Gardening forum - 04/06/10 06:33 AM

YEs it was VERY successful and I am at a 40lb weight limit for the next 4 weeks...but I still try to stay way under it... I never let my back heal right in 1999 so thats why I went through this in 2009 and I DO NOT want to go through this again!

The only thing that holds me back now is my MS. When doing yard work I have to take frequent breaks so I don't get muscle cramps of over heated. I mow half the back yard, break, mow the rest of the back yard, break, then the front yard and break before I attempt anything else. Also the heat and humidity alone can wear me out. Last summer there were a couple days as soon as I stepped out side and the humidity hit me i could feel all my energy drain out of my body.... I was a very freakish feeling. However I have always said there is no such thing as *TOO HOT* and love it hot....I just have to take extra precautions now is all \:\) One oif my tricks is I soak a bandanna in ice water then wring it out and wear it on my head and it helps to keep me cool when it looses it's cool or dries out I just re-soak it and keep going \:\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/06/10 04:33 PM

Glad to hear you are doing well and know your limits. Best wishes for the future.
Posted by: Scottie2Hottie

Re: Gardening forum - 04/07/10 04:11 AM

Thanks Silver Fox! Last year it had me really depressed. One day i mowed the lawn and trimmed the hedges and for 3 days after I was extremely exhausted as well as had knots all over my arms from the muscle stiffness/spasm. I was very depressed and thinking I am only 38 years old.... I can NEVER do yard work again!!??!!?? I talked to the people on my MS forum and they gave me lots of tips and tricks to help me in the future. The hardest part of the disease was learning my limitations and SLOWING down. Also I learned is NOT good to go to a 13 hour outdoor concert with NO shade or seating! I can still go.... just not as long and more heat preparation. The concert venue allowed NO chairs, blankets, umbrellas etc etc because they could be used as weapons! \:\/ This year I am contacting the venue and radio station WELL in advance to get permission to bring my cane that also opens to a tiny stool like chair.
Posted by: Bryankees

Re: Gardening forum - 04/07/10 09:10 AM

Originally Posted By: Red22
Does anyone know...

All of those different kinds of tall grasses, can they be split up?

Also, I need ideas for a large rock garden. It is oval shaped (10ft deep, 15ft wide) with small rocks in front and large rocks (4ft diameter) in the back. It is raised, in the front it is about a foot above ground level and at the back it is about 3 feet above ground level. Anything too tall looks silly in it. Right now I have some small ornamental grasses, lamb's ear, creeping thyme, and some coneflowers that I don't think will grow back. I also have 3 hostas in there that I don't think go well. It gets full sun from mid-morning to mid-afternoon.


Took me a minute, I was thinking this sounds too familiar. But anyway.. Yes, the grass can be split. It's a huge root ball, you essentially just split them like you would a hosta and they will grow. I split them twice to fill up that bed. If you ever don't want it, let me know. I loved that grass.

The hosta grew fine in the rock garden, but the deer ate them all the time. We struggled each year to figure out what to plant out there. I was always thinking bunches of grass with some flowers, maybe even in pots, would have been nice.

The crawling vines near the house drove us crazy and I cut them down, mowed over them, dug them out, but they are still there..
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 04/09/10 11:58 PM

I don't mind the vines as much, except for that persistent trumpet vine mixed in with the clematis. As for the grasses, I will be splitting some up soon, we are going to plant some along that chain link fence that is falling apart to create more of a "natural" border.

That rock garden is tough, it has a lot of clay in it. Someone told me to try to just mix in some play sand. And of course the deer enjoyed the hostas last year. We were thinking maybe finding some slate and making tiered levels and plant some creeping types of plants.

When I dig up that grass would you like a couple sections? I will probably try to take one or two sections off of each .
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/10 05:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Red22
That rock garden is tough, it has a lot of clay in it. Someone told me to try to just mix in some play sand.



will you be planting there?
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 04/14/10 12:15 PM

Yes, I would like to plant more things in there. I guess I just don't have a very good vision for it.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/14/10 03:13 PM

if you will be planting there then the soil/clay will need to be loose for the plants to grow
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/10 10:46 PM

I have a lot of clay too and found that adding compost works very well.
Posted by: Hong Kong

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/10 06:24 AM

A tip I read from better house keeping. Instead of spending tons of money on fertilizer and lawn products, Spread epsom salt on your lawn just like fertilizer. Not only does it work great but it is environment, kid, and pet friendly! \:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/22/10 04:38 PM

peat moss to loosen it up?
Posted by: Bryankees

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/10 10:25 AM

absolutely.. that would be great! I've got a couple areas that I'd love to put grass that in.. let me know when you are planning it.. thanks!
Posted by: Bryankees

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/10 10:27 AM

and the tiered thing would be cool.. we had debating bringing fresh soil in to go over the top to do tiers or something similar, that's what we were considering doing some container gardening out there..
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/06/10 08:55 AM

with the price of food to rise it would be a good idea to plant a small garden
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/07/10 09:58 AM

I am already planning on a garden... Fortunately with this upcoming weekends weather i am soooooo glad i haven't planted anything yet!

I am growing
Cucumbers
Peas
Beets
Corn
and Zucchini

In my smaller garden I am growing
Bell and cherry peppers
Herbs (sage, parsley, etc.)
Tomatoes (early boys)
and Cherry Tomatoes

For my Deck flower boxes i will do SnapDragons again... I never heard of them before 2 years ago and I LOVE them!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/07/10 02:25 PM

you can start them inside and transplant later
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/26/10 09:19 AM

roses starting to bloom
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/26/10 05:33 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
you can start them inside and transplant later



Thats what I did 2 years ago and took great pride that I grew everything from scratch! This year I still wasn't sure if I was going to a garden or not until it was too late. I will just get my plants from the regional market.
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/26/10 05:41 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
roses starting to bloom


I love roses! I plan on visiting the rose garden here in SYracuse the 2nd week of june and taking pictures and putting on my website.... here is the link to some of the flower pics i took and made into black and white


http://www.s2hphotographicmemories.com/Other/Black-and-White-Photos/10473194_ogMtQ#726635317_oQHbc
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 05/26/10 05:45 PM

Wow I love #11...I would buy a print.
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 05:18 AM

Thanks Della! My favorite is #9 and it is awesome in a black and white matted frame. #12 I enlarged to an 8x10 and in full color... it is hung in the main office of my wife's work.

If you seriously want a pic of #11 let me know if you want it 4x6, 5x7, or 8x10 and if you want it as is or full color and I will send you one....FREE.....I have my own photo printer now, so my cost is almost non existent
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 05:32 AM

I'll take a look again tonight and decide, thanks!!
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 05:42 AM

You're welcome... be sure to check out the rest of my site as well.... I have some great sunrise and beach pics
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 06:03 PM

Has anyone seen eucalyptus around Geneva? I planted some a while back, but can't find any this year.

Also, I can't find Hungarian (hot banana) pepper plants. Anyone seen them?

Everything else edible is planted and growing, growing, growing. \:\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 07:38 PM

I get annoyed every time I think about the Jackson and Perkins Rose Gardens being removed to make way for an apartment complex. Those gardens were so beautiful and well cared for. Best of all, it was free admission. Great childhood memories of going for a ride to Newark on a sunny Sunday afternoon and wandering through the roses with Mother and Dad and then stopping for ice cream on the way home. Life was so simple then - at least for a little kid.
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 07:39 PM

Originally Posted By: twocats
Has anyone seen eucalyptus around Geneva? I planted some a while back, but can't find any this year.

Also, I can't find Hungarian (hot banana) pepper plants. Anyone seen them?

Everything else edible is planted and growing, growing, growing. \:\)


I got banana peppers at Cottrell's but I can't remember if they were hot or not but I got cayenne peppers there as well.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 05/27/10 07:51 PM

Thanks Della.
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/28/10 05:44 AM

Two Cats....If you really want a wide selection...take a road trip to the Regional Market on Saturday in Syracuse... there are tons and tons of vendors and you can find any flower or plant imaginable! Word of caution...get there EARLY they open at 7:00am but by 9:00am you can't find a parking spot and it is mass bedlam!
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 05/28/10 08:16 AM

Gracias S2h! Enjoy your weekend!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/04/10 08:37 AM

roses bloomin'
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 06/18/10 03:41 PM

lilies, daisies, snapdragons, ahhh sweet summer...
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 06/22/10 03:46 PM

Harvested a bunch of sugar snap peas today. \:\)
Posted by: heymom

Re: Gardening forum - 06/22/10 07:04 PM

The tomatoes are loving this humidity, as are the cukes!

I found some great tomato supports at Wal Mart this past weekend. The first tomato supports I've really been happy with! \:\)
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 06/22/10 07:10 PM

My garden is freaking me out everytime I go out to look at it!! I may have to open a veggie stand!
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 06/22/10 07:29 PM

"Garden Humongo" is doing extremely well!! Everything is up and looking great. Now, if I could just keep mama deer and baby fawn out of there, I think I'd have more corn \:\/
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/29/10 07:56 AM

flowers are blooming
sun forecast for the next few days
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/08/10 07:43 AM

need to keep the plants/flowers watered
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/08/10 06:24 PM

I have Japanese beetles. They were covered on my rose bushes and Rose of Sharon trees. Some of the leaves are almost totally eaten. I heard that the traps do catch a lot but also attract a lot more. Any other ideas.
Posted by: RedGreen

Re: Gardening forum - 07/08/10 06:45 PM

It's true, the traps actually attract more beatles thus is counter productive. The best thing is actually going out and removing them by hand. A mild soapy water spray from an atomiser will also work. Remove dead beatles from the area.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 07/08/10 06:48 PM

Sassy the traps do work but you should put them as far from your "tasty" plants as possible. I can't remember what the recommended distance is to still be effective but not attract more to your plants but I bet you can find that information online.
Posted by: zipdrive

Re: Gardening forum - 07/08/10 09:57 PM

One more thing about those traps.....They catch thousands of beetles, it's true, but the smell of them when the bag is full is just awful, and it's hard to get rid of. You can still smell it even if you wrap the bag tightly in two garbage bags all sealed up. I had to stop using them for that reason. I used Ortho Bug-Be-Gone. Works great on my purple sand cherries, which the beetles love.
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/10/10 10:15 PM

I heard about the smell. I did buy two traps and set one about 50 ft upwind from my rose of sharons and put one down about 30 ft from my tomatoe garden. They totally killed one rose bush, ate almost all the buds on one rose of sharon. The bags did collect a lot almost immediately, Matteroffact, as I was ripping the adhesive off the bait I had about 10 flying around me. Oh Redgreen I could not pick bugs off a plant, UGH!!!
What recommendations are there for disposing of the bags other than double bagging it. Nothing on the box.
Had a hard time finding the traps too. Walmart was out, Country Max had a hard plastic house type. And then when there were about 20 people asking about them, they said if we could wait a minute they were just unloading a pallet of them. I guess a lot of people are being bothered by them this year.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 07/12/10 06:44 PM

The most beautiful summer flower has arrived.

My personal favorite, glads: the colors, the stateliness, the bloom time all just make me say, "Wow."
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 07/13/10 05:56 AM

I am jealous of my neighbors wild flower patch she has in her front lawn.... so many colors, it BEAUTIFUL! My other favorite is SnapDragons very hearty!
Posted by: pepper

Re: Gardening forum - 07/13/10 08:57 AM

does anyone know how late in the season you can plant shrubs? I would like to plant some boxwoods but I want to make sure they have a chance to establish their roots before winter.
Posted by: zipdrive

Re: Gardening forum - 07/13/10 09:33 AM

You can safely plant shrubs well into the fall. I have planted lots of shrubs and trees in November and they have done fine. They're on sale that time of year. It's a matter of the plants getting a root system going before the ground freezes. Even though it may be colder they still need a lot of water though, like every day for the first week and then one deep watering weekly for a while. Then Mother Nature can take over.
Posted by: pepper

Re: Gardening forum - 07/13/10 10:18 AM

great. thanks zipdrive.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/13/10 03:48 PM

We just bought some shrubs at a late fall sale. Can we plant them now, or should we try to store them until spring? -Dee


Go ahead and plant them. Even though it’s late in the season, your shrubs will be happier in the ground than in pots. Ideally, trees and shrubs need about a month to establish roots before a heavy freeze, but it’s actually OK to plant them anytime the ground is workable, and many bare-root trees and shrubs are planted in very early spring while they’re still dormant.

I’ve planted well into December with success, though the plantings looked pretty pitiful until the weather warms up in the spring.

Here are a few tips for seeing your late-season plantings through the winter:

Avoid stimulating growth: Don’t fertilize or overly amend the soil. You can add a little compost and bone meal (to stimulate root growth), but hold off on fertilizer until spring.
Don’t disturb the plant: Avoid pruning, and be very gentle with the roots while planting. The shrub won’t have time to recover from damage, and it’s going to be stressed enough as it is.
Keep plants watered: The worst part of cold damage is caused by desiccation, or drying out. Keep new shrubs watered every week or two until the ground freezes, and especially right before a heavy freeze.
Watch out for frost heaving: Make sure the plants stay firmly plants when the ground freezes.
Apply Mulch: Add mulch to keep newly planted shrubs insulated. If you’re planting cold-sensitive trees or shrubs, you can add extra protection by wrapping or banking the plants with burlap or leaves on cold nights. Be sure to uncover in the morning.
If the ground is frozen solid and unworkable, you can store unplanted shrubs in a sheltered spot with a southern exposure. Bank with leaves or mulch to keep them insulated and water every few days. When growth starts in early spring, prune away any damaged branches, shape up your plants, feed with a balanced organic fertilizer, and they should recover nicely.

Further Information
How to Protect Your Garden from Frost and Freeze
When to Water Plants Before a Freeze
How to Plant Container Grown Shrubs
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/16/10 12:02 PM

lilies blooming
Posted by: Cinnamon

Re: Gardening forum - 07/16/10 08:42 PM

lilies bloomed a long time agoand have already died off. Glads blooming now.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/16/10 11:32 PM

My day lilies are still going strong.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/17/10 09:13 AM

they will be loving the sun we are supposed to be getting
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/17/10 12:00 PM

They are on the east side and in full morning to mid-day sun.
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/17/10 02:59 PM

My day lilies did not bloom at all this year. Only got leaves. I guess they need to be pulled up and seperated? In the meantime, yesterday I got another gorgeous Asian lily on clearance at Lowes for $4, and a delphinium for $2.
I've been picking zucchini and have several peppers that are quite large but are still firmly anchored on the stem. Isn't it best to wait and pick when they easily pull off stem?
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 04:32 AM

How is I it wander my flower garden daily, deadheading and weeding but missed a weed that managed to grow to a height of no less than 4 ft? LOL!!! WOW!
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 07:44 AM

It's like they are weeds on steroids this year
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 08:43 AM

Originally Posted By: Roadtrip2nowhere
but missed a weed that managed to grow to a height of no less than 4 ft? LOL!!! WOW!


musta thought it was a plant
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 08:44 AM

Originally Posted By: sassyone
Isn't it best to wait and pick when they easily pull off stem?


pick them as you need them
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 09:03 AM

Then I better go pick them. I was worried 4 legged creatures would start taking bites of them before I got a chance to pick them.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 09:26 AM

if you wait then all the plants may need to be picked around the same time
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/10 06:10 PM

It's a great year for peppers. Mine are better than ever.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 07/19/10 10:57 AM

Originally Posted By: Roadtrip2nowhere
How is I it wander my flower garden daily, deadheading and weeding but missed a weed that managed to grow to a height of no less than 4 ft? LOL!!! WOW!


Good question. Invisibility cloak?
Posted by: ovidtech

Re: Gardening forum - 07/19/10 03:15 PM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Originally Posted By: Roadtrip2nowhere
How is I it wander my flower garden daily, deadheading and weeding but missed a weed that managed to grow to a height of no less than 4 ft? LOL!!! WOW!


Good question. Invisibility cloak?


You don't have an herb garden also do you ?
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 07/19/10 05:06 PM

No herb garden...that would be just another chore to add to the ever growing list of things I need to take care of!
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 07/20/10 08:49 AM

Does anyone know, will bee balm flower a second time? Mine are all done and they look terrible.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/20/10 10:59 AM

http://www.garden.org/plantguide/?q=show&id=2037

Bee Balm

Bee balm flowers are brilliant additions to late-summer herb gardens and flower borders. Butterflies, hummingbirds, bees, and other nectar-seeking creatures covet the tubular flowers on the plant's rounded flower heads, and the leaves and flowers can also be made into tea. Other common names include horsemint, wild bergamot, and Oswego tea.
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 07/20/10 11:39 AM

Mine have never bloomed more than once. Maybe a few strays after the initial flush but definitely not a re-bloom.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/20/10 11:52 AM

I don't have any so all I know is what I found on the internet. There were several references on google. They look nice I may try and find some for next year. They sound like they multiply like lillies.
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 07/20/10 11:59 AM

Yeah def only get a couple plants because you'll have more than enough in a year or 2. \:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/23/10 09:19 AM

rain is helping the plants
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 07/23/10 11:17 AM

I know I think you can sit and watch them grow!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/27/10 08:30 AM

sun this week


Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 07/29/10 05:37 AM

Can't wait to get my hands on some of Muller's corn on Saturday!!! MMMMmmmmmm besides Davin's in Avon....definitely the best corn i ever had and it is consitant year after year MMMMMmmmmm also both places use NO pesticides.... Shuck the corn there...any bugs or such and toss them in the bucket to the side. However, rarely do I find any bad ones
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 07/29/10 06:19 AM

I was out last night harvesting some broccoli and noticed that if all my tomatoes ripen at the same time, I'm in trouble! The plants are seriously tall this year!
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 07/29/10 07:12 PM

I have the same problem with peppers!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/30/10 03:54 PM

usually share it with the family/neighbors
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/07/10 08:46 AM

I noticed a web link on front page of FL1 today about the yellow orb spider. There is a picture of it. It is the sme exact spider that has been in my garden or on my hostas every year. They are awful looking but I found they are not dangerous to humans. I just wouldn't want to find one on me.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/09/10 06:30 AM

I've been picking a lot of cukes & broccoli, and I noticed last night that I probably will be picking beans by the end of the week.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/10/10 09:32 AM

Tomatoes, tomatoes, tomatoes.
Glorious tomatoes.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/11/10 06:12 AM

Beans, beans, beans!

I picked over a dozen tomatoes last night and only 1/2 of them were any good. They have this black spot on the bottom and it looks like they are rotten, even though they were not sitting on the ground!?? Is this the blight that everyone had last year?
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/11/10 06:48 AM

I think it
is called blossom end rot. It don't know what causes it or what to do about it though.
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/11/10 09:54 AM

there was an article in last Sundays D&C that said the potato and tomatoe blight are back,but not as bad as last year.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/11/10 03:42 PM

my plants have blight, but are LOADED with red and orange tomatoes, so i'll still have a great harvest-albeit a short harvest.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/12/10 06:59 AM

My plants are loaded as well--I think we're kinda in the same situation, lol. What does blight look like?
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/12/10 09:19 AM

http://www.hort.cornell.edu/department/Facilities/lihrec/vegpath/photos/lateblight_tomato.htm
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/13/10 07:49 AM

hot and humid weather may not have helped
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/14/10 10:33 AM

Tomatoes thrive during hot & humid weather.

Thanks for the links Sass \:\)
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/14/10 10:37 AM

Nope, it's not blight that we have.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/14/10 07:05 PM

Yeah, it sounds like this:

http://gardening.about.com/od/vegetablepatch/f/BlossomEndRot.htm

OTOH, there's always the possibility that someone put a curse on LOTE's tomatoes.
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 08/14/10 07:21 PM

My tomatoes have blight : I think it was my improper care. I'm not a tomato fan so I really didn't mess with them at all. I chalk it up to my learning curve. I did get lots of cherry tomatoes, cayenne peppers and squash but I dropped the ball with the cukes and tomatoes.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/14/10 09:38 PM

Quite possibly a cuke and tomato curse.
Posted by: RedGreen

Re: Gardening forum - 08/14/10 10:04 PM

Seriously, cukes grow themselves. You stick a 1" plant in the ground in May, and in August it's 25' long with a crapload of cukes all over it.And you should have already picked a ton. Multiply by 6-12 plants and they can take over a very large area.
Tomatos need a little tendering to, not much really just staking and keeping heavy branches off the ground. Cherry tomatos are the bomb though and are much easier to grow. Everybody should have gone through like 4-5 passes of green and wax beans by now, which I can eat every night. You plant these every week for like 6 weeks starting mid May. You have a never ending supply, and tons to freeze. Been a GREAT year for sweet corn, I'm freezing a bunch on the cob for winter.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 11:18 AM

I'm not sure when your garden was planted, rg, but mine was planted late May. I have 3 cuke plants that are yielding approx 6 cukes per week---is that considered a crapload? It's certainly enough for us, but I wouldn't call it a crapload. 4-5 passes of green beans? Try 2 so far. Probably more out there today, but since it's raining, they'll wait till tomorrow. We stagger beans and corn--which, btw, isn't ready to pick yet. So far I've frozen broccoli, snap peas and a few bags of green beans. I've never had good luck freezing corn on the cob---it's very watery tasting. I process them on the cob but, take my electric knife and cut off the kernels to freeze. Let me know how yours turns out.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 11:21 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Yeah, it sounds like this:

http://gardening.about.com/od/vegetablepatch/f/BlossomEndRot.htm

OTOH, there's always the possibility that someone put a curse on LOTE's tomatoes.


My tomatoes do resemble the pic. If you try to cut the bad part out, the inside of the tomato is covered in what seems to be something moldy. So, you can't even cut the bad parts out and salvage the good.
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 11:22 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Quite possibly a cuke and tomato curse.


Yes that's it!! someone cursed us!
Posted by: RedGreen

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 11:25 AM

I don't have a garden this year. With moving (twice) it just wasn't possible. I'm speaking from past experiences. 6 cukes a week is a lot IMO, I grew them for someone else I don't eat them myself yack. I used to plant green and yellow beans every 2 weeks. They are ready quickly,less than 60 days. Maybe my statement of 5 rounds was a tad high, but it always seemed to me I had far too many all summer long.
Looking forward to a nice garden next year, got lots of room out back.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 11:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Della
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Quite possibly a cuke and tomato curse.


Yes that's it!! someone cursed us!


Well, damn them!!
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 11:29 AM

Someone prolly has little tomato voodoo dolls!
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 06:21 PM

I have pumpkins, didn't even plant any. My peppers did not do well at all.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 06:57 PM

I had an unplanted 'pumpkin patch' last year. They turned out to be small gourds. Enjoy it! \:\)
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 07:19 PM

The same people who make the tomato voodoo dolls also shrink the pumpkins. On Halloween, they turn into shrunken heads.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 07:42 PM

So that was YOU in my pumpkin patch last October!
Were you waiting for the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/10 09:17 PM

I was just doing some stalking. I'm a retired stalker now, but I used to do quite a bit of it.
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/16/10 08:37 AM

Hmm, maybe they are gourds. Do Pumpkins start out dark green? I only see 1 dark green pumpkin (or gourd).
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/16/10 08:55 AM

pumpkins DO start out as dark green.

Mystery plantings-always fun! \:\)
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/16/10 05:05 PM

Well hopefully my lawn mower man wont hit it with the mower, since it is not in the garden, but just outside the garden.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/16/10 08:43 PM

Did you mark it with stakes and string, or are you going the wishful thinking and blind luck route? Perhaps a pumpkin salvation prayer?
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/17/10 08:07 AM

No i didnt mark it, but thats a good idea,
Posted by: Spanky

Re: Gardening forum - 08/17/10 09:24 PM

Call Charlie Brown to watch it for you.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 08/17/10 09:49 PM

That would be Linus.
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/18/10 05:56 AM

The curse on my tomatoes seems to have been lifted, lol. I am up to my ears in tomatoes and green beans!!
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 08/19/10 06:32 AM

I haven't used my mini garden in 2 years and now I have 3 cherry pepper plants growing they started out of NOWHERE!!! Lucky me!! \:\)
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/19/10 07:10 AM

Ode To Tomatoes by Pablo Neruda
The street
filled with tomatoes,
midday,
summer,
light is
halved
like
a
tomato,
its juice
runs
through the streets.
In December,
unabated,
the tomato
invades
the kitchen,
it enters at lunchtime,
takes
its ease
on countertops,
among glasses,
butter dishes,
blue saltcellars.
It sheds
its own light,
benign majesty.
Unfortunately, we must
murder it:
the knife
sinks
into living flesh,
red
viscera
a cool
sun,
profound,
inexhaustible,
populates the salads
of Chile,
happily, it is wed
to the clear onion,
and to celebrate the union
we
pour
oil,
essential
child of the olive,
onto its halved hemispheres,
pepper
adds
its fragrance,
salt, its magnetism;
it is the wedding
of the day,
parsley
hoists
its flag,
potatoes
bubble vigorously,
the aroma
of the roast
knocks
at the door,
it's time!
come on!
and, on
the table, at the midpoint
of summer,
the tomato,
star of earth, recurrent
and fertile
star,
displays
its convolutions,
its canals,
its remarkable amplitude
and abundance,
no pit,
no husk,
no leaves or thorns,
the tomato offers
its gift
of fiery color
and cool completeness
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/19/10 09:47 AM

Originally Posted By: s2hphoto.com
I haven't used my mini garden in 2 years and now I have 3 cherry pepper plants growing they started out of NOWHERE!!! Lucky me!! \:\)


I have a tomato plant growing in my stone patio. Didn't plant it there, never had a garden there. There is a layer of stone, sand, & black silt fabric over the dirt, but it somehow made it's way through all that and it's a big plant with flowers on it, lol.
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/19/10 11:35 AM

wow, thats amazing.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/20/10 08:11 AM

Originally Posted By: ~livinontheedge~
Didn't plant it there, never had a garden there.


animals or birds
Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 08/21/10 02:21 PM

Maybe so, but it must have been able to travel through hell & high water in order to root.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/23/10 10:34 AM

have had maple tree seeds sprout when only in mulch
hardy little buggers
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/10 04:59 AM

I have no maple trees on my property but i am surrounded by them.... I HATE all the leaves but I have about 100 seedlings surrounding my property and the more I pull them 2-3 more take their place! GRRRRRrrrrrrrr
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/10 07:11 AM

ditto
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/10 12:01 PM

Originally Posted By: s2hphoto.com
I have no maple trees on my property


did the neighbor mow her lawn yet?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/10 09:14 AM

leaves are falling
long cold winter?
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/10 04:31 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: s2hphoto.com
I have no maple trees on my property


did the neighbor mow her lawn yet?


NO! Thats why I am allowing the seedlings along my fence to grow.... they are about 12 feet high now and covered in leaves and works PERFECTLY to block the view of her back yard..... However when my parents came to visit at the end of July they got to witness her cutting her grass with scissors. The grass is so high in the back yard she needs a brush hog....but instead she scissors and doesn't get much accomplished \:\/

I was a good neighbor and offered to help or to lend out my weed wacker and mower and each time she rudely declined...so i am done offering....now she will just have to answer to the city !
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/10 04:33 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
leaves are falling
long cold winter?


I noticed that too!!! We are not even out of August yet and I had the heater on in the car yesterday morning when i went to the store at 5am BRRRRRRRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr If it's starting to do this in AUGUST what will September and October be like!
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/10 08:34 AM

record mildest winter...


eternal optimist?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/10 02:56 PM

time will tell

4 or 5 hurricanes coming from the ocean
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/10 03:18 PM

FYI Farmer's Almanac predicted an early Spring for 2010.



Frigid 2010 Forecast: How cold will this winter be?


Old Man Winter doesn’t want to give up his frigid hold just yet, but his hold will mostly be in the middle of the country.

According to the 2010 Farmers’ Almanac, this winter will see more days of shivery conditions: a winter during which temperatures will average below normal for about three-quarters of the nation.

A large area of numbingly cold temperatures will predominate from roughly east of the Continental Divide to west of the Appalachians (see map). The coldest temperatures will be over the northern Great Lakes and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. But acting almost like the bread of a sandwich, to this swath of unseasonable cold will be two regions with temperatures that will average closer to normal—theWest Coast and the East Coast.

What about snow/rain/ice?

Near-normal amounts of precipitation are expected over the eastern third of the country, as well as over the Pacific Northwest and Northern Plains, while drier-than-normal conditions are forecast to occur over the Southwest and the Upper Midwest/Great Lakes.

Only the Central and Southern Plains are expected to receive above-average amounts of precipitation.

Blizzards?

While three-quarters of the country is predicted to see near- or below average precipitation this winter, that doesn’t mean there won’t be any winter storms! On the contrary, significant snowfalls are forecast for parts of every zone. For the Middle Atlantic and Northeast States, for instance, we are predicting a major snowfall in mid-February; possibly even blizzard conditions for New England (indeed, even shovelry is not dead).

What about spring and summer?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/03/10 11:53 AM

Originally Posted By: twocats
What about spring and summer?


2011
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/29/10 06:46 AM

Originally Posted By: twocats


Frigid 2010 Forecast: How cold will this winter be?



may have frost next monday
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/18/10 01:56 PM

hybrid roses blooming better now compared to during the summer months
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 10/18/10 05:45 PM

Chinese lanterns are in full bloom here.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/19/10 07:49 AM

the cooler weather/rain seems to help
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 10/20/10 01:34 AM

2 years ago my snapdragons bloomed well into November and even though I gutted the flower box 3 returned first thing the next spring \:\) I definitely have to back into flowers for spring 2011...my deck/backyard area was not my normal tranquil place this year \:\(
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/20/10 07:40 AM

Originally Posted By: s2hphoto.com
...my deck/backyard area was not my normal tranquil place this year \:\(


just admire the neighbors weed garden....lol
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 10/20/10 03:50 PM

My trees were perfect height this year and with the leaves blocked her yard perfectly \:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/20/10 04:36 PM

until the leaves fall off
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 10/20/10 06:38 PM

The leaves had already started falling ....but by the time they are gone...it will be too cold to relax on the deck
Posted by: tomwaits

Re: Gardening forum - 10/21/10 05:14 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: s2hphoto.com
...my deck/backyard area was not my normal tranquil place this year \:\(


just admire the neighbors weed garden....lol

My grandfather always said "Any Fool Can Plant A Garden "
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/29/10 12:40 PM

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/11 03:04 PM

think spring
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/11 04:42 PM

I am. I want leaves on the trees, grass to mow and flowers. Lots, and lots of flowers.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/11 09:16 AM

we agree
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 01/30/11 09:54 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I am. I want leaves on the trees, grass to mow and flowers. Lots, and lots of flowers.


http://www.ecuador-images.net/flower.htm
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/31/11 11:02 AM

screensaver ;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/11 11:58 AM

warmer weather ... ;\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/08/11 10:04 AM

I want flowers,green leafy trees and green grass - now! Of course, I would settle for a muddy lawn at this point.
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 03/09/11 04:58 AM

This was taken last Tuesday at my parents...will this help SF???

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/09/11 07:12 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Of course, I would settle for a muddy lawn at this point.


rain coming
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/09/11 11:21 AM

Very nice try Scottie and I thank you. It is my yard that I want to be in bloom.

I wanted the muddy yard to be from melted snow but spring showers will have to do.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/10/11 07:17 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I wanted the muddy yard to be from melted snow but spring showers will have to do.


weather person is saying there may be flooding \:\(
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/10/11 10:59 AM

My back yard used to flood knee deep like a mini lake until the neighboring property fixed their drainage problems and stopped flooding me. Thank God their drainage is no longer recycled through my cellar and sump pump. Guess they got tired of my bitching about it.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/11 07:22 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Thank God their drainage is no longer recycled through my cellar and sump pump.


send them your electric bill
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/11 12:22 PM

It was either keep the sump running almost continuously or have the cellar destroyed completely. But they finally got the message that it was not legal for them to keep flooding me. They corrected the grading and installed proper drains. Problem solved - after about 4 years of bitching.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/11 04:04 PM

Daffodils are UP! \:\)
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/11 01:43 AM

WHERE!!!??!!!?? mine are still covered by the 18 inches of snow we got Sunday/Monday \:\( \:\( LOL
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/11 08:30 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
They corrected the grading and installed proper drains. Problem solved - after about 4 years of bitching.


was it mainly due from water coming out of the downspouts or a combination of conditons?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/11 11:55 AM

The neighboring property was an unpaved large parking lot that had been graded wrong over the years causing it to drain into my yard. At times I would end up with a small pond covering a large area of my yard with about 2-3 ft. of water. The water table is very high here to begin with and the extra drainage made it impossible to pump it out of my cellar. My sump was just continuously recycling the water into the saturated yard and then it would run back into my cellar - a vicious continuous cycle during heavy rains or melting snow. After 5 years of confronting them about it, they finally did major reconstruction. They regraded the entire lot, installed drain pipes and covered the area with a layer of crushed stone. The most I have had since then is a large puddle in a low spot and no more flooded basement. Before if the sump failed I could get 6-8 inches of water in the cellar (aprox 24' by 24' area) in 2-3 hours and had to call the fire dept. for pump out. Fortunately, we have only lost power here 2 or 3 times in the 8 years I have lived here.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/11 12:21 PM

thought the water was from a neighbors home
sounds like it was a mess
hope you did not have damage to any appliances/items in the cellar
good that they fixed it
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/11 07:07 PM

No damage Thank God. It did get high enough one time to put out the pilot light on the hot water heater and the heater is up on a cement pad.

I had talked to county officials and was very close to starting legal action when they decided to fix it. Water was from a social club with a large parking area.
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/11 07:26 PM

OK.....saw some lovely summer bulbs at Lowes today..NOW I am ready to pack away my snowshoes and wish for spring like everyone else! (be warned every year I put them away we get another "snow event") just sayin'!!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/11 10:10 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I had talked to county officials and was very close to starting legal action when they decided to fix it.


it must have keep you up at night worrying about the water before they fixed it
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/11 07:46 PM

Yes, I sleep much better now.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/11 09:29 AM

hope water did not cause any damage to your basement walls
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/11 11:33 AM

Me too. The previous owner had "water proofed" the walls of the basement - looked great when I bought the house. No "flood" problem listed in the seller's disclosure. None detected by the contractor that did the inspection. During the worst of the water problems it began to break down the water proofing and seep into the cellar. Even I know that sealing the inside of the cellar walls is the wrong way to fix water problems. Doing that can trap the water in the foundation and the freezing and thawing can damage the foundation. Time will tell but I think there will be foundation repairs in the future. Yes, there was legal action against the previous owner for improper disclosure. The seller would have been better off to forfeit the $300 penalty than to do an improper disclosure. ;\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/11 11:38 AM

BTW, the sun is shinning, the temperatue is rising, I see my muddy yard, I heard a large flock of geese flying over this morning.
Posted by: Harleybobb

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/11 03:38 PM

good luck.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/11 05:42 PM

Now the lilies are poking through the ground--ohboy, ohboy, ohboy!
It's here! The next 6 months are glorious!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/11 08:35 AM

snow covered
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/11 11:01 AM

All right, where the heck did my muddy yard go? Mother Nature is a five letter word that starts with a large "B"!
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/11 03:46 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
All right, where the heck did my muddy yard go? Mother Nature is a five letter word that starts with a large "B"!


HAHAHA!!! \:D
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/25/11 07:39 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
All right, where the heck did my muddy yard go?


turned into a small ice rink
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/25/11 11:50 AM

No. Just a big white snow bank. Guess I should be thankful that it melted off the driveway with no help from me.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/11 09:19 AM

wish it would warm up
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/11 01:37 PM

Anyone have any spring flower trying to come up? We have one lone tulip \:\)
I will be dividing my purple cone flowers this srping if anyone is interested! AND.....blackeyed susans...have PLENTY of those!!!
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/11 03:50 PM

I have LOTS of daffodils about 4 inches high, and my purple and yellow crocuses are in full bloom. \:\)
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/11 03:54 PM

My crocuses in bloom.
[img]http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2...5380647&theater[/img]
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 03/29/11 04:47 PM

couldn't get the photo to come up but it sounds beautiful!! \:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/11 09:43 AM

Originally Posted By: Roadtrip2nowhere
Anyone have any spring flower trying to come up?


snow covered
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/11 05:59 PM

Hellebores are shooting up!
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/11 07:23 PM

Daylilies have little green shoots starting.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/11 05:50 PM

hope they survive these cooler temps
Posted by: Icebar

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/11 06:09 PM

For my own picket fence, I just bought 1 section, cut it up and stuck the pieces in the ground at 3 foot intervals. I water it frequently. Hope it grows into a beautiful big fence soon.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/11 08:02 AM

tell us how it works out
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/11 11:37 AM

The daylilies continue to grow and green up. Wish it would warm up enough and wind stop blowing so strong so I can get out side and start getting things cleaned up. The Passion Flower Vines arrived two days ago and need to get planted.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/11 02:37 PM

it is some strange weather we have been having
hopefully it will improve
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/11 03:07 PM

Last year I bought my wife a hyacinth plant (my wife's favorite) after it died she planted it in the back yard... by weekend it should be in full bloom \:\)
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/11 05:19 PM

I have a row of hyacinths by my porch. Last year I sat out there almost every day to smell them. This year, I haven't sat out there once-too cold. \:\(
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/11 02:50 AM

I had my doubts.... but PROOF spring is really gonna happen. Here is my Lilac bush

Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/11 02:53 AM

here is the Hyacinth

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/11 11:16 AM

may have a slight dusting of snow after today
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/11 11:19 PM

It snowed a little in Dryden Thurs, a little before noon.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/22/11 07:48 AM

darn groundhog prediction was off
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/27/11 09:22 AM

plants will thrive on this rainwater
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/27/11 09:31 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I had talked to county officials and was very close to starting legal action when they decided to fix it. Water was from a social club with a large parking area.



any problems with all the rain?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/27/11 11:07 AM

Not for me but they have a very large puddle in the middle of their parking lot. People can't park there because they would be ankle deep in the puddle when they step out of their car.

Better there than knee deep in my back yard. ;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/27/11 01:51 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Better there than knee deep in my back yard. ;\)


I agree

did your sump pump run non-stop?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/27/11 07:09 PM

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/29/11 09:15 AM

hope to see more sun to let the ground dry
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/29/11 10:55 AM

I hate the strong winds but that should help dry up some of the water too.

Yes the sump pump is quiet most of the time. I seem to just get a little water seeping in and running across the floor as opposed to the previous rising water basement flooding.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/02/11 12:54 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Yes the sump pump is quiet most of the time.


that is good news

hope the sun comes out
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/02/11 06:06 PM

The new riding mower and I got acquainted Saturday while the lawn was dry enough to mow.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 05/02/11 06:23 PM

Tulips and daffodils and hyacinths, oh my! Sure would like to sit outside and enjoy the sight of them.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/02/11 06:25 PM

Yeah...if this keeps up I'll give up and just grow water chestnuts...
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/05/11 08:46 AM

or rice
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/05/11 08:46 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
The new riding mower and I got acquainted Saturday while the lawn was dry enough to mow.


what brand?
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/05/11 09:06 AM

My lilacs are starting to bloom like wild fire Can't wait till they are in full bloom and a gentle spring breeze, I have a window right near the lilac's and it makes the house smell wonderful! \:\)
Posted by: tomwaits

Re: Gardening forum - 05/05/11 09:58 AM

Cut first asparagus yesterday.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/05/11 10:26 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: SilverFox
The new riding mower and I got acquainted Saturday while the lawn was dry enough to mow.


what brand?


Troybuilt Bronco
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/05/11 10:27 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: SilverFox
The new riding mower and I got acquainted Saturday while the lawn was dry enough to mow.


what brand?


Troybuilt Bronco
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/06/11 08:25 AM

first riding mower for you?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/06/11 08:45 AM

No, I replaced an 8 yr. old Bolens that was not a step-thru style. Got the step thru because I thought it would be easier after knee surgeries. The other reason to replace the Bolens was because someone threw something in my yard and I didn't see it but I sure felt it. That resulted in a bent shaft.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/06/11 08:55 AM

riding mowers sure make cutting the yard easier ;\)
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/06/11 07:47 PM

I just got a new rider...it goes "BAaaa!"...

Seriously, I've got an '84 JD 318...runs like a champ. I've bladed any number of solid objects, and I think the belt drive to the mower, with the "give" (stretch/slip?) it has when it hits something solid is one reason it's still running well.

Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/06/11 08:14 PM

The Bolens was their cheapest model and was not very easy to get on and off. My son hated it because his knees were just about under his chin when he used it. All in all I was glad to see it go. A JD that old is probably better than any new mower today. Nothing is made as good as it used to be made. Lowes carries a low grade JD and it was made with a plastic outer shell.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/10/11 09:31 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
That resulted in a bent shaft.


it could have been removed and straigthened
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/10/11 11:38 AM

I know. But that wouldn't have solved the other issues I had with it. It was time to get a step-thru model.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 07:54 AM

I agree
make sure the new one does not get bent

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 07:57 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Lowes carries a low grade JD and it was made with a plastic outer shell.


lighter and cheaper to make
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 07:58 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Seriously, I've got an '84 JD 318..


replace any parts on it?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 08:51 AM

I have already advised the ajoining property to ask their members to stop tossing bottles, etc. in my yard. I asked nicely. Now if I find it continuing, nice is all used up and my nasty side will appear. Trust me, it won't be pretty. My bark is definitely not worse than my bite. ;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 01:58 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I have already advised the ajoining property to ask their members to stop tossing bottles, etc. in my yard.


now I understand where it came from

what if they installed a 6 foot stockade fence
would that help?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 04:01 PM

There was one when I bought the place. It rotted and started to fall apart. They claimed it was my fence. I thought it was theirs for the privacy of their people. At one point I offered to provide the materials if their men could install it. No deal. Wouldn't have helped that much anyway. Things used to get thrown over the fence worse than they have since the fence came down.

Had one person drive through the stockade fence. Next day the husband came to the door and said he would repair the damage. I said "no problem". By the time he left both of us were laughing about it. Seems his wife insisted he was too drunk to drive. So she started out of the parking lot with the wheels turned to go out the drive way and she forgot to straigthen the wheels and drove in a half circle going throught the 6ft. stockade fence. He told her thanks alot. If he wanted his pickup truck dented he would have done it himself. He came to the door because she was afraid I was going to be mad. I told him to have some fun with her. Tell her that I was mad as hell and had already called the troopers and there was a warrant out for who ever hit the fence.

I'm pretty easy going until I get pushed too far. He fixed the problem and that was the end of it.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 04:15 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Seriously, I've got an '84 JD 318..


replace any parts on it?


I changed the points once...otherwise, just oil and filters.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 04:34 PM

Quote:
Lowes carries a low grade JD and it was made with a plastic outer shell.


Mine has a fiberglass hood...otherwise, all metal. It's a lawn and garden tractor, with a heavy frame. Still a nice unit...hydrostatic belly mower and front attachment lifts and wheel drive. Opposed twin...they're inherently balanced. Air cooled, but with a fan-cooled oil cooler, and the fan also sucks air through the cylinder head shrouds. Automotive-sized oil filter. Only 18 hp, but 43 ci, so it's pretty torquey; I don't have to run it that hard. The mower lift goes up to about 5" for really high grass. Power steering, and separate wheel brakes. Chains, bar tires, and wheel weights. I've got a 48" mower and a 53" snow blower.

I recommend that model to anyone who's looking for a good used tractor.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/11 05:34 PM

A good used JD is probably better made than the new ones today.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/12/11 08:50 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Things used to get thrown over the fence worse than they have since the fence came down.


does the business have an outside surveillance system?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/12/11 08:51 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Tell her that I was mad as hell and had already called the troopers and there was a warrant out for who ever hit the fence.


;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/12/11 08:52 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Seriously, I've got an '84 JD 318..


replace any parts on it?


I changed the points once...otherwise, just oil and filters.


built like a tank
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/12/11 08:53 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
It's a lawn and garden tractor, with a heavy frame. Still a nice unit...hydrostatic belly mower and front attachment lifts and wheel drive. Opposed twin...they're inherently balanced. Air cooled, but with a fan-cooled oil cooler, and the fan also sucks air through the cylinder head shrouds. Automotive-sized oil filter. Only 18 hp, but 43 ci, so it's pretty torquey; I don't have to run it that hard. The mower lift goes up to about 5" for really high grass. Power steering, and separate wheel brakes. Chains, bar tires, and wheel weights. I've got a 48" mower and a 53" snow blower.


no cup holder?
lol
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/12/11 11:18 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Things used to get thrown over the fence worse than they have since the fence came down.


does the business have an outside surveillance system?


No, it is a social club. One of the members lives next door and is constantly picking up tossed trash and putting in complaints for both of us. \:\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/12/11 11:19 AM

For the record - mine has a cup holder. \:D
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/13/11 11:26 PM

Quote:
no cup holder?


It has a can holder.
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 05/14/11 02:35 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
For the record - mine has a cup holder. \:D


I don't need no stinkin cup holder LOL

Posted by: Yetta Nother

Re: Gardening forum - 05/18/11 01:39 PM

Originally Posted By: Roadtrip2nowhere
Anyone have any spring flower trying to come up? We have one lone tulip \:\)
I will be dividing my purple cone flowers this srping if anyone is interested! AND.....blackeyed susans...have PLENTY of those!!!


I love blackeyed susans!
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 05/19/11 02:21 PM

If you need/want some let me know!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/20/11 07:16 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Things used to get thrown over the fence worse than they have since the fence came down.


does the business have an outside surveillance system?


No, it is a social club. One of the members lives next door and is constantly picking up tossed trash and putting in complaints for both of us. \:\)


hope it gets resolved
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/24/11 06:37 AM

TUSCALOOSA | If you've been yanking on the starter cord of your lawn mower only to hear it sputter, the problem may start with the fuel you are putting into it.

Mechanics at local small- engine repair shops say ethanol is to blame.

Benjamin Mallisham, owner of Mallisham's Lawn Mower Repair on 13th Avenue East, said he's seen a steady increase in the number of engines damaged by the effects of ethanol.

'About one out of every five or six motors that come in here, that's the problem,' said Mallisham, who has been repairing lawn mowers and other small engines since 1974. 'It's getting worse now, but it got real bad about two years ago.'

Mallisham and Charlie Singley, owner of Singley Small Engine & Equipment on Greensboro Avenue, both said they have seen poorer grades of gasoline since the hurricanes of 2005 devastated the oil refineries along the Gulf Coast.

Couple that with the infusion of ethanol, part of the federal government's mandate to steadily use more biofuels over the next 14 years, and small engines — often called utility engines — are suffering.

'If it's a two-cycle engine with a diaphragm in the carburetor, the parts get stiff,' Singley said.

Gasoline blended with ethanol has become more common because a 2005 federal law requires an increase in the use of renewable biofuels from the 2004 level of about 4 billion gallons a year to 36 billion gallons by 2022.

Proponents of the alternative fuel claim it will help the U.S. become less reliant on foreign oil, provide additional security to the American farmer and be less polluting than fossil fuels.

The problem is that ethanol — a type of alcohol — is corrosive to plastic parts, especially those found in lawn mowers, chain saws, gas-powered weed trimmers and leaf blowers. At his shop, Mallisham displayed a carburetor with a quarter-sized hole that resembled the damage acid can do to certain materials. He said the hole was created by ethanol.

About the only recourse is to buy only as much gasoline as you can use quickly and mix in gasoline stabilizer, which is sold at almost every small engine repair shop.

During the off-season, Singley recommends keeping engines full of stabilizer-treated gasoline and running them occasionally throughout the winter.

But both Mallisham and Singley said that, at some point, the small rubber and plastic pieces within small engines will begin to falter because of the ethanol.

'It just eats them up,' Mallisham said.

Kenneth Midkiff, a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Alabama, said the introduction of ethanol has been a mixed blessing for utility engines.


However, 'ethanol has a somewhat corrosive effect on some plastics. It is possible that some parts of a lawn mower could be damaged,' Midkiff said.

Properly mixed, a 10 percent ethanol blend in gasoline should not hurt utility engines or their performance. The problem comes when a gas container sits in a garage for several months or a gas station does not properly maintain its tanks. This can result in ethanol separating from the gasoline, and the problem is worse if water gets mixed in.

Woods installed cut-off switches on the fuel lines of his mowers. He said the switch allows a carburetor to burn up all the gasoline in it once the gas tank runs empty, thereby slowing the corrosive effects of the ethanol.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/25/11 07:26 AM

seems like the grass needs to be mowed overy other day with all this rain

90 degrees next week
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/02/11 04:05 PM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Quote:
no cup holder?


It has a can holder.


or a keg holder

flowers are poppin' now
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 06/03/11 04:04 AM

My Iris's are in full bloom and already cut some rhubarb. I am sad my hyacinth and lilacs are gone already \:\(
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 06/03/11 06:05 AM

I know. I feel like I completely missed lilac season this year.
Irises look great, but I think my lilies are running behind.
Posted by: s2hphoto.com

Re: Gardening forum - 06/03/11 06:08 AM

Why is it the BEST smelling and Prettiest flowers IMO like lilacs and hyacinths last the shortest amount of time? \:\(
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/10/11 07:49 AM

roses are blooming
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/01/11 04:12 PM

warm november
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 12/01/11 04:16 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
roses are blooming


I've seen some still in bloom. \:\)
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 12/02/11 07:58 AM

I still had a few blossoms as of 11/30.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/02/11 07:55 PM

one weatherperson is prediction a milder winter this year
Posted by: sassyone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/05/11 07:19 AM

Hope that weather person is right. But what area is he predicting this for?
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 12/05/11 04:45 PM

Today Kevin Williams said he doesn't see any cold weather patterns becoming locked in for any length of time.
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 12/12/11 08:20 PM

98 Days until Spring. \:\) Gardening, a sunny thought for these dark days.



Organic Gardening 101 | How to Start an Organic Garden


Anthony Gucciardi
NaturalSociety
December 11, 2011

How to Start an Organic GardenOne great way to avoid the threat of genetically modified foods, pesticides, and toxic additives is to start your own organic garden. While the garden can be as large or small as you’d like, the benefit of knowing exactly how your food was prepared and therefore what is in it is worth the time and effort that goes into it. As you will soon find, it is actually relatively simple to begin your first organic gardening.
Organic Gardening Step 1: Planning Your Garden

Before you begin purchasing seeds and deciding on what you’d like to plant, you need to both establish goals for your garden as well as learn about how to effectively avoid low quality seeds and plants. Is your garden intended to feed you and your family for months at a time? If so, it still may be beneficial to start with a smaller garden at first to practice your technique. Regardless of the size, it is pertinent that you are using the right seeds. It is preferable that you purchase high quality certified organic seeds that are not genetically modified.

A number of sites exist that provide 100% organic, non-genetically altered seeds for thousands of different plant varieties. You can even find non-GMO seed packs on Amazon for fair prices. The great news is that once you’ve purchased your initial batch of seeds, you can simply utilize the seeds from your new plants in the future to plant more. As for the soil, you may also have to acquire some organic soil if your backyard does not already contain a compost pile or other high quality soil. If your backyard does contain high quality soil or compost, you can also opt to use it inside for your window sill potting plants.

Now it is time to determine what you’d like to grow. For your initiation into organic gardening, try one of the 10 plants considered to be the easiest to grow. Whether its on your window sill or out back, these 10 nutritious plants will most likely sprout right up without much of a challenge. These include:

Tomatoes
Pea shoots
Beetroot
Lettuce
Mint
Courgettes
Dwarf French Beans
Onions
Strawberries
Dwarf French Beans

Next up, it’s time to decide where you’d like to set your garden.
Organic Gardening Step 2: Setting Your Garden

Whether it’s in your window sill in a few small to large sized pots or your back yard, it’s time to analyze a few key factors when it comes to placing your garden. Keeping your size goals in mind, it’s time to determine the best place for your new organic garden. If it’s an herb or vegetable garden you’ve got in mind, you’ll need a site that gets at least six hours of sun per day. It is also important to make sure that wherever you place the plant offers sufficient draining abilities. If your prospective area receives a large quantity of rain that is not easily drained and rerouted, then that is less than optimal and you may want to consider changing the setting. Herbs and vegetables prefer well-drained soil. If it’s an ornamental bed, consider placing it where you can enjoy it from inside your house as well.

Once you have picked a site, observe it for a day for two. Examine how money hours of sun it gets on a daily basis, and the intensity of the sunshine. You can even test out the soil you are using with 3 simple tests.

To determine the type of soil you are working with, take a handful of moist soil from your garden, and give it a firm squeeze. Then, open your hand. One of three things will happen:

It will hold its shape, and when you gently poke it, it will crumble. This means you have optimal quality soil.
It will hold its shape, and, when poked, the soil still sits stubbornly in your hand. This indicates that you have clay-based soil.
It will fall apart as soon as you open your hand. This means you have sandy soil.

If the quality of your soil is poor, then you can either bring your gardening indoors or purchase some organic soil to augment your current soil.
Organic Gardening Step 3: Planting

Once you have your plants, dig a hole just as deep and at least twice as wide as the root ball of your plant. Place your plant in the prepared area, and backfill with the soil you just removed. Tamp it in, and make sure to water it thoroughly. A thoroughly watered root ball will help your plant adjust better to its new surroundings and help to avoid transplant shot.

After situating all of your plants, make sure that if you are outdoor gardening to give your entire garden a 3 inch thick later of organic mulch to prevent weeds while simultaneously retaining soil moisture. This can include shredded bark, hay, chopped leaves, or grass clippings.

Congratulations, you have completed your first course in organic gardening! More information, guides, and techniques will be release periodically to help you maintain your garden and utilize little-known tips to maximize production and quality without harsh chemicals.
Posted by: ANAMCHARA

Re: Gardening forum - 12/13/11 12:03 PM

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to keep a potted mum alive inside throughout the winter months???
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 12/13/11 03:30 PM

I keep my plants alive during the winter months by hanging fluorescent lights in the basement on chains over tables. The chains make the height of the lights from the tables adjustable. The lights are fairly cheap too. Just make sure you get plant bulbs, not Soft White, for the wider spectrum.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 12/13/11 06:14 PM

Originally Posted By: Ayuveda
98 Days until Spring. \:\)

YAY!
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 12/13/11 08:38 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
I keep my plants alive during the winter months by hanging fluorescent lights in the basement on chains over tables. The chains make the height of the lights from the tables adjustable. The lights are fairly cheap too. Just make sure you get plant bulbs, not Soft White, for the wider spectrum.


\:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/15/11 07:06 PM

Originally Posted By: sassyone
Hope that weather person is right. But what area is he predicting this for?


this area
YNN on demand
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/02/12 10:02 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
I keep my plants alive during the winter months by hanging fluorescent lights in the basement on chains over tables.


do you leave the lights on all the time or are they on a timer?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/04/12 09:14 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
I still had a few blossoms as of 11/30.


cold out there today
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/06/12 11:51 AM

Originally Posted By: sassyone
Hope that weather person is right. But what area is he predicting this for?


the weather has been rather mild so far
seems warm today
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 01/06/12 05:23 PM

That's cuz it was warm today.
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 01/07/12 05:43 AM

I had a team member share an idea w/ me yesterday: She hosts a wine and bloom evening sometime in the spring. She invites fellow gardeners to bring wine and enough cuttings from their gardens to share with the fellow guests...much like a cookie exchange.....an excellent idea which I believe I will have to follow!
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 01/07/12 06:11 AM

YAY!! Sounds fun!!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/07/12 10:46 AM

Originally Posted By: Della
That's cuz it was warm today.


50 degrees for january
have to enjoy it
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 01/07/12 10:46 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
do you leave the lights on all the time or are they on a timer?


I keep them on a timer. Never more than 12 hours of light but at least 8 hours should do the plants well.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/08/12 09:04 AM

thanks
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 01/09/12 02:55 PM

You have to figure, the longest day of the year is 12 hours of daylight. Anything between 8 and 12 hours of light is good, but that depends on the plant because some require more/less light than others.

If you use lights, try to keep them within a few inches of the top of the plants. The farther away, the weaker the rays. Fluorescent lights dissipate quickly. If using High-Pressure Sodium or Metal Halide lights they should be pretty powerful enough the hang from the ceiling, but they also consume much more wattage and give off a lot of heat.

I arrange my plants by height, with the tallest at one end and the shortest at the other end. The advantage of hanging the ballasts with chains is that I can easily adjust the height of the lights to fit perfectly above my plants.

Try not to over-crowd the plants. This is more difficult with plants that spread wide, but you want to make sure all the parts of the plants have sufficient lighting. In the past i have hung ballasts on the sides, not just above, so the light can better reach all sides of the plants.

For each table (4-foot X 6 foot) that I have plants set up on I use 2 ballasts above. Each ballast holds 4 40-watt bulbs. If I need ballasts on the sides I hang only one in front and one in back. I have to drill holes in the ballasts to insert a hook so I can hang them sideways like that.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/20/12 03:51 PM

thanks
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/20/12 03:54 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
I keep my plants alive during the winter months by hanging fluorescent lights in the basement on chains over tables.


what plants do you normally grow?
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 01/21/12 03:53 PM

I grow vegetables and get them started indoors in the beginning of Spring.
During the Winter months I'm keeping the plants we hang on the front porch down in the basement. The porch is enclosed but not heated.

Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 01/22/12 05:56 AM

Was at Lowes yesterday, the gardening department is starting to gear up. I like to look at the seed packets etc. Also my seed catalogs are starting to come in the mail...I always enjoy those!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/22/12 08:13 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
I grow vegetables and get them started indoors in the beginning of Spring.


are there any vegetables that do not sprout with this method?
what date do you normally plant the seeds?
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/12 09:42 AM

I think any vegetable or plant will sprout with this method. I usually get a tray of peat moss pods to germinate the seeds in. After they sprout I put them into small pots with soil until they go outside.

Last year I had problems because I started them in March and by the end of May they were overdue for transplanting outside, but my yard was still too wet to use the roto-tiller. It was my first year gardening on this property (new owner). I didn't realize the yard would drain so slowly. This year I won't start the seeds until April, at least.

The reason I start them indoors is only to give them a head start. We have a short growing season in New York and I'm just trying to get the most yield I can out of everything.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/12 12:28 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
I think any vegetable or plant will sprout with this method.


I was thinking the same but just wanted to check
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/12 12:29 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
We have a short growing season in New York and I'm just trying to get the most yield I can out of everything.


I agree
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/12 12:30 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
I didn't realize the yard would drain so slowly.


is it the soil composition or just a low flat area?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/12 12:36 PM

Farmers' Almanac's long range weather for the Northeast

January 2012
20th-23rd. A chance of rain or snow.
24th-27th. Storminess from the Southwest brings a dose of snow.
28th-31st. Showery, especially for Mid-Atlantic.

February 2012
1st-3rd. Rain, then fair, cold conditions.
4th-7th. Increasing clouds, cold.
8th-11th. Wet snow mixed with rain Mid-Atlantic north through New England; slushy accumulations of 4+" possible.
12th-15th. Light snow, then fair skies.
16th-19th. Unsettled.
20th-23rd. Heavy wet snow sweeps up through Mid-Atlantic across the rest of Northeast, 12+" possible; then fair, cold.
24th-29th. Spotty light snow/flurries; could turn steadier, heavier over eastern New England.

March 2012
1st-3rd. Light snow/flurries. Steadier, heavier snows along New England coast.
4th-7th. Stormy, with significant snow accumulations possible Mid-Atlantic region, then clearing.
8th-11th. Fair.
12th-15th. Light rain, especially Pennsylvania, New York, then fair.
16th-19th. Showers, heavy thunderstorms

Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 01/23/12 02:13 PM

It's a combination of low, flat area and clay. I've been doing a compost pile to till in, in hopes of eventually having better soil, but the drainage may always be a problem because of all the clay underneath. I've also tried adding gypsum to help keep the clay broken up, but I'll need far more than what I've added. It seems a little too expensive to be a viable solution at this point.

I will need to do something about the drainage, for sure. It was my first season trying to grow a garden since we'd gotten this property a couple years ago. Combine that with the fact that I'm a city boy trying to turn country and you can expect some learning curve along the way.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/12 08:21 AM

about how large is the garden?
10 x 10
10 x 20
20 x 20
or other
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/24/12 08:23 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
Last year I had problems because I started them in March and by the end of May they were overdue for transplanting outside


about how many weeks before you are able to see a sprout from the seed?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/25/12 11:38 AM

ever try chicken 'manure' tilled in?
remember someone saying they use it
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/12 09:06 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
about how large is the garden?
10 x 10
10 x 20
20 x 20
or other


if it was small enough you could try a raised bed
new soil and the water would not be as big of a problem
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/12 09:59 AM

With 3 acres I'm hoping to eventually have a large garden, much too large to bother with raised beds. I placed it along the side of the property and it was about 10 feet wide and about 50 feet long. The 50 foot length will probably remain the same but each year I hope to make it wider, as I add more crops to what I'm growing.

As for how long it takes for seeds to sprout, that varies. My tomatoes sprouted within a week or so. My peppers took up to 3 weeks.

There is a farmer up the road that once offered me some cow manure. I'm not the type to ask for anything or accept things for free, so I never contacted him about it. I was thinking of at least giving him some money to bring over a tractor bucket full. Otherwise, I'm just building compost piles as large as I can get them and plan to till that into the soil.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/12 12:05 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
much too large to bother with raised beds.


correct
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/12 12:08 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong

There is a farmer up the road that once offered me some cow manure. I'm not the type to ask for anything or accept things for free, so I never contacted him about it. I was thinking of at least giving him some money to bring over a tractor bucket full. Otherwise, I'm just building compost piles as large as I can get them and plan to till that into the soil.


would it make sense to pay him to deliver and till in the manure?
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 01/27/12 04:08 PM

My daffodils and crocuses are coming up!!!!!

\:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/28/12 09:01 AM

flowers will be confused with the mild weather

will the groundhog see its shadow?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/07/12 12:34 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
There is a farmer up the road that once offered me some cow manure.


ask local restaurants for food scraps for the compost
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 02/07/12 04:00 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
There is a farmer up the road that once offered me some cow manure.


ask local restaurants for food scraps for the compost



Good idea. Just avoid using any meat or bones in the compost. They can unbalance the nutrients and attract scavengers.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/09/12 08:27 AM

would have to state what is acceptable in the material
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 02/09/12 09:12 AM

Yep, the restaurants responsibility to do that.

A great idea. These place are making it happen.

http://www.nola.com/news/index.ssf/2011/10/scraps_from_local_eateries_fue.html
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/09/12 01:11 PM

many large restaurants may be willing to seperate it as they will save on disposal fees
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 02/09/12 01:15 PM

I think you're right.

Collection and location for distribution would need to be addressed.
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 02/09/12 03:50 PM

I had a friend in Florida a few years back that I met online through gaming, and he would collect free oil from the fryers at a few diners. He had a kit at home that he used to turn the oil into diesel fuel. It sounded like a pretty good gig because he paid a lot less per gallon than at the pump. He said the biggest downside is that anybody that drove behind him would smell like french fries. \:D
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/10/12 09:38 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
He had a kit at home that he used to turn the oil into diesel fuel. It sounded like a pretty good gig because he paid a lot less per gallon than at the pump.


only needs to pay to 'refine' it
$1 a gallon or less
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/13/12 12:17 PM

Originally Posted By: Ayuveda
I think you're right.



you give me far too much credit
;\)
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 02/13/12 12:24 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Ayuveda
I think you're right.



you give me far too much credit
;\)



Just credit where credit's do. ;\)

Pass it on.



Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/14/12 01:14 PM

the snow is slowly melting
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/18/12 09:22 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
You have to figure, the longest day of the year is 12 hours of daylight. Anything between 8 and 12 hours of light is good, but that depends on the plant because some require more/less light than others.

If you use lights, try to keep them within a few inches of the top of the plants. The farther away, the weaker the rays. Fluorescent lights dissipate quickly. If using High-Pressure Sodium or Metal Halide lights they should be pretty powerful enough the hang from the ceiling, but they also consume much more wattage and give off a lot of heat.


would heating pads/electric blanket be cheaper to run?

Quote:
Using lights or heating pads for seed germination?
I am starting some tomato seeds and the seed catalogs say to keep them at approx. 75 degrees to keep them warm enough to germinate. I have them under flourescent lights, but it wasn't keeping them warm enough so I put a heating pad under the seed tray as well. Is it okay to use both? Also, do I keep the lights on until the seeds germinate and then just 12-14 hours a day? I appreciate the help!

Quote:

I'm not entirely sure on the subject but I work at a greenhouse and we have a small germinator which is heated with no extra lighting & using steam to keep the trays of plants moist.. I believe in the way we do it that the heat would be the more important part of the two. But I can't see using both light and heat hurting them.
Quote:

After our tomato plants "pop" we pull them out and they begin to grow with a normal days light cycle. So I would say do the 12-14hrs after you see them pop.
Quote:

Tomato seeds don't need a lot of light to germinate, so don't worry about a lot of light until the true leaves appear. They can use plenty of light after that. A specific number of hours isn't really important. I just turn the light on when I get up in the morning and off at bedtime. Keep the light close enough so the plants don't get "leggy" from reaching toward it. If you are using a regular heating pad to speed germination, be careful that they aren't getting too hot.


Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 02/19/12 03:15 AM

Can't wait! My wife's Hyacinth should be sprouting soon! Just like llilac's...it's an outright shame they don't last longer \:\(
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/20/12 10:22 AM

near 50 degrees tuesday
;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/29/12 06:22 PM

Quote:
one weatherperson is prediction a milder winter this year


nice call
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/02/12 08:31 AM

60 degrees next week....
windy tonight and tomorrow
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/02/12 11:19 AM

Bed linens washed and outdoors on the clothesline in the sun and fresh air. God is his heaven, all is right in my world today.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/02/12 12:40 PM

just be aware there is a high wind watch for tonight and tomorrow
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/02/12 01:53 PM

Not too worry they will off the line and back on the bed shortly. ;\) I love fresh line dried sheets.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 04:14 AM

WOW the wind is whipping!!! If Silver Fox forgot to take them of the line....something tells me her linens and *unmentionables* are gonna end up here in Onondaga County!
Posted by: oneonone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 07:12 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
WOW the wind is whipping!!! If Silver Fox forgot to take them of the line....something tells me her linens and *unmentionables* are gonna end up here in Onondaga County!
You are toooo funny! ;\) Once again you brought a smile to my face this morning! Thank You! \:\)
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 07:30 AM

My pleasure.... and I was REALLY hoping the *unmentionables* would make it to me! If you haven't heard it from Ovidian, Festus, or Fud P... I have a *thing* for women's undergarments ;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 08:40 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
;\) I love fresh line dried sheets.


I agree
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 10:41 AM

Do you hang your sheets outside to dry?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 10:51 AM

lol
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/12 11:20 AM

The wind blew all the wrinkles out of the sheets. They were as smooth as silk. Almost like they had been ironed. The smell was pure fresh, clean not all perfumed from fabric softener. I have a clothes dryer that I haven't used in years.

As for the *unmentionables* they are on line today flapping in the breeze. LOL
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/12 08:59 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I have a clothes dryer that I haven't used in years.


what do you use in the winter?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/12 04:51 PM

A very large set of clothes bars that I bought at Sauders.If I want the clothes to dry faster I open the heat register, turn on the ceiling fan and close the bedroom door. Still cheaper than running a gas dryer.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/04/12 04:51 PM

A very large set of clothes bars that I bought at Sauders.If I want the clothes to dry faster I open the heat register, turn on the ceiling fan and close the bedroom door. Still cheaper than running a gas dryer.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/12 09:48 AM

plus it adds 'moisture' into the dry air
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/12 10:58 AM

Just using what is already here and not running a clothes dryer that makes static in clothes and uses both natural gas and electricity to run.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/12 11:03 AM

I agree
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/12 04:55 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Just using what is already here and not running a clothes dryer that makes static in clothes and uses both natural gas and electricity to run.


I prefer to keep the National Grid executives happy with their annual bonuses ;\)

Wednesday may be close to 65.... I may have to take a drive to Seneca County in hopes of seeing Silver Fox's *unmentionables* on the line drying ;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/12 09:09 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Wednesday may be close to 65...


that will perk up the flowers to emerge
Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/12 09:32 AM

My tulips are sprouting \:\)
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/12 10:22 AM

Originally Posted By: Della
My tulips are sprouting \:\)



LIKE!!!!!
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/12 12:45 PM

Sorry, Scottie, laundry is all done for this week. Besides, my "unmentionables" are boring. No thongs or Bikinis on or off the clothes lines.
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/12 06:11 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
plus it adds 'moisture' into the dry air

Do you like moisture?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 08:08 AM

helps in the winter
inside dry air
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 08:18 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Originally Posted By: Della
My tulips are sprouting \:\)



LOVE!!!!!


60+ degrees today
;\)
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 09:36 AM

Will you be outside enjoying it?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 03:21 PM

Originally Posted By: Della
My tulips are sprouting \:\)


Our daffodils have been blooming for a few days.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 04:26 PM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Originally Posted By: Della
My tulips are sprouting \:\)


Our daffodils have been blooming for a few days.


Blooming? Lucky you. My purple and yellow crocuses are in full bloom, but my daffodils have a few weeks to go till they bloom. I don't even see any buds yet. Soon.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 04:58 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Sorry, Scottie, laundry is all done for this week. Besides, my "unmentionables" are boring. No thongs or Bikinis on or off the clothes lines.


DRATS!!! I can NEVER win! \:\( If it weren't for bad luck....I'd have NO luck at all! \:\(
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/07/12 07:31 PM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Originally Posted By: Della
My tulips are sprouting \:\)


Our daffodils have been blooming for a few days.


likely in full sun
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/08/12 09:19 AM

cooler tomorrow
50's next week
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/08/12 10:45 AM

Yeah...2 ft from the south side of the house.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/09/12 01:51 AM

Thoroughly enjoyed Wednesday and Yesterday only to wake to a dusting of snow this morning \:\( ONLY in NY \:\/
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/09/12 02:50 PM

Blizzardy today---flip-flops next week. Hello March! In like a lion out like a lamb...
Posted by: Ayuveda

Re: Gardening forum - 03/09/12 07:36 PM

Spring garden. Down on all fours.

Heaven.
Posted by: Doesn't Matter

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/12 02:13 PM

Originally Posted By: Ayuveda
Spring garden. Down on all fours.

Heaven.



Out looking at the lawn tractor , getting it ready to put the rototiller on. Am I putting the cart before the horse.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/12 02:16 PM

No. Sugar snap peas can be planted next week.
Mine will be. \:\)
Posted by: Doesn't Matter

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/12 02:24 PM

I'm thinking about trying to put in a couple of early cabbages along with the peas.
Posted by: 123

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/12 08:27 PM

I think I`ll plant my grass seeds this week.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/12 01:42 AM

I just checked yesterday and my wife's Hyacinth isn't coming up \:\( It has returned the past 2 years but not this year?? \:\( Guess i will have to buy her more this easter and plant the bulbs when they are finished.

This week I will be pruning my Lilac bush....I have some more dead spots... however the dead spots I pruned last year now have buds.... so if I get the rest this year next year should be a full bush!
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/12 01:56 PM

My clematis is starting to show new green shoots on the old vines and my hydranges are showing signs of life too. Next thing you know the lawn will need mowing.
Posted by: Roadtrip2nowhere

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/12 02:41 PM

I think I may bring in some branches and put them in water to force bloom. I don't have pussy willows, but I do have trumpet vine....hummmmm...
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/12 04:48 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I just checked yesterday and my wife's Hyacinth isn't coming up \:\( It has returned the past 2 years but not this year?? \:\( Guess i will have to buy her more this easter and plant the bulbs when they are finished.

This week I will be pruning my Lilac bush....I have some more dead spots... however the dead spots I pruned last year now have buds.... so if I get the rest this year next year should be a full bush!

That's too bad. My Hyacinths are about 5 inches high. Must be a squirrel got the bulb. Bummer.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/12 09:19 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
My clematis is starting to show new green shoots on the old vines and my hydranges are showing signs of life too. Next thing you know the lawn will need mowing.


seventy degrees next week is being predicted by the weather person
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/12 11:14 AM

Probably follow by a huge snow storm the end of March or first part of April. After all, this is NYS - Mother Nature at her most unpredictable self.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/12 02:08 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Probably follow by a huge snow storm the end of March or first part of April.


it has happened before

a few inches of snow is managable compared to the strong storms the southern states have recently seen

Posted by: LOTE

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 07:04 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I just checked yesterday and my wife's Hyacinth isn't coming up \:\( It has returned the past 2 years but not this year?? \:\( Guess i will have to buy her more this easter and plant the bulbs when they are finished.


My MIL bought me 1/2 dozen hyacinths (one of my fave flowers)the year before she passed away and I only see one coming up this year \:\(

Lilacs are fully budded & my two new (blue) President Abe Lincoln lilacs that I just planted last year also have buds on them. Good to know they survived the windy winter we've had.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 09:09 AM

wonder if the lilac festival in rochester will have to be moved forward?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 10:13 AM

Originally Posted By: twocats
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Originally Posted By: Della
My tulips are sprouting \:\)


Our daffodils have been blooming for a few days.


Blooming? Lucky you. My purple and yellow crocuses are in full bloom, but my daffodils have a few weeks to go till they bloom. I don't even see any buds yet. Soon.


I was wrong. We didn't plant the bulbs, and, since they were yellow and hadn't opened, I thought they were daffodils.

Since they have now fully opened, I see that they are yellow, as well as variegated violet+white petalled, gold centered, croci, which I've never planted, except for crocus autumnal, which are pale violet, with taller foliage, and bloom in Sept. Those are beautiful, too, and I'm going to dig some up before I move to here at the end of March.

We live at 67 E. Main, and there are even more of the same 2 varieties (colors) of croci at 35 E. Main, right by the sidewalk.

LOL, I can imagine someome strolling through life, or strolling home one night from the Dryden Hotel, and taking the time to stop and steal the flowers.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 04:07 PM

So, is this your kind way of telling me it's croci, not crocuses?
\:\)
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 05:25 PM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith

I was wrong. We didn't plant the bulbs, and, since they were yellow and hadn't opened, I thought they were daffodils.

Since they have now fully opened, I see that they are yellow, as well as variegated violet+white petalled, gold centered, croci, which I've never planted, except for crocus autumnal, which are pale violet, with taller foliage, and bloom in Sept. Those are beautiful, too, and I'm going to dig some up before I move to here at the end of March.

We live at 67 E. Main, and there are even more of the same 2 varieties (colors) of croci at 35 E. Main, right by the sidewalk.

LOL, I can imagine someome strolling through life, or strolling home one night from the Dryden Hotel, and taking the time to stop and steal the flowers.


All it would take is one hungry squirrel storing up a few treats for the winter.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 08:47 PM

Quote:
mower...


before starting a mower (push or riding) it is best to check the oil and smell it for gas odor or if it is diluted

if you smell gas in the oil then change the oil before starting the engine

gas in the oil can severely damage the engine
Posted by: MeRightYouWrong

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 10:13 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
before starting a mower (push or riding) it is best to check the oil and smell it for gas odor or if it is diluted

if you smell gas in the oil then change the oil before starting the engine

gas in the oil can severely damage the engine



You're a smart feller.
Posted by: 123

Re: Gardening forum - 03/14/12 10:22 PM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
Originally Posted By: bluezone
before starting a mower (push or riding) it is best to check the oil and smell it for gas odor or if it is diluted

if you smell gas in the oil then change the oil before starting the engine

gas in the oil can severely damage the engine



Mine fired right up with just 1 pole and I mowed the front lawn today. Then went and got the old tiller out and did the garden

You're a smart feller.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/12 10:28 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong

You're a smart feller.


some may not be aware of this
better to change the oil on a riding mower than to have to spend a large amount for a new one
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/15/12 11:19 AM

Originally Posted By: MeRightYouWrong
Mine fired right up with just 1 pole and I mowed the front lawn today.


your grass grews mighty fast
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/16/12 10:18 AM

a little rain and plenty of sun for them plants to shoot up
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/16/12 09:48 PM

Originally Posted By: twocats
So, is this your kind way of telling me it's croci, not crocuses?
\:\)


LOL. It's either, to non-ancient Romans. And after all, how often do we talk of the stadia of the NFL, FI? "Croci" does save 4 strokes, though.

The thing I like best about Latin, though, is that nobody complains about your accent, because the accent is even deader than the language..
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/22/12 04:14 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I just checked yesterday and my wife's Hyacinth isn't coming up \:\( It has returned the past 2 years but not this year?? \:\( Guess i will have to buy her more this easter and plant the bulbs when they are finished.

This week I will be pruning my Lilac bush....I have some more dead spots... however the dead spots I pruned last year now have buds.... so if I get the rest this year next year should be a full bush!



I LIED!!!!! It came back!!! There was absolutely NO sign of it ....then POOF it's there!!

Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/22/12 08:36 PM

Happy you found it. Do they multiply in their own? I swear I have more this year than ever before.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 03/23/12 02:59 AM

Mine hasn't multiplied.... same ole lonely one. I am just happy it's back!!!! \:\) Price Chopper has racks upon racks of them for sale.... I'll just wait till they are about dead and get them for 75% off and plant the bulbs.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/01/12 02:06 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I LIED!!!!! It came back!!! There was absolutely NO sign of it ....then POOF it's there!!



has it been covered by snow yet?

looks like our few days of 'summer' are over
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 04/03/12 06:13 AM

Not covered in snow.... but a little droopy right now.... currently 27 degrees. I hope these cold nights ruin my lilac bush the leaves have already sprouted

As far as the Lilac Fest being moved up....regardless if they move it or not it will rain almost the entire 10 days like it does ever year \:\/ That is why when we had our Kettle Korn business we never worked it....too much of a risk considering it was $5,000 plus a percentage of profits for a spot. Not to mention I would of had to use most of my vacation time just to work 12hour days 10 days straight to work the festival.

P.S.
They say 60 on Saturday and 69 Easter Sunday \:\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/03/12 12:34 PM

The new hydrangea plants I put in last summer had just started to come to life and the weather changed. I covered them with large plastic flower pots until Mother Nature gets over her temper tantrum. Really think she needs some anger management or a an attitude adjustment. Pretty rotten to let all the plants and fruit trees start up and them turn cold on them. There is an ornamental tree down the road from me that was in full bloom and now all the blooms are brown on it. Hope the tree doesn't die from the shock.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/04/12 08:21 AM

the weather person is saying that it may get cooler again next week

hope it stays warm for the plants to survive
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 04/05/12 05:52 AM

I do too.... Beak and Skiff apple farm lost 40% of their buds with the freeze a week or so ago....no word on the loss with the latest freeze

Same here Silver Fox. There are a lot of flowering trees in my neighborhood that I enjoy every spring but now all of them are just brown \:\(

At last check lest night my Lilac Tree is unharmed, still has leaves and the buds are even starting to open \:\) The Hyacinth has survived too! \:\) I am so attached to my Lilac tree because it is right outside our dining room windows, and there is nothing I enjoy more than in spring time eating with the windows open and having a lilac scented room \:\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/05/12 01:35 PM

Love the lilacs. I have about a 30-40 foot stretch of old liliac trees along the border of my back yard. When they bloom they can be smelled all over my back yard and deck. Too bad they are not the new re-blooming kind that bloom all summer. The new hydrangeas are the re-blooming kind I planted last summer.Looking forward to them growing and blooming all summer.If they do well I may plant more of them like a hedge along my driveway to replace the miserable thorny hedge I had removed last year.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/19/12 04:23 PM

I have a small bouquet of lilacs from my bushes. \:\)
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/19/12 08:26 PM

Mine aren't in bloom yet.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/12 05:47 AM

My lilacs and all the tree leaves are like they are in *suspended animation* ever since the heat streak broke nothing has grown any further??

On a side note.... I am traveling today to the Waterloo Holiday Inn for the NYS Dart Tournament...Silver Fox, any chance you will be *line drying* your "unmentionables" today????
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/12 10:01 AM

As a matter of fact the washer just finished the first load. LOL
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/12 04:20 AM

WOO HOO!
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/12 10:35 AM

Bet you missed it. Lots of people had clothes on the line the past couple of days. By the time I took them down the wind was so strong that they were all wrinkle free.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/12 11:10 AM

Quote:
Bet you missed it.


He took photos. They'll be hanging in his wife's boss's office, if you'd like to see them.

Quote:
By the time I took them down the wind was so strong that they were all wrinkle free.


Wasn't it great? I stood outside for an hour, and now look like I'm 25.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/12 02:24 PM

Oh, if only standing outside in the wind worked that way for me. LOL Better yet if it was strong enough to blow a few pounds off.

Bet he didn't get the really good stuff. They are all hung in the center behind the sheets, towels, and long clothing. So they are not visible. LOL The sheets smelled and felt fantastic.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 04/22/12 03:43 AM

Quote:
He took photos. They'll be hanging in his wife's boss's office, if you'd like to see them.


LOL! Yes I did take photos.... but they are in my nightstand drawer next to the lotion and kleenex
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/22/12 11:28 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith

Wasn't it great? I stood outside for an hour, and now look like I'm 25.

HA! \:D
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/22/12 11:41 AM

Okay...250, then.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/23/12 01:39 PM

snow in april
the plants are not sure if they should bloom or go dormant

darn ground hog made an error
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/07/12 08:12 AM

only about half of our lilacs bloomed
the cold weather did some damage
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/07/12 07:13 PM

I didn't get as many lilacs as usual either. Usually the trees are full of blooms and the scent is all over the back yard and deck. This year not many blooms and hardly any of the usual heavy fragrance.
Posted by: Frisco kid

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 12:03 AM

Lilac festival starts Friday come get your fill of fragrance.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 10:27 AM

Are the lilacs that grow there subject to substantially different yearly weather variance influences than SF's are? Will they not be affected similarly to hers?
Posted by: Frisco kid

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 12:53 PM

LOL, no they are subject to the same weather. And they are a bit past peak now because of the crazy rollercoaster spring weather we had this year. But it is also a numbers game. There are just so many of them as opposed to say a handfull of bushes in ones yard that many are pretty much in prime condition from being protected by other bushes. And the weather is supposed to be sunny and beautiful Friday, Saturday and Sunday. (For a change)Come enjoy the sights AND smells. \:\)
http://www.lilacfestival.com/scheduleofevents.html
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 12:58 PM

WOW what happened to their music line-up???? Back in the day they used to get top-notch National Acts \:\(
Posted by: Frisco kid

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 01:02 PM

Probably money like everything else. Johnny Winter opening night has potential to be good. And Rochester's own Lou Gramm Thursday the 17th will draw a huge crowd.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 02:11 PM

I've got to see it some year.

http://www.google.com/search?q=rochester...iw=1280&bih=810
Posted by: Frisco kid

Re: Gardening forum - 05/08/12 05:12 PM

Yes but this sure isn't the year. I feel bad for the vendors, again. Usually it rains almost everyday for this.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/11/12 09:24 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I didn't get as many lilacs as usual either. Usually the trees are full of blooms and the scent is all over the back yard and deck. This year not many blooms and hardly any of the usual heavy fragrance.



most of the flowers are limited this year
seems it will be sunny today
needs to warm up a bit
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/21/12 10:57 AM

Originally Posted By: Frisco kid
Lilac festival starts Friday come get your fill of fragrance.


with the sunny weather the attendance at the lilac festival should have broken some records
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/30/12 10:01 PM

roses a starting to bloom
temperatures getting back to normal
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 05/31/12 11:26 AM

Wondering how many gardens got damaged in Seneca Falls by the storm Tuesday?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/02/12 09:39 AM

a large number of trees where down
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/06/12 08:06 AM

the weather person is saying sunnier weather and temps going to the 90's

considerable amount of fluctuations recently
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 06/07/12 10:42 AM

Anyone still needing bedding plants, Lowes in Waterloo has some good mark downs on 6 pack plants. Just wander around there are many carts of mark downs in various locations. The plants are in pretty good shape. Over heard a comment that a shipment that was supposed to be delivered for Memorial Day arrived very late. Happy hunting. LOL I made out like a bandit with some as low as $.25. I was late getting plants this year because of stainning the deck and furniture. Now to get all those plants in pots and planters for the deck.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/11/12 04:43 PM

the strange weather may have delayed the shipments
$.25 for plants is a bargain
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 06/11/12 10:38 PM

The plants were all in good shape too. Not like other places that wait until the plants are wilted and half dead before they reduce the prices. The ones I got looked just a healthy as the full priced ones.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/12/12 09:18 AM

how do you like the new riding mower?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/18/12 07:40 PM

90 degrees and humid the next few days per the weather person
will need to water the plants
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 06/19/12 03:30 AM

Went to the regional market Saturday and got my herbs for my window boxes I put on my deck railing. Thyme, Rosemary, Dill, Chives, and Italian Parsley. Sad I do not have my mini garden this year, but with my back issues it was impossible for me to till, weed, and bend to plant \:\( Oh well, there is always next year and I can plan in advance and start everything from seed indoors instead of purchasing.

On the bright side I was able to save from my wife's BLACK THUMB the gerber daisies, stuck plant, and Martha Washingtons that my wife received for office staff appreciation day. They are now replanted and flourishing nicely \:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/19/12 08:48 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Went to the regional market Saturday and got my herbs for my window boxes I put on my deck railing. Sad I do not have my mini garden this year, but with my back issues it was impossible for me to till, weed, and bend to plant


you may have been able to plant some of the garden items in the window boxes so that you would not have to weed and bend
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 06/19/12 10:56 AM

I have had a Martha Washington for 3 or 4 years. Bring it in and put it by a sunny window in the winter and put it back out for the summer. It gets a little stringy in the winter. So I cut it back in the spring and let it go again.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 06/20/12 03:17 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Went to the regional market Saturday and got my herbs for my window boxes I put on my deck railing. Sad I do not have my mini garden this year, but with my back issues it was impossible for me to till, weed, and bend to plant


you may have been able to plant some of the garden items in the window boxes so that you would not have to weed and bend


I doubt corn or cherry tomatoes would grow very well in my window boxes I am however going to get a *patio* tomato plant. This will just give me a reason to go to the regional market and get fresh produce \:\) I found a vendor selling homegrown strawberries for $3/qt....others were selling them for $4-$5/qt

I walk the whole market first and then go back through and buy from the ones that were the best and cheapest. The vendors in the first building closest to the parking lot bank on *impulse buys* and are usually the most expensive. That was the building that had $5/qt strawberries \:\/
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 06/20/12 03:21 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I have had a Martha Washington for 3 or 4 years. Bring it in and put it by a sunny window in the winter and put it back out for the summer. It gets a little stringy in the winter. So I cut it back in the spring and let it go again.


Thanks for the tip!!! I will try my best to keep it going!

3 years ago I had snapdragons for the first time. I LOVED them! They were beautiful, hearty, and bloomed multiple times till late October. I also was pleasantly surprised to see a couple come back the next year! \:\)
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 06/20/12 06:25 AM

I love snapdragons! A few of mine came back the next year too.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/24/12 04:36 PM

back to the 'cooler' temps
the plants need a little rain
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 06/25/12 06:14 AM

My plants are LOVING this cooler weather! Within a week my Martha Washington is going to explode with flowers! \:\) My gerber daisy's have 7 flowers with 2 more coming up! \:\)

Even though it might rain today I gave my plants and herbs a light watering with miracle grow this morning because the soil was getting dry...they have predicted possible showers for DAYS now and it has yet to come \:\/
Posted by: Red22

Re: Gardening forum - 06/29/12 08:55 AM

I have a bit of a problem in one of my flower gardens, maybe some of you would have some advice. Nothing I plant flourishes in it because it's right next to two big sugar maple trees. They either suck up all the water, or their roots don't let anything grow. I think I'm going to have to put down a ton of topsoil and "raise" it.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 06/29/12 03:43 PM

I have these blue phlox under my sugar maple. They bloom beautifully in the Spring, and I never need to water them.

I also have orange day lilies that need no watering.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/30/12 09:16 AM

Originally Posted By: Red22
I think I'm going to have to put down a ton of topsoil and "raise" it.


have you tested the PH of the soil?
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/03/12 02:26 AM

WOO HOOO! I acquired a Patio Tomato plant and brought it back from the brink of death(watered, miracle grow, plucked the "suckers" and trimmed the dead leaves and stems) and already there are 2 of the tomatoes starting to turn red! MMMMMMmmmmm Roma tomatoes to boot MMMMMmmmm

For those who don't know "suckers" are the tiny stems that grow at the *V* of the stem and rob all the nutrients from that stem

Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/03/12 11:00 AM

Thanks for the lesson. I never knew about "suckers". Guess I better go check my tomato plants that are growing like crazy. I used a product called "Root Blast" on them this year. I used it on all the annuals that I potted and put on my deck too. Everything it growing healthy and blooming. My deck is in direct sun until late afternoon. I have always had a problem keeping the plants alive. This year everything is doing great. Maybe the Root Blast is growing healthier roots for better water retention.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/04/12 03:28 AM

Yes the *suckers* can limit the amount of tomatoes you get or worse case scenario stunt or kill the plant.

Easy trick for peppers (jalepeno, cherry pepper, banana pepper,bell pepper, etc.) they thrive on phosphorus. A little wet ground up newspaper mixed in with the soil gives them just the amount they like! ;\)

2 years ago in my mini garden on the side of my deck I grew 4 beefsteak tomato plants, 4 cherry tomato, 3 jalepeno, 3 cherry pepper and 3 banana pepper and they grew great together...word of caution though if you want to grow something other than peppers in that spot give the spot a year of nothing for the soil to recoup.

With that being said...that was my first and last year growing beefsteak....yes they provide LARGE tomatoes, but it takes ALL summer for them to grow and ripen and I get too impatient
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/04/12 10:36 AM

I have good luck with "Early Girl" tomatoes. The tomatoes are smaller - about the size of a baseball. Personally, I like the smaller size because I can use it up in one sandwich. To me, the large tomatoes don't keep as well because one slice fills the whole sandwich. Then you have a cut tomato that starts to get mushy.

I have 6 Early Girls in the ground that are growing like crazy. They already have small green tomatoes on them. They have tripled in size since I planted them Memorial Day. (Got a late start because I was busy stainning my 12 x 22 foot deck.)

Last year, I had 3 Early Girl and 3 Jet Star. The Early Girl did much better. I had all the tomatoes I could eat and still stocked the freezer with tomatoes for soup and sauce all winter.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/17/12 06:49 PM

with all the heat them plants sure need to be watered to surivive

there is no rain in the forecast
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/17/12 08:38 PM

They get a good watering every other day and they are doing great.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/12 05:14 AM

I water my plants early morning and late night when the humidity and temps are the lowest.

I am so glad to be home Black Thumb Holly and Lindsay nearly killed all my plants and flowers while I was in the hospital!!! I spent yesterday morning taking care of them. It appears they are all gonna survive.

Tomato plant and flowers



Spices.... from left to right... Chives, Lavender, Sweet Basil, Italian Parsley, Rosemary, Winter Thyme, Dill

Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 07/18/12 11:40 AM

Scottie this is the instructions that came with my new Martha Washington:

Quote:
A delightful flowering plant for house or patio with long lasting flowers. Display in a bright area of the home. May be planted outdoors in flower beds, patio pots. Protect from strong afternoon sun. Flowering performance is best under cool night conditions. Care: Indoors display in a bright sunny location. Outdoors plant in a well drained soil. Water thoughly and allow soil to dry between waterings. Apply a balanced water soluble fertilizer every two weeks.


I keep mine on the deck in the summer and bring it in the house in the fall before the heat is turned on. It needs a lot of light indoors. It gets a little "stringy" in the house. So in the spring I trim it back a little before I send it out to the deck for the summer.

Also, I never realized that the Martha, unlike a regular geranium, does not tolerate full sun. Now that I have moved it to an area that only gets early morning sun it is doing better.

I soak my plants every other evening so that they have the cool night to absorb the water. Most of my deck is in full sun and the plants dry out without a container to hold water between waterings.

Noticing your tomato plant reminds me of planting tomatoes in containers and the tomatoes would disappear as they got ripe before I could pick them. I would go to pick the ones I had seen and they would be gone. Turns out my Keeshond liked tomatoes (and the strawberries)and I had to move the pots and put up a fence to keep her out of them.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/19/12 03:03 AM

Thank you for the instructions....I am going to try and keep it alive and going for next year


Little Ms. Meadow LOVES cherry tomatoes LOL .... 2 years ago when I had my cherry tomato plants on the side of the deck she would ever so carefully pluck and eat the ripe ones(she didn't like the ones that had fallen to the ground) LOL My 4 cherry tomato plants were HUGE (over 6 foot tall) and I was over run with cherry tomatoes, so I didn't mind sharing
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 07/19/12 12:02 PM

I read somewhere that it's best to water plants early in the morning. Watering at night (especially hot humid nights) can lead to mildew.
\:\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/10/12 10:11 AM

has anyones lawn turned back to green instead of brown?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 08/10/12 11:06 AM

Patches here and there are green but still a lot of brown.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/11/12 04:33 AM

My front yard is all green and has been all summer.... back lawn is mostly green with some brown patches. I mowed the lawn Wednesday and with all the rain we have been getting... it is almost time to mow again

With the rain and milder temps I haven't had to water my plants twice a day anymore. Also I transplanted the winter thyme and basil from the window boxes to their own pots because they growing like crazy and stealing the water and nutrients from the other plants.

My Patio tomato plant I rescued is getting HUGE! When I got it it was near death and only got 8 tomatoes after nursing it back to health.... since then it started flowering again and now I have 16 new tomatoes starting!!

Has anyone else ever gotten 2 yields off of one tomato plant?? This is a first for me
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/15/12 03:13 PM

Quote:
My front yard is all green and has been all summer....


Mine, too. I cut at 2 1/2"; that may have something to do with it. I also top dressed it with a cow manure/sawdust mixture. And most of the mowing has been done with the reel mower, the shearing action of which leaves a more sealed blade top, with less water loss and tip browning.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/19/12 11:56 AM

I have a *mulching blade* on the mower and never rake the clippings. Also last mow of the year I mow up all the leaves and leave them there for the winter
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/22/12 09:16 PM

About 2 weeks ago I planted 2 kinds of lettuce, carrots, radishes, cilantro, and onions, which are all up and doing well, and 2 days ago, some beets, as an afterthought. They might be the size of radishes, but darn it, we're going to have beets, where the spring red lettuce was, and $.71 for the seeds isn't much compared to the pleasure of watching them grow. Watered today.
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/23/12 06:28 AM

My garden is doing great. The weeds have been a problem we have some almost 6' high. Same soil as always must of been a great seed pool that they came from?
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/12 04:19 AM

MMMmmmmm Beets!!! Hopefully my back cooperates next year and I will be able to plant a garden instead of having a patio tomato plant and my herbs in window boxes \:\(
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/12 08:17 PM

Originally Posted By: I did it!
My garden is doing great. The weeds have been a problem we have some almost 6' high. Same soil as always must of been a great seed pool that they came from?


Six feet? Yes, you have a problem. Want me to come over and take them out?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/12 08:29 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
MMMmmmmm Beets!!! Hopefully my back cooperates next year and I will be able to plant a garden instead of having a patio tomato plant and my herbs in window boxes \:\(


I've never liked beets much, but that probably has something to do with me refusing to ever try them.

Anyway...I've changed...all grown up now (well, sort of...I wouldn't want to overdo it), and I've heard that anarchists thrive on beets.

I have a friend who is a neocon...they like beets, too. Trouble is, they can't just dig and rinse them. Oh, no...they've always got to pretend that they're waterboarding them. I wouldn't mind, but it scares the cats...

Got a tiller, Scottie?
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/24/12 10:27 PM

Mr.Smith,
Problem today caught some birds eating my seeds. That wasn`t to bad but they could not fly very high,hmmm! Must of been low quality Mexican plants. You want to help cut them down bring your chain saw. The buds are normal size,purple in color, sticky & stinky aprox 10"/14" long. What did I do wrong bro do I give up gardening all together or just grow Sun Flowers?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/25/12 01:04 AM

You're doing just fine. Okay...sit tight, don't panic, and I'll be over to take those nasty, dangerous weeds out of there! Don't worry, I will dispose of them in an appropriate and safe manner.

No problem at all...I'm rated for 12% THC; it'll be child's play.

Be warned, though; Obomber may come by, prattling about how you didn't plant that garden, or that it's some kind of village garden or something. He may even offer you a health care package. Don't fall for it; he's out of coke, and he's liable to say anything to fool you...even that he and his cronies grew that garden.
Posted by: Teonan

Re: Gardening forum - 08/25/12 01:16 AM

12%?

Jeezus VM. AK-47 in the house at over 20.


FYI. Community gardens and crop share are the future.



Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/25/12 06:50 AM

No Tiller Smitty.... Just a shovel, Garden c.l.a.w., and garden weasel, sweat, and hard work.

I might not have a problem getting the soil loosened, but my back won't allow me to bend to dig,plant, and weed. Hopefully by next growing season my back will be fixed for the 3rd time and I will be able to dig and bend without issue \:\(

To ease you way into liking beets try this recipe! I have my wife's grandmother make it for me at every Holiday gathering MMMMMmmmmmmmm. It is so sweet, tender, and yummy I could easily eat it as a dessert

Harvard Beets
3/4 cup white sugar
4 teaspoons cornstarch
1/3 cup white vinegar
1/3 cup water
2 (15 ounce) cans sliced beets, drained
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Directions:
In a saucepan, combine the sugar, cornstarch, vinegar and water. Bring to a boil, and cook for 5 minute. Add the beets to the liquid, and simmer for 30 minutes over low heat. Stir in butter, salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Serve warm or chilled.

Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/26/12 11:42 AM

[quote=Teonan]12%?

Jeezus VM. AK-47 in the house at over 20.


Hmmm! interesting comment. Is this fact or just a guess?
Posted by: Teonan

Re: Gardening forum - 08/26/12 12:43 PM

Originally Posted By: I did it!
[quote=Teonan]12%?

Jeezus VM. AK-47 in the house at over 20.


Hmmm! interesting comment. Is this fact or just a guess?






yep. over 20%. A mighty nice strain.
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/26/12 03:47 PM

Gees I thought you were trying to count my toys for a minute.
Just got back from range today 1000 rounds spent.
Practice until you bleed then practice somemore and in my standards that's not enough. 400 yrds nothing to it.
Going the Sky's and kill some more trees in a few days
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/26/12 10:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Teonan
12%?

Jeezus VM. AK-47 in the house at over 20.


FYI. Community gardens and crop share are the future.





Yeah, but the present is the sweet light green pointy pepper I picked and quickly fried up with the bacon and ham, and the fresh tomatoes and cukes straight from my backyard to the salad bowl. Dryden Community gardens are in sight of my back yard. Many thanks to Jean, who, when I strolled up there to see her garden, tipped me about the free manure/sawdust mixture available from the Dryden Cattle auction down E. Main. Just back your truck up and shovel it on. Although, I'll bet that if you tipped them a few, one of those guys would use the loader for you.

The DCG are located on a plot where the auction dumped that mixture for years. Great soil, they work it easily by hand.

But, Scottie, I worked it in with my Earthwise 8.5 amp tiller. Nice unit. Mine is a rebranded unit sold by Lawnturf. $120...I've seen it elsewhere for $170.

I take the strain off my back by tying a line to the handle bar, around my waist, and back to bar. But, once I've broken and tilled the virgin sod, the thing is small and light enough that often I just hand-hold it, because once it's broken up, re-tilling (tilling without rope involves holding the machine back with hands) is fast enough so fatigue isn't a problem, and it hardly bounces unless I'm breaking the hard, glacial deposits of Dryden, with a few 4-5 lb rocks, and ripping grass roots. The benefit of the stoniness, besides that I've now got weights for the bottom of our cat fence, is that there are plenty of minerals in the soil...all it needs is something like the amendments I've added. They increased the earthworm pop. in the plot, which is the best thing for a garden. When the harvest is done, I'll till in more and be ready for a quick till and start in the spring.

I've had gas tillers, but I like this better...plug in and go...no messing with the machine.

Or, maybe the next tenant will use the tilled garden...who knows about the future? At least I'll have made a tiny bit of this earth more productive. My 1st garden in about 30 yrs, and I'm loving watching things grow.

I bought a 36" landscape rake (Kobalt, lifetime guarantee) and used the mix to level the lawn, and planted clover, then rolled it...smooooth and green, and fixing its own nitrogen by the day!

LOL, I'm not really up on the % anymore, since the state put its jackboot on my neck and forced me to relinquish my natural right to farm it...their motto should be "We'll destroy your life, using dollars we've stolen from you, even though you have harmed no one. Because that's what we do.".

You can see why the issue is no longer merely academic to me; an experience like that concentrates one's attention...forces one to consider how things really work. I think they meant to create an obedient little soldier of the state...a better-indoctrinated slave, but it eventually helped, in large part, to cause the opposite effect. That event kicked the 1st log out of the jam. They showed me what the real enemy of humanity is, and how it operates.

Seeing millions and millions of innocent people being muirdered by them, or their proxies and pawns, over my years, all over the world, hasn't made me respect them at all, either. At all.

It's the same government that claims legitimacy and virtue that is doing these things, and it's mostly the same people, changing but slowly, simply due to age, so often, more than a sudden distaste for the wielding of the whip, or an onslaught of conscience and Christian behavior.
Wounded Knee and Sand Creek, Ruby Ridge and Waco, Falullah and Mai Lai, or my front porch...it's the same criminal gang. The only reason they didn't kill me is because I didn't resist, although I had a natural right to. That's the only reason, and the only real difference, except in numbers of people affected.

Sometimes a green costume, sometimes a blue costume, but the attitude never changes...they don't care.

I picked 12 out of the air...I just know whether it's working well, nowadays. And the more I keep up with the back stories of current events, and learn about the real history of this nation, the more I need it to work. To paraphrase the little old lady in the joke, "It's dead bodies all the way down.".
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/26/12 11:11 PM

VM you moved?
Aah! I see some one here pays attention to thier surroundings
"LOL, I'm not really up on the % anymore, since the state put its jackboot on my neck and forced me to relinquish my natural right to farm it...their motto should be "We'll destroy your life, using dollars we've stolen from you, even though you have harmed no one. Because that's what we do.".
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/26/12 11:24 PM

Yeah...4/1/12. if you're ever passing through, drop in for coffee. Bring meds. JK...bring yourself. Well...if you insisted, I wouldn't fight it; one should always do what the guest wants to do. Do you think watching your movie for a while would be too scary for me? Maybe I'm not rated for much of all that is what I'm thinking. Okay...yeah...I'll just start with 10...it's my lucky number.

We could pop over to the range in Freeville, and you could demonstrate your famous shooting skill...I hear you are remarkable.

Saaay...those aren't the shooting-at-nothing-on-the-front lawn-while-naked-and-giggling-shrilly meds, are they? The green ones? Maybe I should safely dispose of them for you...
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/12 05:44 AM

Smitty over the winter I will save up and look into that tiller..... I am going to mulch my leaves with the mower and make sure my planned garden area has a good layer for the winter. Then early next spring there is a spot near my wife's aunts house that give away manure, that I will mix in. I just pray to God my back is better.... I am sooooo sick of this \:\(
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/12 12:52 PM

your PMs need dumping

Got directions?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/12 07:03 PM

Good move...compost is the best stuff, along with worms it will attract, which aerate and drain the soil, and the castings of which are really the best, readiest to use manure; it doesn't burn anything.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/12 07:11 PM

Are you sure? I just received one an hour ago, on a short thread, started today. But I'll dump a few.


67 E. Main, N side of street, adjacent to and east of the Town salt barn, which is in the village. The cattle auction is adjacent on the west side of it...maybe 350 yds from me. Saay...you're a good shot...do you like prime rib?

Seriously, we've got an empty field which extends about 3/4 mi to the back of us...we see chucks, foxes, turkey, rabbits and deer there...throughout the village, really. We hear coyotes on many nights.

You can Google Map it, or you can recognize our place by the crack-baited bear traps that Newsman 38 has caused me to put in the yard. And the gasoline moat...hat tip to Mr. Leininger, as well as Mr 38.
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/12 07:31 PM

Saay...you're a"GREAT,Awesome shot...do you like prime rib?

Prime Ribs,who doesn't. Hope they are white/light in color
as the impact shows up better. Exit wounds there's very little doubt about it. Some animals do jump and turn just before they fall. Need chain saw to pre butcher it so we can drag them out.

No problem with range if you'd spot for me?
50 cal 1/2 mile, they'll never know where it came from!

How many would you like so I can gather up the correct rounds I need. Would you like whole beef or tenderized beef.

Oh hell I'll bring one extra round just in case one moves.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/12 08:33 PM

Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/28/12 07:33 AM

Not to get off topic.....but did someone say Prime Rib???? MMMMMMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 08/28/12 11:14 PM

Come on over...take some of the evidence beef home with you. Got a truck? That's the trouble with these big game hunting expeditions...sometimes it's hard to hide the evidence. Anyway, we'll have an extra bushel of greenies and 3 boxes of 7.62 for you. In case there are any calves around. The rule is to shoot, even if they appear to be paisley or argyle patterned calves...the blighters are clever at disguise. Sometimes it helps to close one eye and examine them closely, but no matter; there's plenty of ammo. I was kidding about being naked, though. We're now thinking pink speedos might be high fashion in Dryden.

Topic? What is the topic? I can't even remember yesterday anymore. Anyway...hunting tasty cows...gardening...stealing apples from the local orchard...candy from the neighbor's kids...it's all about good eating!
MOoo! Bang! MOxx...!
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/12 03:33 AM

I'm not a hunter.... so you KILL it....I'll GRILL it!

BTW I have a few extra pair of pink speedos if SkySoldier and I did it want to join in
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 08/29/12 10:52 AM

OK,fair warning, pink speedos get lots of snickers from medical staff in the ER. So be careful not to get hurt.

Years ago a heavy man came into ER wearing bright "Hot Pink" speedos. The worst part was his large "beer belly" hanging over the speedos. The nurses could barely keep straight faces and maintain professionalism around him. Back at the nurses station was a whole different thing. Snickers and quietly giggling by all.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/11/12 05:52 PM

the rain seemed to help the flowers
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/15/12 06:57 AM

the weather person predicts another mild winter
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 09/16/12 05:59 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
the weather person predicts another mild winter


You won't hear me complain! \:\) But then again how often are the weather people correct \:\/

Just like last Saturday....for DAYS they were predicting "The Storm of the CENTURY" with 80mph winds, large hail, and flooding downpours.... We ended up having 10 minutes of a moderate rain and a light breeze \:\/ Because of that forecast the "bounce house" company cancelled the giant slide and bounce house rental for Adelynn's 4th Birthday Party ...when in actuality we could of had it!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/16/12 03:49 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
with 80mph winds,

the "bounce house" company


if the 80 mph winds did show up it would have made that bounce house interesting for kids
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/27/12 07:26 AM

weather person predicts 75 degrees next week

;\)
Posted by: big sissy

Re: Gardening forum - 09/27/12 07:47 AM

We had huge hail and very strong winds for that storm, lots of limbs down too.
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 09/28/12 06:26 AM

getting close to picking time in Lodi isn't?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/14/12 02:25 PM

temps went down below 30 degrees the other night
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 10/14/12 04:09 PM

[quote=bluezone]weather person predicts 75 degrees next week

Great news getting ready to plant my Garlic & harvset some more of my Sun Flower seeds. Up to the 18th generation of seed.
My goal for this year is grow a record breaking Sun Flower.
25' tallest on record. 32" pettle to pettle, and a whopping 837 buds to one plant. I'm trying to break the biggest flower.
Until I leran the proper way to measure the flower I might of made it. I use to measure only the SEED Pod - the pettles
Four years ago I had a head that measure 22"x17' tall about 50 flowers on it. I never give up,I'll get it this year.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 10/14/12 10:02 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
temps went down below 30 degrees the other night


Yeah, it was a hard frost in Dryden. I lost the last few peppers I'd left on the plants. But, I had a great year; best garden I've had. We're at 1100 ft. Figure 3 degree drop per 1000'.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/15/12 08:25 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
But, I had a great year; best garden I've had.


plenty of sun this summer
one just needed to water the plants as the rain was limited
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 10/15/12 04:24 PM

I did water, and the sawdust/manure mix I tilled into the garden really helped with fertilization, aeration, and drainage.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/16/12 09:00 AM

correct
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 10/22/12 03:22 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
But, I had a great year; best garden I've had.


plenty of sun this summer
one just needed to water the plants as the rain was limited



To help with the cost of water this year and besides the chemicals that's used to make our drinking water safe,yea safe .I got 5 55gal plastic barrels to catch the rain water and use it on the garden things looked a lot better and healthier plants. Small amount of lumber for the cradles and faucest installed we saved money had plenty of water and a better crop.
Anyone interested in these Blue or White drums feel free to contact me and I can set you up "FREE" for them. This year I'm connecting another barrel to the ones that I already have.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 11/12/12 08:51 PM

weather was nice this past weekend
near 70 degrees
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 11/12/12 09:22 PM

My ideal would be to have it like this all winter. 60 to 70 degrees and no snow.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 11/13/12 02:56 AM

I would LOVE a winter like that too!! I harvested my herbs and strung them up to dry this weekend. Chives, Rosemary, Dill, and *Winter* Thyme. My basil plant that was so strong and healthy and grew to over 3.5ft. was wiped out by the first hard frost. \:\( Let the dog out before bed it was healthy and beautiful....let the dog out the next morning and the entire plant was BLACK! \:\( \:\( \:\( I could shoot myself for not bringing it in that night \:\(

Now that 90% of the leaves have fallen on the trees that surround me, I mowed the lawn for the final time this weekend. My mower has a mulching blade that works awesome on the leaves...NO raking involved and it leaves a gentle layer of mulched leave dust to protect the lawn through winter
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 11/14/12 12:00 AM

Planting some more Garlic in morning.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 11/14/12 03:14 AM

I might have to look into growing some garlic. My m-i-l last weekend at the local church bazaar bought me a ceramic dome used for roasting garlic. Place garlic in dome, drizzle with olive oil, place in 350 degree oven and 20 minutes later viola Roasted Garlic MMMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmm Works great to add fresh garlic to mashed potatoes or to the butter for my homemade garlic knots MMMMmmmm
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 11/29/12 09:32 PM

warming near 60 degrees in the next few days
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 11/30/12 05:24 AM

I don't know what forecast you saw.... It is currently 29 and snowing here with a high of 34 today, 43 degrees tomorrow, and high of 53 on sunday with rain and a "real feel" of 46
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 11/30/12 10:59 AM

Here is beautiful Seneca County about a mile east of the tip of Seneca Lake, No Snow. So far this year all I have seen is a few flurries in the air nothing has stuck. Hope it continues this way all winter.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 11/30/12 02:07 PM

I'd be happy to send you pictures of the 6 inches we got on November 8th in the tri-state area@! Sheesh.....Hurricane then major snow. It hasn't been our year! \:\/
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 11/30/12 05:57 PM

As long as it is not in my driveway, I'm good.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 11/30/12 08:33 PM

It was in the driveway, too...and on the cars and weighing down already weakened trees...It's been quite a fall!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/03/12 10:45 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I don't know what forecast you saw.... It is currently 29 and snowing here with a high of 34 today, 43 degrees tomorrow, and high of 53 on sunday with rain and a "real feel" of 46


did it warm up today?

north carolina should be warm....
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 12/03/12 10:52 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I don't know what forecast you saw.... It is currently 29 and snowing here with a high of 34 today, 43 degrees tomorrow, and high of 53 on sunday with rain and a "real feel" of 46


did it warm up today? They didn't let you out today cuz the meds weren't working, huh? ?

north carolina should be warm....
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/03/12 11:03 PM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
Here is beautiful Seneca County about a mile east of the tip of Seneca Lake, No Snow.


may cool down for a few days but the weather person says it may warm up again
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 12/04/12 05:02 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I don't know what forecast you saw.... It is currently 29 and snowing here with a high of 34 today, 43 degrees tomorrow, and high of 53 on sunday with rain and a "real feel" of 46


did it warm up today?

north carolina should be warm....


Gonna be 70 today and tomorrow with overnight lows in the 50's in Carolina Beach where our friends live.

Trust me.... I cannot get down South fast enough! But we want "all our ducks in a row" before we do anything because the move will be PERMANENT! In a mere 9 days our daughter will be done with her first semester at college. It was a rough start adjusting being away from home, but she is finally getting the hang of it and settling in nicely. She is also an *RHA* (resident hall assistant) and pretty much set to be an RA her sophmore year and have a private room and living wage(no roommate drama) that in itself will be more settling for us to leave her in Buffalo if we move. Holly is also caretaker for her 86 year old grandmother (87 this month) and Gram REFUSES to move (she was born and lived her entire life in Delphi Falls and she wants to Die in Delphi Falls)...Not to mention she is still active cooking for the church's parish house, the quilting club, and bible study group and we don't want to take that away from her, and not to mention all her friends still alive and here. So we also have to wait for that to play out. We also have to sell the house and find jobs. Unlike you we can't just transfer welfare payments and hook up the 1986 Ford to the trailer and leave \:\/
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/08/12 07:58 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
She is also an *RHA* (resident hall assistant) and pretty much set to be an RA her sophmore year and have a private room and living wage(no roommate drama) that in itself will be more settling for us to leave her in Buffalo if we move.


good to hear she is making out better
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 12/08/12 08:19 AM

Thank you. We are TOO! It was hard to see her struggle so far from home and the nightly distressed calls were heart wrenching. Now that she has TV(won a 19" Flat Panel at a RHA meeting) and a new roommate that is the same major as her and the same interests it it much more relaxing for all of us. She was determined to stick it out because she LOVES all her classes and LOVES all her Professor's.... Not to mention having A's & B's in every class. We are so proud of her!

If it all works out next September she will be an RA with a FREE private room, paycheck for being an RA, and be "the long arm of the law" LOL
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/14/12 07:50 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
We are so proud of her!


as you should be
she showed promise in high school
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 12/19/12 10:01 AM

snow may be coming for next week
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/14/13 07:44 PM

below zero temps may be coming next week per the weather person
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/22/13 07:25 PM

mother nature is making up for the warm winter last year

hope people keep their pets inside
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/26/13 10:59 AM

for those with a forced air furnace may be wise to check/change the filter

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/29/13 09:21 AM

weather person says the temps may be around 60 degrees tomorrow

;\)
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/06/13 03:59 PM

may get to 50 degrees this weekend
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/08/13 11:38 AM

Can we let our pets out, then?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/13 09:09 AM

have you been keeping them in all winter without a 'potty' time?

let them out...

Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/13 03:44 PM

You had said that you hoped we would keep our pets inside during the cold weather, so I was just checking to see what your advice would be for warmer weather. After all, without your previous advice, my pets would have perished.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/13/13 08:37 AM



only during the coldest of days
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/20/13 09:56 AM

brrrrrr

is it spring yet?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/20/13 11:55 AM

As of 0702 3/20/13, it is.
Posted by: Sallie

Re: Gardening forum - 03/20/13 05:54 PM

I just took out the trash, recycles, returnable bottles and got the mail, walked the dog. It is brisk out there!
Wanted
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/20/13 06:38 PM

HA!
From Buffalo:
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/21/13 07:25 PM

Originally Posted By: Sallie
I just took out the trash, recycles, returnable bottles and got the mail, walked the dog. It is brisk out there!


the weather person is saying that it may not warm up until april

it was near 80 degrees last year at this time
Posted by: Sallie

Re: Gardening forum - 03/22/13 09:42 AM

HAH!
Posted by: I did it!

Re: Gardening forum - 03/23/13 08:40 PM

Is it time for me to start my seeds?
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/13 09:03 PM

Funny!

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/733745_387941727980090_1074454000_n.jpg
Posted by: Teonan

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/13 09:52 PM


Ta!

Spring needs to BRING IT!
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/27/13 10:00 AM

you got a happy dance for us?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/30/13 06:03 AM

Quote:
it was near 80 degrees last year at this time


Yeah. I hadn't worn long johns for several decades...since I was a skier. This week, after poring over Amazon reviews to figure out what's best now (one of Amazon's most useful features, IMO), I bought some, in several materials.

Normally, they'd be in a drawer about now, but I'm field-testing and enjoying them as I stand here.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/13 05:02 PM

My purple and yellow crocuses are in full bloom and my hyacinths are filling out.
Daffodils are about 6 inches high, and it's past time to plant my sugar snaps. Come on Spring!
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 03/31/13 09:57 PM

Three fat Robins has a meeting in my driveway this afternoon.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/10/13 08:21 PM

they would have gotten a substantial bath today with all the rain
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/11/13 10:42 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Yeah. I hadn't worn long johns for several decades...since I was a skier.


downhill or cross country skiing?
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/11/13 12:17 PM

I want to try this.

Got Pallets? Hate weeding? Dont feel like turning up a bunch of grass? Use a pallet as a garden bed - staple garden cloth on the backside of the pallet fill with dirt and start growing!

Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 02:06 AM

SilverFox, that is VERY cool. I may try that at the community gardens near me when I move. What a GREAT idea! Do you know the location of the story that goes with the picture? I'd love to read it.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 02:53 AM

Never mind SilverFox, I just did a google search and found more than I ever would have thought possible about pallet gardening. Interestingly, at least to me, is how many of the sites are using the same pictures and information. I love the verticle positioning of the gardens as well as those lying on the ground. I'm obsessed!
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 08:34 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Yeah. I hadn't worn long johns for several decades...since I was a skier.


downhill or cross country skiing?


You have no idea how tough things were when I was a kid.There was no such thing as downhill skiing...it was uphill both ways.
Posted by: SilverFox

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 01:18 PM

Originally Posted By: HeavenlyPlaces
SilverFox, that is VERY cool. I may try that at the community gardens near me when I move. What a GREAT idea! Do you know the location of the story that goes with the picture? I'd love to read it.


Sorry, this is all I know. It showed up on my Facebook. I think maybe it was originally put on FB by Reilley. Maybe if you message her she could tell more about it. I'm not much of a gardener but I thought this looked easier to manage for just a few veggies or strawberries for myself.

Now I will have to check further. Thanks for the google tip.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 03:44 PM

I love the vertical ones too! They look so cool. I just wonder how they keep the dirt in when vertical. I guess I could google it...
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 04:16 PM

Ahem, yes, I guess you could! The instructions pretty much tell you how the dirt stays in but, in a nut shell....

You back one face of the pallet and the four sides with landscape fabric. I think one side can be left open if you're placing it in a vertical position. The other recommendation is that you leave the planted garden down for a few weeks to allow the plants to take hold of the dirt.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 05:42 PM

\:\)

Thank you. I'm thinking of doing a variety of lettuce, or is it lettuces? I guess I could google that too, but...eh.... \:\)
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/12/13 06:20 PM

LOL...Lettuces!


(I'm so sorry that I know trivial things like that...I don't even know WHY I know it...sigh)


There are lots of great varieties of lettuce and my own inclination is to open all the various packs of single type seeds that I love and mix them together in a sugar shaker with wide holes and the sow the little lovelies that way. But I do like how the pallets look with alternating rows of different colors and types of tender leaves.

I'm becoming involved with a comunity garden near where I've just purchased a fabulous (or will be when I finish with it!) new little co-op (well new to me...it was built in 1916 or so and just amazing brick and charm oozing out of the mortar!) Anyway, I'm plotting (pardon the intended pun, I just can't help myself) a way to incorporate the concept, perhaps using the verticals up against the chain link fencing to surround the garden and provide privacy and beauty all at the same time. Might keep some of the street noise from penetrating, too.
Posted by: *Sparkey*

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 05:08 AM

We want to plant some plants/bushes around our pool,any suggestions Please and Thank-you!!..I do not know one bush from the next either..no green thumb here!!
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 05:22 AM

I'd probably plant a combo of differemt hostas and perhaps some astilbes on the more shaded sides of the pool and some brightly colored annuals like nastertiums and/or petunias, etc., in either a wild mass of different colors or in a coordinated theme. I'd avoid roses as I dont' think they'd do well with the chlorinated water from the pool splashing about. But some hardier bushes like the various butterfly bushes would be both pretty and hardy....and if all else fails just take a walk through a garden center and see what "speaks" to you!
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 01:04 PM

I had my cat euthanized 4/12. 20 yrs, 5 months...pancreatic cancer. A long, happy, healthy life, with a short decline, for a wonderful cat.

Increasing abdominal fluid, and increasing weakness, but no great pain, as far as we could see, and the Vet didn't think he was in pain, either. Ambulatory until the end. We took the Vet's advice: "When he stops eating...that's it.". I couldn't see running the string out for a few more hours, or few more days...it wouldn't have been fair to him.

Why is this in "gardening"? Well...gardening is all about the cycle of life.

I carefully planted him 6" to the side of my tomato plot, and 1' below max cultivator depth.

He is returned to the earth, the bugs and microbes will recycle and distribute him, the plants will take up nutrients from that earth, I will eat from the plants, and "Fourteen" will be incorporated in me, and thus stay with me, on the cellular level. What constituted him will partly constitute me.

A scientific romantic doesn't mess around; he recycles his pets, and becomes one with them. And, an optimist figures that he'll at least live until the tomatoes are ripe. We never can be certain, but it never hurts to bet that way, and I do feel pretty healthy. \:\)

Posted by: Della

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 03:34 PM

Sorry for your loss \:\(
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 04:19 PM

So sorry. My baby is 17 this Spring, and I try to appreciate every moment.

\:\(
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 04:20 PM

I love Rose of Sharon, especially the blue/purple variety. They are simple bush plants that can be pruned to just about any shape. They also multiply easily so are very affordable.
Posted by: *Sparkey*

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 06:30 PM

Awww.VM..sorry for your loss..but you gave me an idea...I still have my dog Brutes ashes in the garage..since 1982 I have been carrying this box around...someone tried to buy it from my garage sale 2 years ago..now he will be near the pool..as we also had one as kids!!!
Posted by: *Sparkey*

Re: Gardening forum - 04/16/13 06:32 PM

Thank you HP I was hoping you would chime in..LOL..
Also thank you twocats for your choice!!
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/17/13 02:53 AM

Thanks, everybody. He was a good cat. And I do plan to reincorporate some of his molecules, after all. \:\)

I just ordered 4 African Violets from the Violet House, which overlooks Canandaigua Lake, and which is online. I haven't grown any since I was about 13. Anybody into AV?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/19/13 09:11 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
I had my cat euthanized 4/12. 20 yrs, 5 months


our sympathy
many memories to hold onto
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/20/13 05:36 PM

Thanks. I was thinking of starting the cultivating today, but we had a snow flurry 2 hrs ago; I'm not in that much of a hurry. \:\)
Posted by: Ghosts

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/13 07:01 AM

Such a long life to create so many great memories. I am so sorry for your loss.
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 04/21/13 12:28 PM


Just a friendly heads-up regarding the use of pallets in vegetable gardens. Until only a few years ago, pallets (almost without exception), contained huge amounts of arsenic.

While no longer, used in the US, many tainted pallets are still in circulation. It's my understanding that arsenic-free pallets are required ti have a mark or brand indicating that they are arsenic-free, although I don't know what the mark looks like.

Arsenic builds up in the body, and is an especially nasty thing to get poisoned from.

Safe and Happy Gardening.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/22/13 11:46 PM

I just ordered 20 tomato plants, of 5 varieties, all heirloom, and all indeterminate (1st time for me), except for one Siberian, which I picked because of the 48 day maturity.

I'm going to go primitive, and let them sprawl.

Siberian, Black Krim, Caspian Pink, Cherokee purple, Brandywine Black.

Av. last frost here is 5/14, and it usually comes 10-20,so they'll ship week of 5/13.

I got the first-pass cultivating done today. Now I'll spread some cow manure/sawdust mix, till it in, and...

I'm ready!
Posted by: secure white guy

Re: Gardening forum - 04/23/13 06:32 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
I just ordered 20 tomato plants, of 5 varieties, all heirloom, and all indeterminate (1st time for me), except for one Siberian, which I picked because of the 48 day maturity.

I'm going to go primitive, and let them sprawl.

Siberian, Black Krim, Caspian Pink, Cherokee purple, Brandywine Black.

Av. last frost here is 5/14, and it usually comes 10-20,so they'll ship week of 5/13.

I got the first-pass cultivating done today. Now I'll spread some cow manure/sawdust mix, till it in, and...

I'm ready!


Fantastic choices. Brandywines seem impervious to any threat thrown at them. Have you tried the Russian heirloom Black from Tula? Outstanding. Unless you're confident in your soil, and assuming you'll avoid using chemical applications, it might be wise going 50/50 with the sprawl. Having a garden full of mature ground clingers suddenly ravaged by critters is an ugly experience.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/23/13 11:31 AM

It probably would be wise, but, even though most of the advice I've read advises agianst sprawling, some do like it. I'm mentally prepared to possibly lose half to bugs/rot, depending on conditions, but I'm tired of cages (storing, etc.)

I sprawled my determinates last year, and they did well. Indies will take a lot more room, but I have it. I'll go with a 4x4' or 4x5' seperation, staggered.

I'm still considering, though. I may prune them to 2 or 3 leaders (cut the suckers, which I've never done), and sprawl, or cut them back to one leader and train them onto a vertical string, hung from a horizontal string...seems to be the easiest support method I've seen.

B from T looked good, but there are so many varieties to choose from that it's tough to decide.

I looked at about 6 places. I went with:

https://www.gardenharvestsupply.com/ProductCart/pc/Potted-Heirloom-Tomato-Plants-for-Sale-c150.htm

They charge $4/plant, where most charge $6/plant, but they don't have B from T.

Do you know if sprawling acts to shade the ground, maybe requiring less watering?

Since indies, unlike determinates, ripen sequentially, until frost, rather than in 1 or 2 flushes, I wonder how much trouble it would be to just look for the ones that are starting to ripen, and are presumably then more attractive to bugs, and prop them up, off the ground, on small, inverted containers, or maybe cheap, short sticks or tubes, rubber-banded or taped into bipods or tripods?

They had a tomato soil test kit for $3, so, for the 1st time, I won't be guessing and hoping that the ph is correct.


Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/23/13 08:23 PM

I've never used cages. I've always used stakes, from bamboo to aluminum. I just tie the plants loosely once every 2 weeks or so, and I've never had a problem. The stakes are easier to store than cages.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/24/13 02:11 AM

I've been thinking about stakes...thanks for the input.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/24/13 01:23 PM

Okay...I'm going to use this beautifly simple combo idea. Pics will enlarge:

http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/2013/01/1...e-stake-a-cage/

One pic shows La Roma, which is a shorter, determinate variety, and when the author mentions a 4' stake, I assume he is including the buried part of the stake's length, since he didn't say height. With taller indies, I'll need a longer stake (is 6' long enough, anyone?), but a 2x2" (the stakes look that size to me) should still be plenty big.

Years ago I tried a silicone-based deck preservative, which appealed to me because it had no arsenic, which was commonly being used to kill the microbes that feed on wet wood. IOW, it worked by attempting to keep the wood dry, to begin with.

I quickly found that it was too slippery, on a deck, particularly when wet.

But I'm going to search the current thinking on the toxicity of silicon, which always used to be considered inert, and possibly may still be, even after the lengthy flap over breast implants. Many think that was merely an intensive support program for lawyers.

I'm thinking that something like that deck preservative might get many more years of use from the stakes. 100% silicon multi-purpose spray might be a little more expensive, but you'd really only have to do the buried part, and the exposed end grain on top.

Or, I might go full redneck, and just cap the top with nicely colored duct tape...tan or white, say...I could permanent marker the variety on it. I'm thinking maybe no nails or big staples...just twine or plastic lock-tie the mesh to the stakes, and cut it off for more compact storage.

Or, just hang the mesh on short, heavy permanent nails or screws, to support the weight, and tie or tape the mesh to the stake with something light, to keep it on the nails.

I like the flatness of the configuration; with south-facing orientation, I can prune to grow multiple stems (limiting to 2, 3, or 4, I'm thinking), without having some shade others from the southerly sun, as can happen with cages.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 04/24/13 05:51 PM

4 feet is plenty long enough. I would skip the mesh completely, and just tie up the heaviest branches.

As far as preservative, I've never used any and my first set of stakes lasted over a dozen years.

The aluminum ones were a gift from someone who had some leftover piping of some sort and are the easiest the pound in.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/24/13 08:22 PM

I'd put almost a foot in the ground. Some of the plants might be 7'. 3' height seems short to me.

I think just the stake would work fine for 1-stem plants, but with multiple stems, I think that tying them close together at the stake would cause some leaves to shade others, just like with cages.

With the mesh, I could prune to 2, 3, or 4 stems, and they might be spread out enough to all get good light.

If a leaf isn't lit so that it's able to produce more sugar than it consumes, that leaf can be a drag on the rest of the plant, even if that leaf looks okay. If a leaf gets too little light to be able to produce enough sugar for its own needs, it yellows and withers.

The choice with pruning is:

More stems, more and smaller fruit.
Fewer stems, fewer but larger fruit.

But, each additional growing stem tip requires energy that the plant can't use to produce fruit, so you might get slightly fewer lbs of fruit/plant, if you have too many stems, is the idea. I'm thinking maybe 2-3 stems, on 16-24" width. I have to look at material stiffness before deciding how wide, and how many ties or fasteners to the stake.

One reason, perhaps the only reason, that cages are 3D is that they have to be, to stand up; A stake/mesh hybrid seems to me to be a practical idea. I like the ease of just weaving the plant, instead of tying, the wind stability of the stake, and I like arranging the plant "flat" in the sun, with probably fewer leaves shaded by others.

It does the same things as a "fence weave" system, but I'll be able to walk all the way around a plant.

Yeah...gotta look at materials. Rolled materials, whether it's concrete reinforcing mesh, or heavy fence mesh, come off a roll with a curve "set" into them, which remains, and which adds bending (flopping over, here) stiffness; I may be able to continue the mesh up over the top of the stake somewhat, and any plant will be just fine until it's a foot or more high, so I could maybe use a 3' stake height, after all, and more than one roll width might work, with any given stake height, depending.

LOL...ask me next year, and I'll know more. Meanwhile...it's hard to screw up tomatoes to the point of total crop failure...they're so rewarding.

And since these are supposed to be tasty, prolific, and reliable varieties, I'm looking forward to my 1st indeterminates.

Many prefer the taste of indies. Apparently, determinates were 1st bred so that they'd have a plant that ripens all at once, for machine picking. Not an issue, in a home garden. In fact, unless you can or freeze, you might want the harvest spread out, for eating as they ripen. The more things that a breeder has to select for, other than taste, in breeding, the less a breeder can concentrate on taste.

Heirlooms are non-hybrids, and are often defined as those developed before about 1950, when hybrids became more popular.

Hybrids were often developed to have thicker skins, for commercial shipping, with the nearly all-important, from our POV, taste, sometimes necessarily taking a seat nearer the rear.

I'm excited.

Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/13 05:21 AM

I'd definitely go with at least 6' lengths for your indeterminates. I used to run a long length of 2 x 4 mesh (I was growing as many as 70 tomato plants at the time) supported with 6' metal stakes and the plants still grew up over the mesh. It's a great way to grow tomatoes because of the "weaving" and easy suckering. For a smaller garden, I like the method you've shared with us and have placed the website you mentioned in my favorites for further study.

I'm excited, too, as I'll be able to start a garden of my own this year. Maybe too late for tomatoes but we'll see. There's just nothing like getting your hands dirty with good rich soil!
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/13 12:43 PM

Thanks; I will take your advice on stake length.

Last frost here is May 10-20; average is the 14th, so it's not too late for plants. I went with plants, instead of seeds, because, with 11 cats, I didn't have any warm, safe place to start seeds. I think cats must never sleep; they spend their nights plotting ways to foil our plans.
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/13 08:08 PM

I probably won't get into my new place until about July 1st. I will probably plant lettuces in the late summer...Mid to late August for a fall harvest. Oh, and herbs I've already started in pots and they'll move with me. I could do a few tomato plants in pots but I've never had much luck with them and I end up with the most expensive 2 tomatoes in town!
Posted by: Dr117

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/13 10:44 PM

Planted my corn,green beans,broccoli,sweet peppers yesterday.
Waiting on the tomato plants tomorrow.
I installed 6ea 55 gal rain water collecting barrels for the garden this year to help save on water bills and have better water than what comes from our faucets out of the towns water supply.
We don’t even drink that water, we use 5 gals bottle water that’s delivered monthly supplied with it’s own hot/cold water supply
Posted by: Lamees

Re: Gardening forum - 09/18/13 12:12 PM

Good topic. I love gardening, I locate a Greenhouse outside my home. It looks pretty and shade the home effectively.
Posted by: Lamees

Re: Gardening forum *DELETED* - 09/21/13 12:20 AM

Post deleted by FL1 Mod 2
Posted by: HeavenlyPlaces

Re: Gardening forum - 09/21/13 06:37 AM

Ahhh, as I suspected...SPAM
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/05/14 08:17 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I wish I had more friggin' day lilies grin


groundhog thinks there are 6 more weeks of winter

blush
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/17/14 08:29 AM

Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I wish I had more friggin' day lilies grin


weather person is saying it may go up to 50 degrees this week
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 02/18/14 06:15 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: SilverFox
I wish I had more friggin' day lilies grin


weather person is saying it may go up to 50 degrees this week


I've got my Stellas D'Oros in pots in a south window, where they bloom in winter.
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 02/18/14 09:05 AM


Ordering non-GMO seeds from Baker Creek Heirloom this week.

Planting them next week.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 02/18/14 01:13 PM

At a glance, that looks good, so I bookmarked, ty.

I plan to order my tomato plants from here, as I did last year:

https://www.gardenharvestsupply.com/productcart/pc/buy-vegetable-plants-online-c44.htm

With 10 cats, it's tough for me to find places to start seeds indoors.

My favs from last year were Black Krim and Cherokee Purple. Both had excellent yield and flavor. All 5 varieties arrived in perfect shape, though, and they're $1-2 cheaper than other online places.

I did sprawl...no problem except slugs, which went away after I used slug bait, sprinkled on the ground. I used no other pesticides. It's a mineral/bacterial, not a standard chemical, type killer. Got it at Agway.

I'll use non-GM, heirloom seeds for other stuff, such as greens, from one place or the other, this year, started in the ground.

Having my canned tomatoes with Lundberg Brown California Basmati rice and chicken gizzards, onions, and a home-grown jalapeno tonight. Pressure cooker,15 min. I soak/ferment/rinse/drain twice, rice for 24 hrs, which reduces cooking time and removes even more arsenic. It's non-GM, and Cali rice is much lower in arsenic than Gulf coast rice, anyway. Mike adams has tested Lundberg, and heavy metals content is far lower than other brands. Brown Basmati has the lowest glycemic index, and the best flavor and aroma, of all rices. All that is important, and I ate 60 lbs of rice last year. Amazon has Lundberg in 25, 30 or 40 lb bags...forget which (I re-containered), and I tried 2 other brands and sizes, from Paki and India, before settling on Lundberg.

Another good way to remove arsenic is to cook the oriental way, with 6:1 water, and strain the excess water off after cooking.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/14 08:54 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo

Ordering non-GMO seeds from Baker Creek Heirloom this week.

Planting them next week.


inside but not outside
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 03/03/14 03:42 PM


<sigh>
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/14 07:48 AM

weather person is saying it may warm to 40 degrees by friday
Posted by: young guns

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/14 03:28 PM

This Friday the 7th? Now that is great news if I may say so.
Posted by: MissingArty

Re: Gardening forum - 03/05/14 11:34 PM

On February 7, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered yet another pesticide known to be toxic to honeybees—over the objections of citizens and environmentalists, and despite research suggesting it was a bad idea Will it take an Act of Congress to protect the pollinators that are critical to our food supply? Fortunately, the Saving America’s Pollinators Act (H.R. 2692) has been introduced. Unfortunately, it’s still languishing in committee, where it was sent in August 2013. Tell Your Representative: Please Support the Saving America’s Pollinators Act (H.R. 2692) - See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/di...h.amUjopqu.dpuf
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/20/14 10:04 AM

one weather prediction is that april and may will be cold also
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 03/23/14 10:28 AM

If the bees go, they're taking us with them. My garden is a haven for honeybees.
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 03/24/14 11:49 PM

So's my lawn, since I sowed Dutch White clover. There are some hives in the farmer's field out back, too...maybe .25 mile distant, and in the village. Now, if he can just keep his bull from returning to my yard, I'll be happy. A bull and cows, turkey, deer, and coyotes...it's an interesting village.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/25/14 09:21 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith
Now, if he can just keep his bull from returning to my yard, I'll be happy. A bull and cows, turkey, deer, and coyotes...it's an interesting village.


dinner...
whistle
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/23/14 09:20 PM

Originally Posted By: Timbo

Ordering non-GMO seeds from Baker Creek Heirloom this week.

Planting them next week.


so how are they doing?
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 06/24/14 10:08 AM


Amazingly well, thanks.

Planted:
* Several types of Tomatoes.
* Several types of Peppers.
* Eggplant.
* White Onions.
* Summer Squash, Zucchini, Buttercup and Acorn Squashes.
* Green Pole and Yellow Bush Beans.
* Snap Peas.
* Cukes.
* Broccoli.
* Butter-Crunch Lettuce and Spinach.
* Assorted Herbs.

Will be planting winter crops later on.

Only lost one pepper seedling, so far. Everything else is doing great.



Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/24/14 08:00 PM

seems to be growing well

the grass along some of the borders are getting a little 'too friendly' with the perimeter garden plants wink
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 06/24/14 11:03 PM


My trusty Weed Wacker takes care of that in seconds. Between that and non-treated timbers, my "square-foot garden" weeding time, has been reduced dramatically.
Posted by: misscooleyes

Re: Gardening forum - 07/01/14 11:04 AM

When is the right time to prune a lilac tree?
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/01/14 04:56 PM


Lilacs bloom on "old wood", so, if you live in NY State, it's critical to prune them in the spring, right after they're done blooming. If you prune later than that, they won't bloom the following year (you'll have removed the new buds that are set by late springtime).

If you haven't done it yet, leave them alone until just after they bloom, next year.
Posted by: misscooleyes

Re: Gardening forum - 07/01/14 07:25 PM

OK Thanks so much.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 07/07/14 10:22 PM

What a beautiful garden! smile
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/09/14 01:27 PM


Thanks!

After another two weeks and a good rain ...




Posted by: Teonan

Re: Gardening forum - 07/10/14 03:45 PM


N-i-c-e! cool
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/10/14 04:41 PM


Grillin' Veggies all summer. Stop by.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/22/14 06:38 AM

Looks great Timbo! Me and the whole trailer park will stop by Sunday afternoon for some grilled veggies grin

Anyone know how to maintain Blackberry bushes. After 5 years of living here I had blackberry bushes appear out of nowhere last summer on the side of my deck and I left them be. This summer they returned and bore fruit. It is my understanding they will not bare fruit in the same spot of the plant next year. I have searched forums but alot info is very vague and no pictures and I don't want to trim or cut the wrong parts.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am also considering transplanting them to my fence row so they can grow along the fence. I just need to know the best way of doing it and the best time to do it.
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/22/14 11:11 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Looks great Timbo! Me and the whole trailer park will stop by Sunday afternoon for some grilled veggies grin

Bring "good" beer and you can even let the Libertarians tag along. grin

Unfortunately, I'm no help with blueberries.
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/23/14 04:43 AM

When you say "good" beer..... That means Pabst Blue Ribbon right??? grin
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/23/14 04:22 PM


Uhhh... which trailer park did you say ? ? ? eek
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/24/14 05:53 AM

PBR is *top shelf* to me...... I buy it when I get paid and feel *rich* other than that it's Milwaukee's Best Ice LOL wink grin
Posted by: young guns

Re: Gardening forum - 07/26/14 02:03 PM

Originally Posted By: Timbo

Thanks!

After another two weeks and a good rain ...






Great looking.
I lost all my Garlic to weeds.To many things going this year.
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/26/14 03:10 PM


Yeah, I'm bummed I keep forgetting to plant garlic cloves in the fall. This year for SURE.

As for weeds... mad
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/28/14 01:43 PM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Anyone know how to maintain Blackberry bushes. After 5 years of living here I had blackberry bushes appear out of nowhere last summer on the side of my deck and I left them be. This summer they returned and bore fruit. It is my understanding they will not bare fruit in the same spot of the plant next year. I have searched forums but alot info is very vague and no pictures and I don't want to trim or cut the wrong parts.


do you pick the fruit for use?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/28/14 01:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: teedoff27
blackberry


Unfortunately, I'm no help with blueberries.


he asked about blackberries
wink

Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 07/28/14 04:23 PM


Same with them.
Posted by: young guns

Re: Gardening forum - 07/28/14 04:56 PM

Garlic yes I love it. I plant or try to at the first full moon in October an it's ready for harvest in July
Posted by: young guns

Re: Gardening forum - 07/28/14 04:58 PM

My red raspberry's have gone crazy again this year. Grand kids love picking them the only problem they never fill their bowls but instead eat till full or all are picked.LOL
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/29/14 04:25 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Anyone know how to maintain Blackberry bushes. After 5 years of living here I had blackberry bushes appear out of nowhere last summer on the side of my deck and I left them be. This summer they returned and bore fruit. It is my understanding they will not bare fruit in the same spot of the plant next year. I have searched forums but alot info is very vague and no pictures and I don't want to trim or cut the wrong parts.


do you pick the fruit for use?



Yes I eat them! MMMMmmmm I want to trim/prune it in hopes of yielding more next year so I can make at least one pie with them. I also think they will thrive along my fence, especially if I weave them through the links so they can grow and expand and not take over my lawn like they are starting too next to my deck.

I just can't find definitive info and pictures of WHAT to cut and WHEN to cut and or transplant.

I'm excited about getting the last round of raspberries that grow wild along the property of the gun club tonight at Trap. smile I get cut up doing it (not good for someone on 8.5mg of Coumadin/day) but the pain/blood is so worth it MMMMMmmmmmm.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/30/14 11:13 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Anyone know how to maintain Blackberry bushes. After 5 years of living here I had blackberry bushes appear out of nowhere last summer on the side of my deck and I left them be. This summer they returned and bore fruit. It is my understanding they will not bare fruit in the same spot of the plant next year. I have searched forums but alot info is very vague and no pictures and I don't want to trim or cut the wrong parts.


do you pick the fruit for use?



Yes I eat them! MMMMmmmm I want to trim/prune it in hopes of yielding more next year so I can make at least one pie with them. I also think they will thrive along my fence, especially if I weave them through the links so they can grow and expand and not take over my lawn like they are starting too next to my deck.


do you have one blackberry bush or more than one?
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 07/30/14 03:40 PM

Numerous.... They keep multiplying. They are VERY healthy and don't want to kill or ruin them by pruning or transplanting them wrong.
Posted by: twocats

Re: Gardening forum - 08/21/14 07:54 AM

Originally Posted By: young guns
Garlic yes I love it. I plant or try to at the first full moon in October an it's ready for harvest in July


I've heard to plant it during the World Series and harvest during the All-Star break. smile
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/22/14 10:55 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
Numerous.... They keep multiplying. They are VERY healthy and don't want to kill or ruin them by pruning or transplanting them wrong.


transplant one and once it gets established do another one
you must water the transplant every day for about a month until it gets established
Posted by: teedoff27

Re: Gardening forum - 08/25/14 05:45 AM

I just wish I could find a video that shows step by step how to properly prune. All the articles I have seen, has written instructions that are confusing to a novice like me.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/25/14 09:09 PM

post the instructions
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 09/30/14 02:04 PM


Anyone doing any canning this year?
Posted by: simongrow250

Re: Gardening forum - 10/07/14 12:00 AM

Is the blackberry, the plants are you referring for?
Posted by: VM Smith

Re: Gardening forum - 10/07/14 01:49 PM

Originally Posted By: simongrow250
Is the blackberry, the plants are you referring for?


Should he use one of the greenhouses you show on your homepage?
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 10/07/14 02:34 PM


Pot, meet kettle.
Posted by: MissingArty

Re: Gardening forum - 11/05/14 06:11 AM

On The Trail To Preserve Appalachia's Bounty Of Heirloom Crops

Veteto is part of a growing number of seed savers who are helping revive heritage fruits and vegetables that are on the brink of extinction. And he says that most of the dedicated seed savers in Appalachia are aging, so there isn't much time left to help farmers keep cultivating these valuable antique seeds.

http://news.mpbn.net/post/trail-preserve-appalachias-bounty-heirloom-crops
Posted by: MissingArty

Re: Gardening forum - 02/08/15 08:47 PM

GMO Free USA

Time to plan your spring garden. How do we know if the seeds we buy for our garden are GMO free and have a low risk of cross contamination? We check the Council for Responsible Genetics listing to make sure the seed company has taken the GMO free "Safe Seed Pledge". HOWEVER - you should know that Seeds of Change is owned by Mars (GMO M&Ms, etc.) and Mars is on the wrong side of the fight for transparency and truth in GMO labeling. We do not suggest buying from Seeds of Change for this reason. (Thank you to Ralph Gallella for bringing this to our attention!)

You should know that seeds that are at the highest risk for GM contamination are corn, summer squash/yellow crookneck and zucchini... as well as alfalfa & papaya should anyone be in a climate where they can plant and grow papaya.

Now is the time to order your seed catalogs to choose what to grow in your spring garden. With more and more people taking back control of their food and growing some of heir own food, there is a chance the seeds you want may sell out if you don't order early. Happy GMO free seed shopping!

What's your favorite seed company?

Check the safe seed list here: http://www.councilforresponsiblegenetics.org/ViewPage.aspx?pageId=261
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/21/15 10:06 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
I just wish I could find a video that shows step by step how to properly prune.


with all the snow this winter there may be a delay in the growing season

the ground will be saturated with the water from the snow melt
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/01/15 02:08 PM

Originally Posted By: simongrow250
Is the


temperature may rise to 40 degrees in your area next week

look for the flowers to start blooming

grin
Posted by: MissingArty

Re: Gardening forum - 03/01/15 04:06 PM

Retired USDA microbiologist. Every farmer and gardener should listen to this.

Our Guest - Robert Kremer, Ph.D. is a Professor of Soil Microbiology at the University of Missouri and recently retired after a 32-year career as a research microbiologist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service.

http://www.naturalhealth365.com/talkhourshow.html#sthash.oHonShyV.dpuf
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/11/15 09:33 AM

Originally Posted By: teedoff27
They keep multiplying.


wait until all the snow melts
plenty of moisture in the ground to flourish
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/14/15 09:03 AM

Originally Posted By: VM Smith

Should he


reached nearly 80 degrees in some parts of the finger lakes area

flowers must love that warmth
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 04/14/15 09:52 AM


The Beans, Swiss Chard and Broccoli in my garden certainly do.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/28/15 10:45 PM

Quote:
Secret Lawn Tonic Recipe From Golf Course Groundskeeper - Updated
by Paul Michael on 23

This recipe came from Tim Heffron, a former groundskeeper at a golf course. All you need are five common household ingredients and a 10-gallon hose-end sprayer. This recipe can be modified slightly for other less dry climates, but for areas like Colorado it works wonders. And it's a heck of a lot cheaper and more effective than the store-bought mixes.
You will need:
One full can of regular pop (any kind-no diet soda)
• One full can of beer (no light beer) 12oz
• 1/2 Cup of Liquid dishwashing soap (do NOT use anti-bacterial dishwashing liquid)
• 1/2 Cup of household ammonia
• 1/2 Cup of mouthwash (any brand)
Directions:
• Pour into 10-gallon hose-end sprayer (other sizes will work too)
• In high heat, apply every three weeks

The liquid soap is a wetting agent, helping the formula penetrate the roots.
The ammonia promotes growth and turns your lawn green.
The mouthwash does something you would never suspect mouthwash would do. It kills the bugs and grubs.
NOTE: Do NOT use anti-bacterial dishwashing liquid in the mixture as it will kill off important microbes in the lawn and soil that help "digest" thatch.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/09/15 08:54 PM

with all the rain you all been getting in your area you should have some plants blooming by now
Posted by: MissingArty

Re: Gardening forum - 06/10/15 05:18 PM

***Breaking News: USDA approves genetically engineered insects for field trials in New York State***

Just when you think organic farming is all about beautiful photos of cute animals and growing plants, you get hit with this – the USDA has approved the field release of Oxitec’s genetically modified diamondback moths at Cornell University.

We need transparency, oversight, and safety for our farmers' livelihoods! Click here for details and watch for more updates as this unfolds.

June 10th, 2015

Groups Urge New York State Government, Cornell University to Notify Public About Genetically Engineered Diamondback Moth Field Trial

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/pressre...th-field-trial/
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/22/15 08:37 PM

Originally Posted By: simongrow250
the plants are


the roses should be opening with all the rain recently
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/27/15 11:08 PM

weather person believes that the winter will be warmer and less snow compared to last year for the northeast

el nino
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/15/16 08:43 AM

plants that are newer and do not have deeper roots should be watered during this dry period

if not all plants
Posted by: Teonan

Re: Gardening forum - 07/15/16 10:06 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
plants that are newer and do not have deeper roots should be watered during this dry period

if not all plants


Indeedaroo. Ty!

Hot tips from Doc and Katy.

Watering: Hot Weather Tips to Save Your Plants
http://www.lifeinthefingerlakes.com/watering-hot-weather-tips-save-plants/

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/16/16 10:42 PM

local news had reports of some larger trees falling over due to the dry conditions

may need to water the larger trees also

their leaves may give you some indication
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 08/18/16 12:01 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
local news had reports of some larger trees falling over due to the dry conditions

may need to water the larger trees also

their leaves may give you some indication

10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient. crazy
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/19/16 07:25 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.


crazy

and how many inches of rainfall would there need to be to supply 10,000 gallons of water to the base of a tree?

1/4 inch?
1/2 inch?
1 inch?
1.5 inches?
2 inches?
50 inches?

...
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 08/20/16 12:16 PM


It all depends on the surface area, capillary action, saturation, runoff, as well as absorption and percolation rates, doesn't it ? ? ? whistle

Next silly question...
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/23/16 07:08 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.


is that per day, per week, per month or per year?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/28/16 06:31 PM

a 20' round swimming pool contains 10,000 gallons at a level of 48"

must be you get 48" of rain fall monthly whistle

next silly reponse...
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 08/28/16 07:53 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
a 20' round swimming pool contains 10,000 gallons at a level of 48"

must be you get 48" of rain fall monthly whistle

next silly reponse...

False, analogy.

Depending on lack of ground moisture (This area was undergoing a severe drought), 10,000 gallons of water would be so rapidly sucked into the surrounding dry earth, as to provide virtually NO benefit to "large" trees. Especially, with large trees that have mostly surface roots (as most of our region's trees do).

Go easy, now... you're abusing your typical alottment of harebrained comments.
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 08/30/16 01:33 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.


Originally Posted By: Timbo

Depending on lack of ground moisture (This area was undergoing a severe drought), 10,000 gallons of water would be so rapidly sucked into the surrounding dry earth, as to provide virtually NO benefit to "large" trees.


more contradictions from Timbo...
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/09/16 07:22 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.


have you received 10,000 gallons of rainfall over the past few weeks?

48 inches...
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 09/09/16 06:48 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Depending on lack of ground moisture (This area was undergoing a severe drought), 10,000 gallons of water would be so rapidly sucked into the surrounding dry earth, as to provide virtually NO benefit to "large" trees.

more contradictions from Timbo...

Zoom! Right over your head! grin
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/16/16 06:26 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.


a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 09/19/16 03:26 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?

Cylindrical or Rectilinear, Ovular or Oblique? Please specify Temperature as well as Barometric Pressure (provide all variances and rates of change). cool
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 09/20/16 06:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?

Cylindrical


cylindrical
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/01/16 04:10 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?

Cylindrical


cylindrical


not able to come up with an answer?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/05/16 08:40 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?

Cylindrical


cylindrical



would it be 10 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, 40 feet... tall?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 10/28/16 11:03 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?

Cylindrical


cylindrical



would it be 10 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, 40 feet... tall?



must be you figured out that for 10,000 gallons of water a tree would need to be a few HUNDRED feet tall to contain that amount of water grin
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/12/17 05:13 PM

possible 8"-12" of snow coming
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/07/17 09:05 AM

move the plants outside soon
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 04/07/17 11:21 AM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.
a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?
would it be 10 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, 40 feet... tall?
must be you figured out that for 10,000 gallons of water a tree would need to be a few HUNDRED feet tall to contain that amount of water

Stupefying. Your train of logic is still stuck at the station.

Much to the benefit of humanity, it's a good thing that you don't work in any field of science.
crazy crazy crazy
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/08/17 09:06 AM

are you not able to 'quote' a prior post or did you alter it to fit your needs?

the correct one is below

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?

Cylindrical


cylindrical



would it be 10 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, 40 feet... tall?



must be you figured out that for 10,000 gallons of water a tree would need to be a few HUNDRED feet tall to contain that amount of water grin
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/08/17 09:09 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
[quote=bluezone]10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.
a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?
would it be 10 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, 40 feet... tall?
must be you figured out that for 10,000 gallons of water a tree would need to be a few HUNDRED feet tall to contain that amount of water
/quote]
Stupefying.


....stupefying....on your part that you are not able to do a simple 'quote' of a prior post whistle
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/08/17 09:13 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

Cylindrical



here is your formula

Formula:
3.1417 x R² x D
= Cubic Feet
****
Cubic ft x 7.47
= Gallons


now tell us how tall the tree would be...

Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 04/08/17 05:43 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
....stupefying....on your part that you are not able to do a simple 'quote' of a prior post whistle

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.
a column holding 10,000 gallons of water with a diameter of 4 feet would be how many feet tall?
would it be 10 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, 40 feet... tall?
must be you figured out that for 10,000 gallons of water a tree would need to be a few HUNDRED feet tall to contain that amount of water

Stupefying. Your train of logic is still stuck at the station.

Much to the benefit of humanity, it's a good thing that you don't work in any field of science.
crazy crazy crazy


BETTER? cool
Posted by: Timbo

Re: Gardening forum - 04/08/17 06:00 PM

Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

Cylindrical
here is your formula

Formula:
3.1417 x R² x D
= Cubic Feet
****
Cubic ft x 7.47
= Gallons

now tell us how tall the tree would be...

No, that's YOUR formula and it's meaningless tripe. Your failure to consider variables ignores entirely, critical considerations such as percolation rate, soil constituents, density and compactness, absorption, runoff, mean table level, temperature, evaporation, membranous interference, capillary forces and at least a dozen other contributing factors.

Of course, I already explained all this to you. But like every fact you ever come across, you either prefer to ignore them or simply can't understand them. The results are the same, either way.

Not to mention that the the original issue is one of how much water one would need to properly water a Maple Tree thats' roots (of a given diameter) are partially shielded from water uptake due to sidewalk located a given distance from the trunk. You failed then as well to understand the basic geometry and hydrodynamics required to accurately aid in determining THAT equation. It was NOT about how tall a tree needs to be to... oh, never mind. What's the point, Schultzie?

You, of all people should recognize the dangers of pulling the scabs off of your deep, unhealed forum battle wounds. Hell, you're absolutely covered in 'em.

Enjoy your crow.
Posted by: Teonan

Re: Gardening forum - 04/09/17 06:59 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

Cylindrical
here is your formula

Formula:
3.1417 x R² x D
= Cubic Feet
****
Cubic ft x 7.47
= Gallons

now tell us how tall the tree would be...

No, that's YOUR formula and it's meaningless tripe. Your failure to consider variables ignores entirely, critical considerations such as percolation rate, soil constituents, density and compactness, absorption, runoff, mean table level, temperature, evaporation, membranous interference, capillary forces and at least a dozen other contributing factors.

Of course, I already explained all this to you. But like every fact you ever come across, you either prefer to ignore them or simply can't understand them. The results are the same, either way.

Not to mention that the the original issue is one of how much water one would need to properly water a Maple Tree thats' roots (of a given diameter) are partially shielded from water uptake due to sidewalk located a given distance from the trunk. You failed then as well to understand the basic geometry and hydrodynamics required to accurately aid in determining THAT equation. It was NOT about how tall a tree needs to be to... oh, never mind. What's the point, Schultzie?

You, of all people should recognize the dangers of pulling the scabs off of your deep, unhealed forum battle wounds. Hell, you're absolutely covered in 'em.

Enjoy your crow.


Now, that's what's known as having one's onions handed to em' and getting schooled in a single move.

Deftly done. Class dismissed.
cool
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/17/17 08:23 AM

Originally Posted By: Timbo
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: bluezone
Originally Posted By: Timbo
10,000 gallons or so, should be sufficient.

Cylindrical
here is your formula

Formula:
3.1417 x R² x D
= Cubic Feet
****
Cubic ft x 7.47
= Gallons

now tell us how tall the tree would be...


No, that's YOUR formula and it's meaningless tripe.


and how tall would that tree be then?

YAWN...
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 05/17/17 08:29 AM

Quote:
Secret Lawn Tonic Recipe From Golf Course Groundskeeper - Updated
by Paul Michael on 23

This recipe came from Tim Heffron, a former groundskeeper at a golf course. All you need are five common household ingredients and a 10-gallon hose-end sprayer. This recipe can be modified slightly for other less dry climates, but for areas like Colorado it works wonders. And it's a heck of a lot cheaper and more effective than the store-bought mixes.
You will need:
One full can of regular pop (any kind-no diet soda)
• One full can of beer (no light beer) 12oz
• 1/2 Cup of Liquid dishwashing soap (do NOT use anti-bacterial dishwashing liquid)
• 1/2 Cup of household ammonia
• 1/2 Cup of mouthwash (any brand)
Directions:
• Pour into 10-gallon hose-end sprayer (other sizes will work too)
• In high heat, apply every three weeks

The liquid soap is a wetting agent, helping the formula penetrate the roots.
The ammonia promotes growth and turns your lawn green.
The mouthwash does something you would never suspect mouthwash would do. It kills the bugs and grubs.
NOTE: Do NOT use anti-bacterial dishwashing liquid in the mixture as it will kill off important microbes in the lawn and soil that help "digest" thatch.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/07/18 11:25 AM

going from 2 degree weather to nearly 50 degrees in a few days
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/20/18 05:45 AM

warmer temps over the next few days

may even rain
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 01/30/18 10:09 AM

will the groundhog see its shade?
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 02/02/18 07:43 AM

six more weeks of winter sayz the groundhog
sick
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 03/22/18 11:05 AM

may warm up by next week... wink
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/14/18 06:21 AM

may warm up by next week... wink
Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 04/25/18 07:36 AM

Quote:
Secret Lawn Tonic Recipe From Golf Course Groundskeeper - Updated
by Paul Michael on 23

This recipe came from Tim Heffron, a former groundskeeper at a golf course. All you need are five common household ingredients and a 10-gallon hose-end sprayer. This recipe can be modified slightly for other less dry climates, but for areas like Colorado it works wonders. And it's a heck of a lot cheaper and more effective than the store-bought mixes.
You will need:
One full can of regular pop (any kind-no diet soda)
• One full can of beer (no light beer) 12oz
• 1/2 Cup of Liquid dishwashing soap (do NOT use anti-bacterial dishwashing liquid)
• 1/2 Cup of household ammonia
• 1/2 Cup of mouthwash (any brand)
Directions:
• Pour into 10-gallon hose-end sprayer (other sizes will work too)
• In high heat, apply every three weeks

The liquid soap is a wetting agent, helping the formula penetrate the roots.
The ammonia promotes growth and turns your lawn green.
The mouthwash does something you would never suspect mouthwash would do. It kills the bugs and grubs.
NOTE: Do NOT use anti-bacterial dishwashing liquid in the mixture as it will kill off important microbes in the lawn and soil that help "digest" thatch.

Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 06/10/18 08:20 PM

Roses are in full bloom

curious to see what other methods people use to keep the roses lasting longer after it is cut and placed in a vase to enjoy indoors

use a certain container?
add anything to the water?
keep them near a window or more in a shady area?

or any other suggestions to keep the cut roses to last longer in the vase would be appreciated







Posted by: bluezone

Re: Gardening forum - 07/25/18 03:09 PM

recent dry spell did not thelp the flowering plants